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Migration: Ungrateful Europeans Who Adopted The Edomite spirit now Prefer Ishmael & Esau to Isaac & Jacob

Posted by addisethiopia on October 24, 2017

Biblical Prophecy Unsealed Before Our Very Eyes

 

[Genesis 27:39-40]

Then Isaac his father answered and said to him:

Behold, your dwelling shall be of the fatness/ (rich places) of the earth,
By your sword/ (your gun) you shall live,
And you shall serve/ (be subject to) your brother;

And it shall come to pass, when you become restless,
that you shall break his, (Jacob’s), yoke (of civility)
(those “onerous chains of bondage” to Jacob’s “straight” life), from (off) your neck.”

Over One in Five German Residents Come from a Foreign Background

A newly released report has shown the true extent of the impact of mass migration on Germany as 18.6 million residents, over one-in-five of the total population, now come from foreign backgrounds.

The statistics come from the German Federal Statistical Office’s new yearbook for 2017 which finally shows the extent of demographic change that many Germans have assumed for years. The figures also show a huge divergence between the west of the country and the east with some areas in the west having up to 30 per cent foreign background residents, Die Welt reports.

The region with the most foreign background residents is Bremen with 30.5 per cent of the population coming from a non-German background. The regions in the east are diametrically different, averaging only 6.4 per cent with Thuringia the lowest at just six per cent.

An estimated 4.3 million non-German residents come from European Union countries and live and work under the open borders Schengen agreement. Poles are the largest single EU citizen group with a total of 783,000 Polish citizens living in the country.

The single largest nationality among the 18.6 million foreign residents are those of a Turkish background at 15 per cent of the total.

Turks in Germany have made their presence known in large numbers over the past year with tens of thousands demonstrating to support Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan following the failed coup last year and the presidential referendum earlier this year.

In 2015, the migrant crisis led to an explosion of population growth for Germany as the statistics show that Syrians became the largest group of migrants at 326,379 followed by Romanians at 212,182.

The change has also been much tougher on the German economy as statistics show that most EU citizens move to the country for work while the unemployment rate for asylum seekers and other migrants who came during the migrant crisis has been gigantic.

The issue has led some economists to warn that over the long term, mass migration will be harmful to the growth of the German economy.

Source

My Note: Europe is transforming before our very eyes. Whatever it once was, it is rapidly changing. Children of Esau are united with children of Ishmael.

Pay attention to the current statistics and those from the last couple of years, as they clearly show that Italians, Bulgarians, Polish, Romanians (Edomites / Esau) plus Turks, Syrians, Albanians and Afghans (Ishmaelites) are a grand majority of the “foreign background”, yet, the European authorities and their media continue fearmongering the relatively non-existent African refugees.

When the wicked Eurocrats, local politicians and anti-Africa eugenicist media repeatedly warn their populace with the primitive “Africans are coming” message, they indirectly attempt to persuade them into accepting the light-skinned children of Esau and Ishmael.

First, it was 1 million, then 20 million, and then 100 million. Woow!

Amazing, Biblical Prophecy unsealed before our very eyes!

Are A Million African Migrants Really On Their Way To Europe?


Already, I’m informed by very well informed guys and girls who are working on the area, and in the area at the moment, that there’s potentially up to a million migrants already, if not more in the pipeline coming up from Central Africa and the Horn of Africa.”

Joseph Walker-Cousins, senior fellow at the Institute for Statecraft and former head of the British Embassy Office in Benghazi, speaking to the House of Lords EU External Affairs Sub-Committee on March 30, 2017.

Hard evidence on irregular migration in North Africa is a much sought after commodity; unfortunately, it is also highly unreliable. In its December 2016 assessment of the situation in Libya, the International Organisation for Migration estimated (IOM) that 425,000 internally displaced persons were resident in Libya and that “hundreds of thousands” were displaced into neighbouring countries.Experienced researchers tend to be sceptical of official statistics on migrants for good reasons. North Africa is both a destination and a transit region for sub-Saharan migrants. It is also extremely difficult to count migrants because migration tends to be clandestine, with people moving through politically unstable regions.

Further problems with official reports and comments such as those by Joseph Walker-Cousins are that they tend to focus on Libya (and fail to look at the wider regional picture). Findings are based on indirect evidence – information from informants, detentions, returns, and arrivals in Europe – not primary research that employs sound methodologies, as fieldwork in Libya is not possible.

Unfortunately, the most likely and most effective barrier to migration – barring an effective policy response from other countries in the region – is death and detention. Thousands of migrants have died transiting the Sahara and tens of thousands are “detained” in North Africa.

While the IOM has been able to access some of the detention facilities in Libya, it has not reported on the number of people detained nor their legal status. While European development agencies are beginning to engage with trans-Saharan migration, very little hard data has emerged from their efforts other than an acknowledgement that conflict and drought in northern Nigeria, Mali, Sudan and the Horn of Africa is pushing people northwards across the Sahara.

Verdict: Are there really a million migrants ready to come?

We simply do not know how many migrants are “in the pipeline”. Nor have regional governments or the European Union agreed a viable strategy for dealing with the underlying processes driving this movement, as opposed to stopping migrants from reaching Europe. We do know two important facts. First, and as noted in the 2016 IOM study, not all sub-Saharan migrants intend to come to Europe. Second, without an accurate assessment of the situation and serious policy dialogue with transit countries, no resolution to this issue is possible.

Review, by Nando Sigona, deputy director of the Institute for Research into Superdiversity, University of Birmingham

I agree with the verdict. The story that a million African migrants are ready or in “the pipeline” to reach Europe from Libya is nothing new and Joseph Walker-Cousins’s claim has previously been aired by other variously informed people. It resurfaces periodically in the media (2015, 2016, 2017), but repetition is no proof of validity; rather it is an example of how charts and figures play a significant role in how we understand and debate the so-called refugee crisis.

On the one hand, it encapsulates the power of numbers in firing up public and political debate and sustaining the “crisis mood” that pervades policy responses to boat migration. On the other, it shows the lack of scientific rigour and yet resilience that often characterizes the numbers of the “crisis” that circulate so widely in the global media and among policy makers – impermeable to attempts being made to show how baseless they are.

Source

Refugees: The African Numbers That Put Europe To Shame; It Needs To Think Again


THE current refugee crisis was one of the top items at the UN’s General Assembly this week; on Tuesday, 19 countries announced they are donating $1.8 billion to the top UN aid organizations to help alleviate the suffering of refugees.

The commitment came after UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told world leaders at the opening of the General Assembly debate that UN humanitarian agencies were “broke.”

In an interview that aired Friday on Good Morning America, Queen Rania of Jordan said that her country needs “assistance from the international community. Jordan is a small country that’s quite resource poor, so it’s really been a major issue for us.”

Jordan has been hit particularly hard by the civil war in Syria, watching a flood of 600,000 refugees come into the country from Syria during the most recent wave of the crisis. Jordan itself has a population of just 6.4 million, so that accounts to nearly 10% of its population.

It’s proportionally even higher for Lebanon, with 1.1 million refugees, 25% of its population of 4.4 million. But wealthier Europe has been sharply divided as to how to deal with the refugee influx – even though it has the resources to support many more migrants than it currently does.

The Panic

There are two big debates in Europe at the moment; one questioning which migrants are refugees (because not all are) and how many of these refugees should be allowed to stay, and in which country.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) cites that 350,000 migrants were recorded at EU borders between January and August 2015. In the whole of 2014 this number was 280,000.

Breaking this down indicates that in 2014 the average monthly influx of migrants was roughly 23,000 per month, while this year this average increased to about 44,000 – almost double that of last year’s.

The Facts

The European panic, however, needs to be calmed. Looking at the data just from a group of African countries with most refugees on record, one would appreciate just how much the European scare is exaggerated.

The six top refugee destinations in Africa—Ethiopia (659,524), Kenya (551,352), Chad (452,897), Uganda (385,513), Cameroon (264,126) and South Sudan (248,152—hold together 2,561,564 refugees of foreign origin, who are supported in camps around the countries.

Source

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