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Posts Tagged ‘Soccer’

No Sane Christian African Should Support Egypt, Tunisia & Morocco at The World Cup

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 23, 2018

May all these three cruel and rude nations leave Christian Russia soon!

Here is why:

Many Egyptian Christians Feel Left Out of World Cup

Egypt’s first World Cup in 28 years has captivated the soccer-crazy nation, with intense focus on the squad and the broader game.

The Egyptians played the first match of the tournament June 15 and held two-time World Cup winner Uruguay scoreless for 89 minutes, until conceding a late goal and losing 1-0.

Still, the performance – with star striker Mohamed Salah injured on the sidelines – attracted international praise and gripped the millions of people gathering in groups across Egypt to watch their team together.

It was a welcome distraction for Egyptians who are struggling under harsh economic conditions. The 3-1 loss in the next match to host Russia, even with Salah back in the lineup, ended Egypt’s chances of advancing beyond the group stage. Despite the loss, the love and respect enjoyed by the team and the players remained intact.

Yet it wasn’t an entirely unifying experience.

For the country’s Christians, about 10 percent of the population, the composition of the team and the way the squad was perceived highlighted what they believe is a problem with the sport in Egypt.

No Christian has been on the national soccer squad for more than a decade, and just one played for any of the 18 top-flight clubs last season.

Egyptian coaches and officials dismiss any suggestion of discrimination, but Christians disagree. Egypt’s Christian spiritual leader has broken the church’s silence on the issue by publicly complaining about their disproportionate representation in the sport.

Egypt’s all-Muslim World Cup squad is known for being pious. The team even chose make its World Cup base in Muslim Chechnya.

The national squad has been nicknamed the prostrators because the players offer a Muslim prayer when they score. They regularly pray together when in camp and read the opening verse of the Quran before kickoff. Some perform the Muslim ritual wash before games. Generally, they frame competition, wins and defeats in religious terms.

Hassan Shehatah, one of Egypt’s most successful coaches, said nearly a decade ago that, to him, a player’s religious piety was as important as his skills. Hassan led an all-Muslim squad to win three of Egypt’s seven African titles between 2006 and 2010.

When goalkeeper Ahmed Elshenawy was named man of the match against Uruguay, he refused the Budweiser-sponsored award on religious grounds.

The perceived exclusion of Christians from top flight soccer and the national team is at odds with the outreach to the ancient community by Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, Egypt’s general-turned-president who led the military’s 2013 ouster of an Islamist president. El-Sissi has emphatically and repeatedly spoken about inclusion and sectarian harmony. However, his government, critics and some Christians say, has failed to shield the community from the day-to-day discrimination, particularly in rural areas with less state authority and religious tolerance.

Pope Tawadros II, head of the Orthodox Coptic Christians and a close el-Sissi ally, rarely speaks publicly of discrimination, but has recently waded into the issue with uncustomary bluntness. “It’s extraordinary that all of Egypt’s football teams don’t have a single Copt who has good legs and who kicked a ball on the streets when he was little,” he said.

Ahmed Hossam, a retired striker – and a Muslim who played for some of Europe’s biggest clubs – was more blunt.

He claimed in a recent television interview that youth team coaches were driving Christians away.

Regrettably, there’s a lot of people in Egypt who are bigoted over color, religion and ethnicity,” Hossam, better known as Mido, said. “We must confront them and not bury our heads in the sand. Can you believe it that in the history of football in Egypt, only five Christians played at the top level?”

As the only Christian on his soccer youth team, Ramon Zhery says he tried everything he could to blend in with his teammates. At the end, it was not enough. Zhery, now 28, plays for a third division club in southern Egypt. He says discrimination against his faith kept him from rising further.

Speaking to The Associated Press, Zhery recounted how he tried to establish harmony with his teammates and reassure them that, though a Christian, he was just another player like them.

When they huddled before kickoff to recite the Quran’s opening verse – a ritual meant to serve as a plea for divine help – he whispered a Christian prayer to himself. When at camp, he woke up before everyone and went about rousing them to perform the dawn prayers, one of five that Muslims offer daily.

Mohammed Salah is a world star and he prostrates every time he scores and everyone knows he is a Muslim,” said Zhery.

The Christians’ response to their perceived exclusion from domestic soccer has been “church football” – a nationwide league of five-a-side teams that is played mostly on church grounds or rented pitches.

Andrew Raafat, a physical education teacher who tried his luck in club soccer before he settled for a coaching job at a Cairo Church, says some of the better young players he works with want to play at the top level.

I cannot tell them that they will never be selected,” Raafat said. “They get selected sometimes, but they are later let go.”

Selected Comments:

Christians better wake up. The rest of the world is not interested in living in harmony with you or treating you fairly.

Crux: when selection is not based mostly on merit, Egypt is sending a soccer team that is not as good as it coulf be. Prayers aren’t gonna solve their insufficiency. They reap what they sowed…

Well, the Egyptian soccer player PRAYERS must not have been effective…. They still lost miserably. Now we know why – they are not right with god, but seek god’s favor….

Render unto soccer that which is soccers.

Christians in the ME should be given their own country….sort of like Israel.

That was called Lebanon….but Muslims got a foothold….and you know the rest.

Source


DISCRIMINATION AGAINST COPTS IN EGYPTIAN SPORT CLUBS


This report has been sent to the FIFA officials directly, and submitted online via the new FIFA complaint mechanism.

Copts have been struggling with widespread, comprehensive and systematic religious, governmental and societal discrimination, which extends to all aspects of life in Egypt, including sports and soccer. During the past half-century, an infinitely small number of Coptic footballers – no more than 6 – have managed to join top flight soccer clubs. Some of those have spoken out about the rampant religious intolerance and the difficulties they have encountered. For instance, former Coptic footballer Ashraf Youssef told a newspaper that his teammates refused to eat with him simply because he is Christian (1). There are currently 540 players in the top-flight soccer clubs in Egypt, and that number includes only one Coptic footballer. The Egyptian Olympic Mission to Brazil in 2016 was completely devoid of Copts, and the same applies to the Egyptian National Team at the 2018 World Cup in Russia. Not a single Copt can be found in either the main team or the reserve, and it follows that there are no Coptic sports commentators anywhere in official Egyptian media outlets or in private Muslim-owned media.

Coptic Solidarity has filed a formal complaint with FIFA in 2016 to investigate the widespread sports and soccer discrimination against Christians in Egypt. This Complaint prompted many Christians to speak up about the significant religious discrimination in soccer, which amounts to sports racism. A number of moderate brave Muslims have also addressed the same issue.

In Egypt, we have a large number of racists who do not try to hide [their racism],” said renowned international player Ahmed Hossam – known as Mido – in a TV interview. He frankly wondered, “Does it make sense that throughout the entire history of soccer in Egypt, there have only been five Christian footballers at the top level? There are many Christian children who are not allowed to continue to play because of the racist attitude of certain coaches. I have proposed that Christians should make up at least 10% of all junior teams in order to resolve this problem”(2).

In another TV interview, footballer and sports commentator Khalid Al Ghandour mentioned a racist incident against a Coptic person at Minya Sports Club. The caller, Shenouda Wahba, reported that one of his relatives had signed up for soccer tryouts at Minya Sports Club. The club’s technical director rejected him and stipulated that he should convert to Islam in order to be selected. Mr. Al Ghandour concluded by saying, “No one knows more than I do that there are Christian soccer talents treated unfairly in Egypt, it is absurd that there are 18 major soccer teams, and not a single Coptic player in any of them” (3).

Strangely, instead of investigating this racist incident, the Sports Media Committee rebuked Khalid Al Ghandour, claiming that his statements provoke sedition and fanaticism!!!!(4).

An altercation, seen on TV, between Al Ahli club technical director, Mr. Ikrami, and a young Copt named Pierre Zouhair Shafiq, took place when the young Christian man expressed his desire to join Al Ahli. When Ikrami found out that Shafiq and his colleague were Christians, he pointed to the main door of the club and told them to get out (5). Shafiq’s colleague recalled the incident in another TV interview and confirmed that Ikrami threw them out after realizing they were Christians (6).

In an interview with Al Youm Al Sabee newspaper on March 22, 2018, Pope Tawadros II, who usually steers clear of the issue of Coptic rights, said in answer to a question about the lack of Coptic soccer players, “Do not ask Copts about this, rather address the question to clubs and playgrounds, how likely it is that there is not a single Coptic footballer to be found in all Egyptian soccer teams?!!”(7).

At the well-known club Al Ahli, a Christian child named Tony Atef was rejected because he had a cross tattooed on his wrist. The media picked up on the incident, which forced the club to reconsider and accept him to avoid a possible scandal (8).

Dr. Yasser Ayoub, the most renowned sports reporter in Egypt, wrote several articles explicitly stating that there is widespread sports discrimination against Copts. In one of them, he observed, “It is neither logical nor natural that we do not have a single Coptic soccer player in all of the Official Egyptian league teams … One of the real reasons for this situation is the implicit oppression of Copts, which is not acknowledged due to ignorance and intolerance, or out of fear of offending sensibilities and causing tension” (9, 10, 11).

Mr. Ayoub reiterated in another interview, “Anyone who tries to prove that Christians are discriminated against in soccer is considered an agitator who is sowing sedition, so the issue is only raised in secret, while everyone denies it publicly” (12).

Egyptian intellectual Dr. Khalid Montaser put it in a nutshell in an article in Al-Watan Egyptian newspaper, “There is a chronic red line set against admitting Christians to soccer teams in Egypt  … We are a racist state par excellence, and a nation adept at discriminating between its children by means of religion, and this is the reason we did not even have 10 Christian footballers over the past 100 years … If a Christian excels and tries to join a team, the coach may sing his praises, but then turns him down because ‘he is unfortunately a Christian’”(13).

Author Sami al-Behairy told one such story: his Christian friend Maged Nabih Mikhail had passed the tryouts in Al Ahli club, performing well in front of the foreign coach. However, an official at the club asked about his name to issue a player I.D., and once he realized he is Christian, he simply told him: “Sorry, we cannot admit you into the team” (14).

Famous Art critic Tariq al-Shennawi raised a question in his column at Al-Masry Al-Youm newspaper about the reasons for Coptic absence in soccer, stating, “The undeniable fact is that there is a distinct Coptic absence in soccer. Are Muslim families no longer willing to let their children play soccer with the children of their Coptic neighbors?”(15).

Writer Osama Ghareib responded to this question in the same newspaper, “Copts are being excluded from soccer because they are being increasingly accused and labeled as infidels,” he explained, adding that “Exclusion from soccer is not the only repercussion, as the infidel label may make them targets for murder and rape…. Since the majority of sports officials in major clubs are newly religious, you will not find one among them who would welcome a Christian child even if his talent exceeded that of famous international footballer Messi “(16).

Mada Masr online Newspaper published an Arabic/English report on the marked exclusion of Copts from professional soccer in Egypt, highlighting a number of cases that were excluded for religious reasons (17, 18).

Writer Tawfiq Humaid called on international player Mohammed Salah to lend his support to the efforts to end religious bias in sports against Christian Egyptians. He reminded him that were he a Christian, he would not have had the opportunity to play professional soccer in Egypt; and on the other hand, if the Western World did not consider competence to be the sole criterion, Salah would not have achieved international status (19).

Islamization of Sports

The problem of Coptic absence from soccer teams reflects a wider phenomenon, namely the Islamization of Egyptian society, including sports. In Egypt, the national soccer team is known as “the kneeling team” i.e., those who kneel down to worship in the Islamic way. Former technical director of the Egyptian national team, Hassan Shehata, used to have a Muslim cleric accompany the team on international trips to recite the Quran. He once said in an interview that “a player’s relationship with God and his proper behavior are important factors when he selects players who represent Egypt internationally”(20).

In an article published in Al-Ahram newspaper, researcher Wahid Abdel-Majid criticized Shehata because of the way he mixed religion and sports (21).

This general push for Islamization is reflected in the pressure put on foreign non-Muslim coaches and players to convert to Islam. Some of them have already converted to Islam so as not to lose their jobs, while others refused to, including Ivorian footballer Coulibaly who left the Egyptian team, later stating that they wanted him to convert to Islam (22).

Islamization of sports was also manifested in such statements made by Al-Azhar Institution, “Every goal scored by Mohammad Salah promotes Islam in Europe, makes English people sing the praises of Islam, and changes the way Europeans view the [Islamic] beard” (23, 24).

Coptic Reaction to Discrimination in Sports

As frustrated Copts struggle to find a way around the prevalent discrimination in sports, their options remain limited. In fact, filing complaints is about the only thing they can do, given that all sports clubs are under the supervision of the Egyptian State, and consequently their exclusion from soccer is a State policy.

A book entitled “A Goal in the Playground of Fanaticism”, published in 2010, explored in detail the exclusion of Copts from Egyptian playgrounds. Nour Qaldis, the book’s author and a Christian journalist at Coptic newspaper Watani, highlighted a large number of cases where talents were rejected on religious grounds. The book reached the conclusion that discrimination against Copts in sports is a far-reaching phenomenon, and that preventing young Copts from joining youth teams is a strategy designed to ensure that no Copts will be able to qualify for official soccer teams (25).

The only option left to Coptic churches was to organize church tournaments in small playfields within these churches, which at least gave Copts the chance to practice. However, this option is still flawed, since these are small Playgrounds, lacking professional capabilities and the ability to nominate Coptic players for official clubs (26).

Last year, a young Christian man founded the “Je Suis” Academy as a way to bring together talented Copts who were rejected by major clubs. He rented soccer fields in remote areas, thus allowing them to develop their skills. However, limited resources remain a problem, as well as the unchanging attitude of professional clubs which continue to reject those talented players

Source

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የLiverpool ግብጻዊ ምን አስተማረን? | አንተ ግን ስትጸልይ፥ ወደ እልፍኝህ ግባ መዝጊያህንም ዘግተህ በስውር ላለው አባትህ ጸልይ

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on May 27, 2018

 

666

[ማቴዎስ ወንጌል ምዕራፍ ፮፮]

በቅዳሜው የኪየቭ ቻምፒየንስ ሊግ መጨረሻ ጨዋታ ላይ የ Liverpool እግር ኳስ ቡደን መርሆ፡ “ Reds, Bring Home Number Six!„ „ቀዮች፤ ቁጥር ስድስትን (6) ይዛችሁ ኑ!የሚል ነበር።

ግን አልተሳካላቸውም፤ ለአላህ ለሰው ይታይ ዘንድ የጸለየው ግብዙ ግብጻዊ “ሞ ሳላህ” ወይም መሀመድ ሳላህ (ሞ ፋራህ ን እናስታውሳለን?) መሰናክል ሆናቸው።

ሞ ሳላህ በማን እጅ ወደቀ? በማድሪዱ ሰርጂዮ ራሞስ እጅ። ሰርጂዮ ራሞስ ለ600 ዓመታት ያህል አረብ ሙስሊሞችን ታግላ እስልምናን ሙሉ በሙሉ ካጠፋችው ከአንዳሉሲያ ስፔይን ክፍለሃገር የተገኘ ስፖርተኛ ነው።

የማቴዎስ ወንጌል ቁጥሩም፤ 6:6፤ ይጠቁመናል

አንተ ግን ስትጸልይ፥ ወደ እልፍኝህ ግባ መዝጊያህንም ዘግተህ በስውር ላለው አባትህ ጸልይ፤ በስውር የሚያይ አባትህም በግልጥ ይከፍልሃል።

[የማቴዎስ ወንጌል ምዕራፍ ፮፥፭፡፯}

ስትጸልዩም እንደ ግብዞች አትሁኑ፤ ለሰው ይታዩ ዘንድ በምኩራብና በመንገድ ማዕዘን ቆመው መጸለይን ይወዳሉና፤ እውነት እላችኋለሁ፥ ዋጋቸውን ተቀብለዋል።

አንተ ግን ስትጸልይ፥ ወደ እልፍኝህ ግባ መዝጊያህንም ዘግተህ በስውር ላለው አባትህ ጸልይ፤ በስውር የሚያይ አባትህም በግልጥ ይከፍልሃል። አሕዛብም በመናገራቸው ብዛት እንዲሰሙ ይመስላቸዋልና ስትጸልዩ እንደ እነርሱ በከንቱ አትድገሙ።

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Posted in Curiosity, Ethiopia, Faith, Infotainment | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Saudi Football Team Refused To Take Part In A Minute’s Silence For London Victims

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 9, 2017

The Team Said The Minute’s Silence Was Not In Keeping With Saudi Culture.

The Saudi Arabia national football team has been labeled “disgraceful” after it refused to take part in a minute’s silence for the victims of the recent terror attacks in England.

Shortly before the team’s World Cup qualifier match against Australia on Thursday evening at the Adelaide Oval, the stadium announcer called for a minute’s silence. The Australian national team linked arms at the halfway line, only for the Saudis to walk around separately in their own half.

A statement released by Football Federation Australia after the game said Saudi officials had agreed to let the minute’s silence go ahead, but also said that the tradition was “not in keeping with Saudi culture”.

Both the AFC and the Saudi team agreed that the minute of silence could be held. The FFA was further advised by Saudi team officials that this tradition was not in keeping with Saudi culture and they would move to their side of the field and respect our custom whilst taking their own positions on the field,” said the statement.

Labor senator Anthony Albonese called the scenes a “disgraceful lack of respect” on the Today show on Friday morning.

“That was a disgraceful lack of respect not just for the two Australians killed, one of whom was a young South Australians, all of those victims of that terror attack in London,” he said.

“There is no excuse here. This isn’t about culture, this is about a lack of respect. I thought it was disgraceful.”

The incident caused a huge reaction on social media.

Islamic Sheikh: ‘In Their Eyes The Attackers Are Martyrs’

An Islamic imam has suggested the Saudi Arabian team refused to take part in a minute’s silence for the London terror victims because they believe ‘it is not a sin for a Muslim to kill a non-believer’.

Sheikh Mohammad Tawhidi says it is a ‘lie’ to say the Muslim culture does not remember the dead with a moment of silence, and instead argues the football team did not partake in the mourning because they stand with the jihadist men.

‘They did not stop for a moment of silence because according to Wahhabi Islam – which governs Saudi Arabia – it is not wrong or a sin for a Muslim to kill a non-Muslim,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

Continue reading…

Saudi Arabia Is Threatening To Wrest The World Cup From Qatar, Proving Its Outsize Strength On The World Stage.

Pakistani Christians in Sindh province are demanding justice after a 35-year-old sanitation worker died, having been exposed to toxic sewage and refused medical care by Muslim doctors who refused to touch his “unclean” body during Ramadan.

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UEFA Euro 2016: Another Reflection of A Dying Decadent Society

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 11, 2016

Congratulation to Portugal – They deserve it after many years of sacrifice

Generally speaking, the quality of the matches was very low. The final was between Africa N°1 & Africa N°2. Even the presence of “African” players couldn’t help to spice up the lame championships.

It looks as though, these rich dudes who’re paid millions do not seem to have the motivation and the hunger for success. The players all look like lame duck squawkers; spoiled, emasculated, de-spiritualised, impotent, selfish, ungrateful, and spiteful – just the exact reflection of Western societies.

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Dutch Orange Fan Drives From US to Brazil

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 13, 2014

Posted in Curiosity, Infotainment | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Could This 11-Year-old Soccer Player Be The Next Leo Messi?

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 31, 2012

His name is Cassiano Bouzon Jesus, he’s from Brazil, and he has already been Signed by FC Barcelona, as Messi had been when he was 13 years old

It is known that Spanish giants pick up the best talents across the planet and nurture them in their club academy La Masia. This time the scouting mission went online as FC Barcelona found a video of a 11 year old boy from Brazil, Cassiano Bouzon, showing off his skills.

Impressed with the youngster, Barҫa offered a 20 day trial at their feeder club Cornella. And rumours suggest that the boy will be a future Barcelona youth player.

“I play with the ball glued to my feet. I dribble a lot. I’m fast,” Bouzon told reporters as he touched down in Brazil after impressing Barcelona.

Watch the video of Cassiano Bouzon, showing off his talents from the left hand side of the field

 

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Money Rankings: Soccer Vs. Football

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 17, 2012

እስፖርት ጥሩ ነገር ነው፡ ግን ገንዘብና ዝና ላሰከራቸው ታዋቂ ቡድኖች ወገኖቻችን ቴሊቪዥንና ሪዲዮ ጋር ተጣብቀው ልባቸው እስኪወጣ ሲጋደሉ ሳይ ግርም ይለኛል፤ አዝናለሁ፤ ያውም ለሚያንቋሽሹንና ለማይወዱን እንግሊዞች! የአዲስ አበባ ወጣት የሳምንቱን መጨረሻ የሚያሳልፈው ከነ ማንቸስተር ጋር ሆኗል፤ አንዳንዴ ምናለ ለነ ኃይሌ ገብረስላሤ፤ ለነጥሩነሽ ዲባባ የልባቸው ትርታ ያን ያህል ከፍ ቢል እላለሁ።

Manchester United lost the Premier League title on the last day of the season in heartbreaking fashion, when rival Manchester City scored a last-minute goal to defeat Queens Park Rangers and clinch its first title ever in May. Man City’s win prevented Manchester United from winning a second straight Premier League title–and record 20th overall–disappointing the team’s 659 million fans around the world.

The Red Devils still lay claim to another title, though: The world’s most valuable sports team. Forbes estimates Manchester United is now worth 2.23 , 19% more than No. 2 Real Madrid, which is worth 1.88 .

Soccer clubs hold the top two spots among the world’s most valuable franchises, but it is American football teams that dominate the rest of the top 50.

Continue reading…

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Rank

Team

Type

Country

Value in Billion $

Manchester United

Soccer

England

2.23

Real Madrid

Soccer

Spain

1.88

New York Yankees

Baseball

USA

1.85

Dallas Cowboys

American Football

USA

1.85

Washington Redskins

American Football

USA

1.56

Los Angeles Dodgers

Baseball

USA

1.4

New England Patriots

American Football

USA

1.4

FC Barcelona

American Football

Spain

1.31

New York Giants

American

Football

USA

1.3

 10.

Arsenal

Soccer

England

1.29

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Posted in Curiosity, Ethiopia, Infotainment | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

I Am Not Haile – Haile Gebreselassie

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 28, 2012

My note: Gebre Selassie is a common Christian name across Ethiopia. According to the German phone book registration, there are about 24 Gebre Selassies in Germany.

Like the vast majority of Ethiopian names, the origin of the name, Gebreselassie / Gebre Selassie has an Ethiopian Christian origin.

  • Gebreselassie is a composition of two words; Gebre and Selassie.
  • Gebre means Servant; Criado / Siervo (Spanish)
  • Selassie means Trinity; Trinidad (Spanish)

In the Spanish speaking world “Trinidad Criado” or “Siervo de Díos” are also widely used names.

  • Gebre Egziabher = Servant of God / Siervo de Díos (Spanish)
  • Gebre Mariam = Servant of Mary / Siervo de Maria (Spanish)
  • Haile Selassie = Power of The Trinity / Poder de la Trinidad (Spanish)
  • Haile Mariam = Power of Mary
  • Selassie = Trinity (as in the Holy Trinity)
    Haile = My Power
  • Haile Gebreselassie = My power, Servant of The Trinity

Now, back to Theodor Gebre Selassie:

Gebre Selassie out to establish himself

“I want to assert myself as soon as possible in the Bundesliga, which is one of the best leagues in the world,” said the 25-year-old at his official presentation on Tuesday.

Selassie: “I immediately accepted”

Selassie was a key player in his country’s participation at EURO 2012, nullifying the threat of Cristiano Ronaldo for large periods of their quarter-final tie last Thursday, before the Portuguese struck the winner late on. For Selassie, the chance to play in Germany’s top-flight was too good to resist: “I immediately and happily accepted Bremen’s offer,” said the defender, who will now take a two-week holiday before returning for pre-season training in mid-July.

The son of a Czech teacher and an Ethiopian doctor, Selassie insists his father did not name him after his compatriot and world renowned distance runner Haile Gebrselassie, as was widely reported during the European Championship. “That sounds nice, but it’s not true. Gebre Selassie is the name I was born with.”

 

Source: Bundesliga Germany

 

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Greek Priest Punished for Hooliganism

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 9, 2010


Vuvuzela  fever?

A Greek priest has been punished by the Orthodox Church for hooliganism after he was spotted among crowds of chanting football fans.

Priest Christos, who is in his sixties, was a fervent supporter of Greek football team PAOK FC, whose fans are notorious for being among the most violent in Greece.

He would attend games dressed in his robes and a club scarf, earning him the nickname Papa Paok.

The priest earned notoriety after videos of him were posted on YouTube in the middle of a throng of supporters who were insulting an opposition team, and another showed a crowd chanting “The priest is a God”.

The clerical commission in his parish, in a Thessaloniki suburb, demoted the priest and ordered not to take part in any more “uncouth gatherings of supporters”.

The decision has angered PAOK fans, who organized a Facebook campaign entitled “Free Papa Paok” which has 7,500 members.

In a press release fans denounced the decision, saying the priest carried out the “social and spiritual work of the Church on behalf of the people” and accused the Orthodox Church of a “fascist and reactionary approach”.

Local Greek Orthodox priests bless Greece’s national football team

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World Cup in the Vuvuzela (ንቡዜማ) Pot

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 8, 2010

The biggest sporting event in the history of Africa is to take place over the next couple of weeks.

I think the awarding of the FIFA world cup to the African Continent which has often been suspect and thought of negatively by the world media, for the first time, is quite historic – the right thing to do – a very positive gesture – one major morale boost for Africa. The FIFA World Cup is the second biggest sporting event in the world after the Olympics.

The whole of Africa has been looking forward to this big event get started on the 11th of June 2010.

Somebody says, “Love is my religion” another one, “Music is my religion”, but, during the coming four weeks, many would say, “Football is our religion”. Indeed, football generates very powerful emotions – nationalism, hero-worship – these are all elements of religion. It is a quasi-religion in many ways, even if it is more like a simple human game – an entertainment.

First of all, the World Cup is about hospitality, at least from an African point of view because it’s coming to Africa. The wider world will surely be acquainted with the warm and joyful African hospitality. At the end of the games everyone will be wearing shirts with Africa motives and carrying around a VUVUZELA (ንቡዜማa traditional South African stadium horn )

Everyone will acknowledge the fact that Africa unjustly continues to be heard and seen in ways that Africa would not want to be heard and seen. Everyone, even its critics, will take the Vuvuzela sound around the stadiums as a desperate attempt by Africa to be heard. Yes, it’s a very loud instrument, and probably much louder when you have thousands of people playing them. But here is a continent which continues to cry out for recognition, for dignity, to be interpreted positively. I am sure everyone will get used to it, as we’re in for for a peaceful and magnificent World Cup, for a festival of football

South Africa 2010 Match Schedule

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Posted in Ethiopia, Infotainment | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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