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Posts Tagged ‘Washington DC’

How The Tigray Crisis is Affecting Families in The U.S.

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on August 28, 2021

💭 Ethiopia Conflict Leaves Diaspora in US Fearing for Families

As chaos envelops Kabul after Afghanistan’s government collapsed and the Taliban seized control, horrific stories and heartbreaking images also pour out of Ethiopia. Some in the U.S. with a connection to the African country are feeling a call to action.

In Washington, D.C., home to the largest concentration of Ethiopians in the U.S. and the largest Ethiopian population outside Africa, there’s an intense debate over the war and who’s at fault.

“Tigray is part of Ethiopia. Tigrayans are Ethiopians until they decide otherwise. So any war, any suffering in Ethiopia, should be a pain to everybody,” Assefa Fisseha, a man who fled the country 20 years to begin a new life in America, told ABC News.

In Fisseha’s homeland, within the northern region of Tigray, millions are caught in the middle of civil war between Tigrayan defense forces and the Ethiopian government.

Each side has been accused of atrocities throughout the conflict, with systemic rape and starvation used as weapons of war, according to the United Nations, senior U.S. officials and monitoring groups like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. Roads, bridges, hospitals and farms have been destroyed, exacerbating the humanitarian catastrophe, according to aid groups.

But information can be hard to come by. Internet outages by the Ethiopian government have disconnected families inside and outside the country for days, weeks or even months at a time, according to Internet monitor NetBlocks.

With over 110 million people, Ethiopia is the second-most populous country in Africa. The conflict has left thousands dead and displaced roughly two million people in Tigray, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

“On the ground, what I’m really seeing is just hungry people there, people are extremely paranoid and protective,” Leoh Hailu-Ghermy, who made a two-day trek to the region to deliver supplies and aid to refugees, told ABC News.

Hailu-Ghermy is one of the voices in the movement to end the war many activists call a modern-day genocide.

Earlier this month, more apparent victims of the atrocities in the brutal, 10-monthlong civil war washed up on a riverbank in neighboring Sudan. Fifty bodies were believed to be Tigrayans from a nearby village, according to The Associated Press.

There have been reports of massacres, ethnic cleansing and widespread sexual assault by Ethiopian government troops, according to Amnesty International.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken has said the U.S. has seen “acts of ethnic cleansing,” but stopped short of calling the atrocities genocide — a specific legal term in international law. The Ethiopian government has fiercely denied such accusations.

“It’s really heartbreaking to see that people’s livelihoods can be stripped away from them in such an unfair way and that the world wouldn’t care because of the geography of that place or because of the race of those people,” Hailu-Ghermy said.

Just last week, the Biden administration called out the Ethiopian government for obstructing humanitarian aid, including convoys, saying aid workers will run out of food this week.

In May, President Joe Biden issued a lengthy statement, calling for a ceasefire, negotiations to halt the conflict and an end to human rights abuses, including the widespread sexual violence.

The Biden administration also tapped a special envoy for the region to push for a diplomatic solution — and fired a warning shot at the Ethiopian government, a critical U.S. partner, by imposing limited sanctions.

MORE: US restricting visas, aid over conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region

In May, the State Department said it imposed visa bans on officials from Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea — whose military crossed the border to fight Tigrayan forces. Because visas are confidential by law, it did not say who was impacted but the U.S. Treasury slapped financial sanctions on Monday on General Filipos Woldeyohannes, the chief of staff of the Eritrean Defense Forces, accusing his forces of massacres, looting, rape, torture and extrajudicial killings of civilians.

Hailu-Ghermy and other advocates say they are looking for more action.

Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed was once seen as a popular reformer when he came into power in 2018, even winning the Nobel Peace Prize for ending a decades-long war with neighboring Eritrea. His election unseated the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, or TPLF, which dominated Ethiopia politics prior to his administration, and tensions between his federal government and their regional leaders exploded into conflict last November.

“Now that the conflict has been ongoing for several months, it produces its own logic. And so every atrocity, every retaliation begets another retaliation and unfortunately, another atrocity,” Aly Verjee, a senior adviser to the Africa program at the U.S. Institute of Peace, told ABC News.

Tigrayans celebrated when Abiy declared a ceasefire in June, but now their forces are on the offensive and Abiy responded with a call for all capable citizens to take up arms and join the fight to show patriotism.

“Ethiopians at home and abroad, your motherland calls upon you. History has shown that there is no force that can stand in our way when we say no more,” he said in a statement.

Analysts fear the conflict will spiral further out of control, putting hundreds of thousands on the brink of famine and potentially spilling over borders to Ethiopia’s neighbors.

“Let’s not forget that the reason the majority of Ethiopian Americans are in the United States is because, at one time or another, there was conflict in Ethiopia. Let’s not see another generation of Ethiopians feel that they have to leave the country because of conflict,” Verjee said.

Courtesy: abc NEWS

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Posted in Ethiopia, Life, News/ዜና, War & Crisis | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

New Video Shows Erdogan Watching His Armed Thugs Beat Protesters, Journalists in Washington DC

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on May 19, 2017

Erdoğan’s security detail were allegedly involved in the fights. The police did their best to stop the skirmish.

The video shows Turkish President Erdogan watching as his armed thugs beat protesters and journalists in Washington DC.

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Posted in Conspiracies, Infos, Photos & Videos | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SHOKING VIDEO: Turkey Erdogan’s Bodyguards Brutally Attack Armenian Christian Protesters in Washington DC

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on May 17, 2017

Let the world see and learn how savage and barbaric the Turks are. If they do this, as guests, in a free country, imagine how they treat Christians and Kurds in their savage country.

A demonstration outside the Turkish Embassy in northwest Washington led to nine people being injured, and two arrested. UNBELIEVABLE!

This is MINGBOGGLING, INSANE! Turkish Bodyguards with guns attacking people in Washington DC! Just SHOKING! And the police is watching how they beat unarmed people. OUTRAGEOUS!

The Antichrist beast believes the world belongs to it. The inbreed Turks are attacking Armenians and Kurds, kicking and hitting women and innocent protesters – as if they are still in Turkey. Only cowards attack older men and women, only cowards attack in a number 50 vs 10.

COWARD Turks

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Posted in Infos, Photos & Videos | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

American Christians Wear Orange in Solidarity With Those Persecuted For Faith

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 16, 2015

07coptsB1424815091Obama, Obama, did you see? Christian blood in the sea

Hanna Asaad, front, is among of group of Egyptian Coptic Christians marching toward the White House on Tuesday in remembrance of 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians recently beheaded in Libya by Islamic State.  

A group of Egyptian Coptic Christians, including Amer Sabet, holding a cross, march from the White House toward the U.S. Capitol in remembrance of 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians recently beheaded in Libya by Islamic State.

Hanna Asaad, a network engineer in Fairfax, Va., grew up in the village of Aloor in southern Egypt. He was able to immigrate to the United States several years ago, but his best friend and cousin, Samuel Alham, sought work as a laborer in nearby Libya, like many other Coptic Christians in the impoverished region.

Shortly after Christmas, Alham and 20 of his fellow Coptic laborers were kidnapped by Islamic State militants in Libya. In mid-February, they were marched to a Mediterranean beach in handcuffs and orange prison jumpsuits. Then they were beheaded with knives as a video camera recorded the gruesome scene.

On Tuesday, Asaad, 29, joined 20 protesters who donned orange jumpsuits and stood outside the White House, then knelt with their hands behind their backs. Behind them, other demonstrators held up photographs of the real victims and the blood-red waves where their headless corpses were thrown.

I kept calling my cousin and telling him he had to leave Libya, but there was no safe way out,” Asaad said. “The militants came looking for Christians and then took them away. They murdered my cousin, my nephew and my classmates. Someday soon they will start murdering people in this country.”

About 50 demonstrators, who marched slowly from the White House to Capitol Hill under police escort, demanded that U.S officials take more aggressive action against the Islamic State and other radical Islamist groups, including Boko Haram in Nigeria and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

Hanna Asaad, front, is among of group of Egyptian Coptic Christians marching toward the White House on Tuesday in remembrance of 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians recently beheaded in Libya by Islamic State.  

Obama, Obama, did you see? Christian blood in the sea,”they chanted. 

For Copts in the Washington area and across the United States — mostly a population of educated, professional émigrés — the seaside slaughter was an especially horrific incident in a history of increasing persecution that the Christian minority group has faced in its native Egypt. Recent attacks included the bombing of a church on New Year’s Day, 2011, in the city of Alexandria, which left 21 worshippers dead and 79 injured.

Meanwhile, as militant Islamist ideology spreads, Christian groups are confronting attacks in other parts of the Middle East and South Asia.

Continue reading…

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Posted in Ethiopia, Faith, Infos | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Etete: One of Washington’s 10 Best Restaurants

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 22, 2013

EthioCuisine2Politics and power brokers make for some buzzy gossip – and heady prices – at top restaurants. But thanks to the diversity of people who call the United States capital home, the D.C. dining scene is also a melting pot of eclectic flavours and international cuisines. From high-end to humble, there are some must-taste dishes, tastes and places to try.

ETETE

D.C. is known for authentic offerings of Ethiopian cuisine. You won’t do better than this room in the district’s Little Ethiopia neighbourhood. Get the spicy house specialty, the tikul (marinated spiced ground beef), along with a vegetarian platter full of perfectly seasoned stewed lentils, peas, greens and string beans. Then dig in, mopping up every last bit with the spongy, slightly sour injera bread.

Source

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Posted in Ethiopia, Infos | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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