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Posts Tagged ‘NPR’

US warns Ethiopia of ‘Dehumanizing Rhetoric’ on Tigray – Samantha Power to NPR

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on August 6, 2021

After Ethiopia Trip, USAID Administrator Samantha Power Shares View Of Conflict.

Abiy Ahmed’s Brutal Campaign Against the People of Tigray Pushes Ethiopia to the brink.

Samantha Power Has Long Championed Humanitarian Intervention. Ethiopia’s Crisis Is Putting Her to The Test.

On the day Samantha Power landed in Ethiopia this week, its civil war — now escalating and spreading beyond the northern region of Tigray — entered its 10th month.

Amid allegations that Ethiopian troops and their allies have committed war crimes and ethnic cleansing and have driven parts of Tigray into famine, the United States has already withheld security assistance and effectively banned travel for top officials.

But Power, who is in charge of the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID, holds the biggest American lever of influence over Addis Ababa: more than $1 billion in annual aid ranging from health and education support to food and emergency humanitarian response, which makes the United States the largest aid donor to Ethiopia.

It’s a moment seemingly made for Power, the former U.N. ambassador under President Barack Obama who came to prominence in 2002 with her book “A Problem From Hell,” which excoriated American inaction during mass killings in Rwanda and the Balkans in the 1990s, Europe during World War II and the Ottoman Empire during World War I.

“Samantha Power is a world-renowned voice of conscience and moral clarity — challenging and rallying the international community to stand up for the dignity and humanity of all people,” President Biden said in a statement when he appointed her.

Her work inspired a generation of humanitarian activists and helped popularize the notion that Washington bore a unique responsibility to protect the world’s most vulnerable populations, including with military force if necessary.

Power’s one-day trip Wednesday to Ethiopia, which didn’t include a meeting with Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, was a test of whether she can restore faith in America’s role in preventing mass atrocities beyond its borders. So far, the U.S. measures curtailing security assistance and sanctioning officials have had little effect beyond turning Ethiopian sentiment against Washington.

“The United States has been working in Ethiopia for 60 years. USAID has spent a billion dollars in the last year in this country, including several hundred million dollars in development assistance. We’re delivering tomorrow 1.4 million vaccines,” Power said in a phone interview from the airport in Addis Ababa as she wrapped up her visit.

“There is so much we want to do together, but this is an own-goal,” she added, referring to the government’s increasingly antagonistic attitude to humanitarian aid groups, journalists and allies in the West.

Unable to control Tigray, Ethiopia isolates region already beset by famine and war

Ethiopia’s government accuses those allies of failing to back its military offensive against the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, a group the government has designated as terrorists but whom the West dealt with over three decades when the TPLF controlled the country before Abiy’s rise.

Top Ethiopian officials have also accused some international aid groups of not just siding with the TPLF but also helping smuggle arms to it, and they have alleged that Western governments and media have overplayed atrocities linked to Ethiopian government forces while overlooking those allegedly committed by the TPLF.

Addis Ababa has responded defensively to allegations that it has committed crimes against civilians and hindered aid. The government puts nearly all the blame on the TPLF.

Inside the Biden administration, the option of using military force to stop the bloodshed in Tigray is seen as a non-starter. But withdrawing substantial amounts of aid is also seen as a poor option, because it is unlikely to change the Ethiopian government’s war strategy and instead deepen what is already one of the world’s most dire humanitarian crises.

Pressed on how and when punitive measures on aid might come into play, Power said she was still in wait-and-see mode. As for what she achieved at her meetings in Addis Ababa, she said she only got more commitments.

“It’s not the kind of track record that would give one confidence yet that those commitments are imminently to be met,” she said. Her requests were in line with the State Department’s recent public statements: that humanitarian aid be unhindered in delivery and that government-aligned troops from neighboring Eritrea as well as militias from the country’s Amhara region withdraw beyond Tigray’s prewar borders.

The State Department has also called on Tigrayan forces to withdraw from the Amhara and Afar regions, where they have recently gone on the offensive, displacing around a quarter of a million civilians.

“If we do not see progress in these domains, I think the administration made clear that we will not be left with much of a choice,” she said. The European Union has already withdrawn most of its financial support for aid programs in Ethiopia.

The outlook in Ethiopia is decidedly grim. The government initially pushed the TPLF out of Tigray’s main towns, but the TPLF retook most of the region last month in an offensive that analysts say resulted in a large portion of the Ethiopian army being killed or captured.

The TPLF has since moved into neighboring regions with the stated objective of obliterating what’s left of the government and its allies’ military capacity. On Thursday, Reuters reported that the TPLF had taken control of Lalibela, a sizable town within the Amhara region and home to Ethiopia’s famed 12th-century rock-hewed churches.

The Ethiopian government has in turn sought to recruit widely from regional militias, drawing in fighters from parts of the country previously uninvolved in the conflict.

Asked at a news conference in Addis Ababa about Abiy’s recent use of words like “weeds,” “cancer” and “disease” to refer to the TPLF, Power cautioned that “there are many, many people out there who hear rhetoric, hateful rhetoric or dehumanizing rhetoric and take measures into their own hands.”

Power’s past advocacy for humanitarian intervention, including with U.S. military force, has fallen out of favor in recent years as public confidence in Washington’s ability to reshape distant lands wanes. U.S. forces will conclude a 20-year occupation in Afghanistan in September, and the military will formally end combat operations in Iraq by the end of the year, Biden said last week. The two missions have cost thousands of lives, trillions of dollars and fallen far short of U.S. ambitions to bring about stability, democracy or prosperity. The protracted chaos and bloodshed in Libya following the ouster of Moammar Gaddafi in a NATO-led military operation in 2011 also dampened the appeal of humanitarian interventions.

Defenders of the administration say its lack of bold action in confronting the Ethiopian crisis does not indicate a lack of concern.

“There is a false narrative that the Biden administration does not care about mass atrocities, fueled by its decision to risk mass violence in Afghanistan,” said Richard Gowan, a U.N. analyst at the International Crisis Group. “But if you look at Washington’s approach to Ethiopia in particular, you see that the new administration does still have strong humanitarian instincts.”

Power, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield and the U.S. special envoy for the Horn of Africa, Jeffrey Feltman, “have all thrown themselves into efforts to halt the Tigrayan war, which hardly seemed to register with the outgoing Trump team,” Gowan said.

Thomas-Greenfield took to Twitter on Wednesday to denounce the Ethiopian government’s decision this week to revoke the operating licenses of Doctors Without Borders and the Norwegian Refugee Council, two humanitarian organizations known for their work in war zones.

“This suspension is unacceptable. I know the work of MSF and NRC well, and they are internationally respected,” she wrote, using the French abbreviation for Doctors Without Borders. “Ethiopia must reconsider this decision.”

At least a dozen aid workers have been killed since November, when Abiy sent troops to Tigray to fight the TPLF after the group allegedly staged an attack on a military base.

The United Nations says the war has left 400,000 people facing famine, while UNICEF estimated last week that more than 100,000 children in Tigray could suffer from life-threatening acute malnutrition in the next 12 months — 10 times the annual average.

Meanwhile, “supplies are just running out,” Power said.

Source

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#Tigray | An Astonishing Level of Human Suffering, With Sexual Violence Being Used as Weapon of War

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on May 12, 2021

👉 አስገራሚ የሰዎች ሥቃይ ደረጃ፤ የጾታዊ ጥቃት እንደ ጦር መሣሪያነት ጥቅም ላይ እየዋለ ነው።

🔥 “ሰብአዊነት እንደወደቀ ሆኖ ይሰማኛል”

🔥 “It Feels Like Humanity Has Collapsed😠😠😠 😢😢😢

💭 በኢትዮጵያ የእርስ በእርስ ጦርነት ምክንያት ከተፈጠረው የሰብዓዊ ቀውስ ጀርባ

💭 Behind The Humanitarian Crisis Caused By The Civil War In Ethiopia

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Posted in Ethiopia, Health, Infos, Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

NY Times: ‘They Told Us Not to Resist’: Sexual Violence Pervades Ethiopia’s War

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 1, 2021

From The New York Times

👉 ገብርኤል 👉 ማርያም 👉 ኡራኤል 👉 ጊዮርጊስ 👉 ተክለ ሐይማኖት 👉 ዮሴፍ 👉መድኃኔ ዓለም

ይህ የዘር ማጽዳት ነው። ወታደሮችየትግራይን ሴቶች የሚያጠቋቸው፤ የበለጠ ትግራዋያንን ለመውለድ እንዲያቆሙ ነው

☆ በታዋቂው የሞና ሊዛ ሥዕል ስም የተሰየመችው የ ፲፰/18 ዓመቷ ኢትዮጵያዊ የሁለተኛ ደረጃ ት / ቤት ምሩቅ ከሰባት የጥይት ቁስሎች እና ከተቆረጠ ክንድ ጋር ከደረሰባት አስገድዶ መድፈር በሕይወት መትረፍ ችላለች።

☆ እ.ኤ.አ. በታህሳስ ወር መጀመሪያ ላይ ሞና ሊዛ እንዳለቸውት አንድ ኢትዮጵያዊ ወታደር በማዕከላዊ ትግራይ ውስጥ በአቢ አድዲ ውስጥ ከአያቷ ጋር በምትጋራበት ቤት ውስጥ ገብቶ ወሲብ እንዲፈጽሙ አዘዛቸው፡፡

☆ ሞና ሊዛ፡ የኦርቶዶክስ እምነት ተከታይ የሆኑት አያቷ ለወታደሩ “እባክህ ይህ በእኛ ዘንድ ያልተለመደ እና ከሃይማኖታዊ እምነታችን ጋር የሚጋጭ ነው።” ሲሉ መስማቷን ታስታውሳለች።

☆ በፆታዊ ጥቃት ወቅት ድንጋዮች ፣ ጥፍሮች እና ሌሎች ነገሮች በሴቶች ሃፍረተ ስጋ አካላቸው ውስጥ መገኘቱን የጤና ሰራተኞች ጠቁመዋል፡፡ ሴቶች የራሳቸውን የቤተሰብ አባላት ለመድፈር መገደዳቸውም ተገልጿል፡፡

☆ በመቀሌ ከተማ የትግራይ ሴቶች ማህበር የሚያስተዳድረው ለሴቶች ደህንነት የተጠበቀ ቤት አባል የሆኑት ለታይ ተስፋይ፤ “አስገድዶ መድፈር ለጦር መሳሪያነት እያገለገለ ነው፤ እየሆነ ያለው ነገር ለማሰብ እንኳን የሚከብድ ነው፡፡” ብለዋል።

☆ አንዲት ሴት “ብንጮህም እንኳ የሚሰማን የለም” ብላለች። “መቁጠር እንኳን አቅቶናል፤ ደፋሪዎቹ ፎቶ አንስተውና ሰውነቴ ላይ አልኮል ካፈሰሱብኝ በኋላ እርስበርስ ተሳሳቁብኝ፡፡ አጥቂዎቹ የ ፲፪/12 ዓመት ወንድ ልጇን በጥይት እንደገደሉባት አክላለች፡፡

☆ “ግን የአካባቢው ፖሊሶች እና የፌደራል ፖሊሶች ባሉበት ትናንትም ዛሬም ሴቶች እየተደፈሩ ነው፡፡”

💭 የቀድሞው ጠቅላይ ሚንስትር መለስ ዜናዊ በአንድ ወቅት “ኦሮሞ ሀገር ማስተዳደር አይችልም! ብለው ነበር። ሌላ ጊዜም “ለኦሮሞ ስልጣን መስጠት ለህፃን ውሀ በብርጭቆ መስጠት ነው” ብለው ነበር። 100% ትክክል ነበሩ! ታዲያ ይህን እያወቁ እነ አቶ ስብሐት ነጋ ሁሉንም ነገር ለኦሮሞዎች አስረክበው መቀሌ ገቡ። ትልቅ ወንጀል! ያው ከኦሮማራዎችና የኤርትራ ቤን አሚር ጋር በመመሳጠርና ተክትለዋቸውም በመምጣት በትግራይ ሕዝብ ላይ አስከፊ ግፍና በደል ይፈጽማሉ።

ዛሬ ኦሮሞዎቹ ብርጭቆውን መስበር ብቻ አይደለም፤ በዓለምም በኢትዮጵያም ታሪክ ይህን ያህል በአስከፊ መልክ ዘግናኝ፣ ታይቶም ተሰምቶም የማይታወቅ ወንጀል እየፈጸሙ ነው። ጋሎች ከማደጋስካር እና ታንዛኒያ አካባቢ አምልጠው/ተባርረው ውደ ምስራቅ አፍሪቃ ሲገቡ ለአፍሪቃ ቀንድ እራሳቸው መጤዎች የሆኑት ሶማሌዎች እንኳን ሳይቀሩ የጋሎችን አረመኔነት ስለተገነዘቡት ነበር ዛሬ ወደሰፈሩበት የአክሱም ግዛት ገብተው እንዲወርሩና እንዲስፋፉ ያደረጓቸው። ኢትዮጵያ ሀገሬ ሞኝ ነሽ ተላላ የሞተልሽ ቀርቶ የገደለሽ በላ!

❖ ❖ ❖ አብ ወልድ መንፈስ ቅዱስ ሆይ በስማችሁ ብዙ ተአምራትን ያደረገና ኮከብ ክብርየተባለ የሰማዕታት አለቃ በሚሆን በኃያሉ በቅዱስ ጊዮርጊስ ላይ ለመፍረድ በልዳ ሀገር የተሰበሰቡትን ፯(ሰብዓ)ነገሥታትን ደምስሰው እንዳጠፏቸው፡ የተነሱብንን የጽዮንን ተቃዋሚዎች፣ የኔንም/የኛንም ጠላቶች ሁሉ ይደመስሱልን ዘንድ እማፀናለሁ። አሜን! አሜን! አሜን!❖ ❖ ❖

☆ “This is ethnic cleansing. Soldiers are targeting Tigrayan women to stop them giving birth to more Tigrayans.

☆ Mona Lisa, named for the iconic painting, the 18-year-old Ethiopian high school graduate had survived an attempted rape that left her with seven gunshot wounds and an amputated arm.

☆ In early December, Ms. Mona said, an Ethiopian soldier burst into the house she shares with her grandfather in Abiy Addi, a town in central Tigray, and ordered them to have sex.

☆ “Please,” she recalled her grandfather, an Orthodox Christian, telling the soldier. “This is abnormal and against our religious beliefs.”

☆ Rocks, nails and other objects have been forced inside the bodies of women — and some men — during sexual assaults, according to health workers. Men have been forced to rape their own family members under threat of violence, Pramila Patten, the top U.N. official on sexual violence in conflict, said in January.

☆ “Rape is being used as a weapon of war,” said Letay Tesfay of the Tigray Women’s Association, which runs a safe house for women in Mekelle. “What’s happening is unimaginable.”

☆ “Even if we had shouted,” one woman said, “there was no one to listen.”

☆ “I lost count,” she said. “They took photos of me, poured alcohol on me and laughed.” Some of her assailants also shot dead her 12-year-old son, she added.

☆ “But women were raped yesterday and today when the local police and federal police are around.”

‘They Told Us Not to Resist’: Sexual Violence Pervades Ethiopia’s War

Rape is being used as a weapon as fighting rages in remote parts of Tigray region. “Even if we had shouted,” one woman said, “there was no one to listen.”

Mona Lisa lay on a hospital bed in Mekelle, the main city in war-torn northern Ethiopia, her body devastated but her defiance on display.

Named for the iconic painting, the 18-year-old Ethiopian high school graduate had survived an attempted rape that left her with seven gunshot wounds and an amputated arm. She wanted it to be known that she had resisted.

“This is ethnic cleansing,” she said. “Soldiers are targeting Tigrayan women to stop them giving birth to more Tigrayans.”

Her account is one of hundreds detailing abuses in Tigray, the mountainous region in northern Ethiopia where a grinding civil war has been accompanied by a parallel wave of atrocities including widespread sexual assault targeting women.

A senior United Nations official told the Security Council last week that more than 500 Ethiopian women had formally reported sexual violence in Tigray, although the actual toll is likely far higher, she added. In the city of Mekelle, health workers say new cases emerge every day.

The assaults have become a focus of growing international outrage about a conflict where the fighting is largely happening out of sight, in the mountains and the countryside. But evidence of atrocities against civilians — mass shootings, looting, sexual assault — is everywhere.

In early December, Ms. Mona said, an Ethiopian soldier burst into the house she shares with her grandfather in Abiy Addi, a town in central Tigray, and ordered them to have sex.

“Please,” she recalled her grandfather, an Orthodox Christian, telling the soldier. “This is abnormal and against our religious beliefs.”

When her grandfather refused, the soldier shot him in the leg and locked him into the kitchen. Then he pinned Ms. Mona to a sofa and tried to rape her. She fought back, kicking the man in the crotch and briefly grabbing his gun, she said.

But he quickly overpowered her and, after shooting her in the hand and firing warning shots into the floor, issued another ultimatum. “He said he would count to three and if I did not take off my clothes he would kill me,” she said.

The soldier fired a volley of bullets that cut through Ms. Mona’s right arm and right leg. By the time she got transportation to the Mekelle General Hospital a day later, doctors were forced to amputate the arm.

She is still in the hospital, the bones in one leg still shattered. An uncle at her bedside corroborated her account of the assault on Dec. 4. Ms. Mona, who consented to be identified, called it a calculated act of war.

“My case is not unique,” she said. “I fought the soldier off. But there are so many women all over this region who were actually raped.”

After months of increasingly desperate pleas for international action on Ethiopia, led by senior United Nations and European Union officials, the pressure appears to be producing results. President Biden recently sent an envoy, Senator Chris Coons, Democrat of Delaware, to Ethiopia for talks with Ethiopia’s prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, that lasted five hours.

The majority of sexual violence accusations in Tigray have been leveled against Ethiopian and allied Eritrean soldiers. But Tigrayan forces may also be guilty of war crimes, the top U.N. human rights official, Michele Bachelet, said this month.

In some ways, the bitter fight is driven by deeply rooted forces — longstanding land disputes, opposing visions over the future shape of Ethiopia, and a rivalry with Eritrea going back decades. But civilians, and particularly women, are bearing the brunt of the most disturbing violence.

Rocks, nails and other objects have been forced inside the bodies of women — and some men — during sexual assaults, according to health workers. Men have been forced to rape their own family members under threat of violence, Pramila Patten, the top U.N. official on sexual violence in conflict, said in January.

“Rape is being used as a weapon of war,” said Letay Tesfay of the Tigray Women’s Association, which runs a safe house for women in Mekelle. “What’s happening is unimaginable.”

The epidemic of sexual assault is exacerbated by a collapsing health system. Many victims have contracted sexually transmitted diseases, including H.I.V., doctors say. Demand for abortions and emergency contraceptives has risen.

But outside the main towns of Tigray, most health clinics are shut — some destroyed in fighting, others plundered by soldiers as part of what Doctors Without Borders recently called a concerted effort to destroy the region’s health care system. In his meeting with Mr. Abiy in March, Senator Coons said they discussed “directly and forcefully” the reports of widespread human rights violations including rape.

Whether Mr. Abiy delivers on his promise of bringing the perpetrators to justice, he added, “is going to be critical to any successful resolution of this conflict.”

The anguish of victims resonates quietly through the wards of the Ayder Referral Hospital in Mekelle, the region’s biggest medical facility.

A doctor specialized in sexual assault said he had received at least three new patients every day since Ethiopian troops marched into Mekelle on Nov. 28. Some said they had been raped by soldiers in the camps for displaced people on the edge of the city; others were abducted from their homes in rural areas and held for days as soldiers repeatedly raped them.

The doctor, who like several other medics spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals from the authorities, produced a list of 18 registered sexual violence patients at the hospital. The youngest was 14. Most said their attackers were soldiers, he said.

In one bed, a 29-year old woman who asked to be identified only by her first name, Helen, trembled as she recounted how Eritrean and Ethiopian troops had tied her to a tree near her home in Agula, 15 miles north of Mekelle, and assaulted her repeatedly over a 10-day period in late November.

“I lost count,” she said. “They took photos of me, poured alcohol on me and laughed.” Some of her assailants also shot dead her 12-year-old son, she added.

Selam Assaeffae, a police investigator working on rape cases at the Ayder Referral Hospital, corroborated Ms. Helen’s account.

Most sexual assault cases in Tigray, however, may not be recorded anywhere. Health workers said that officials are reluctant to register such violence, fearing that the military could target them for documenting the crime. Patients often remain anonymous for the same reason.

Filsan Abdullahi Ahmed, Ethiopia’s minister of women, children and youth, insisted that the federal government was taking seriously the reports of sexual violence in Tigray, and had sent a task force including social workers, police officers and prosecutors to investigate.

While her own mandate was limited to providing victims with psychological support, Ms. Filsan said she had pressured Ethiopia’s attorney general to deliver justice. But it is a difficult process, she insisted.

“I cannot 100 percent confirm whom this is being committed by,” Ms. Filsan said, referring to the perpetrators.

The sexual attacks are so common that even some Ethiopian soldiers have spoken out. At a public meeting in Mekelle in January, a man in military uniform made an outburst that was broadcast on state television.

“I was angry yesterday,” he said. “Why does a woman get raped in Mekelle city?” The soldier, who was not identified, questioned why the police weren’t stopping them. “It wouldn’t be shocking if it happened during fighting,” he said. “But women were raped yesterday and today when the local police and federal police are around.”

Haben, a waitress in Mekelle, was raped with two other women at the cafe where they work in December, she said. Her body is still covered in bruises from the assault.

“They told us not to resist,” she recalled. “‘Lie down. Don’t shout.’”

But even if they had shouted, she added, “there was nobody to listen.”

Source

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Posted in Ethiopia, Health, Infos, Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

NPR | The Case of PM Abiy Ahmed | What is Happening in Tigray is Worse Than War

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on March 22, 2021

🔥 A Nobel Peace Laureate and Horror in Ethiopia

🔥 የኖቤል የሰላም ተሸላሚ እና አስፈሪ ሰቆቃ በኢትዮጵያ

👉 የጠ / ሚ አብይ አህመድ ጉዳይ | በትግራይ እየሆነ ያለው ከጦርነት የከፋ ነው

🔥 ዛሬ ኢትዮጵያ በሀገሪቱ ሰሜናዊ ክፍል በጦርነት በምትገኘዋ ትግራይ ምክኒያት እንደገና በዜና ውስጥ አለች። እዚያ እየሆነ ያለው ከጦርነት የከፋ ነው ፥ ትግራይ የጦር ወንጀልና በሰው ልጆች ላይ የሚፈጸሙ ወንጀሎች ቲያትር ናት።

🔥 አስገድዶ መድፈር ከረጅም ጊዜ በፊት የጦር መሣሪያ ሆኖ ቆይቷል ፥ በሱዳን ፣ በባልካን ፣ በበርማ እና በሌሎች በርካታ ቦታዎች። በትግራይ በጅምላ መድፈር እጅግ ዘግናኝ በሆነ ደረጃ ላይ ይገኛል። እ... ጃንዋሪ 21 አንድ የተባበሩት መንግስታት ባለስልጣን ፕራሚላ ፓተን መግለጫ ሰጡ። የተባበሩት መንግስታት “በግጭቶች ውስጥ ወሲባዊ ጥቃት” በሚለው ርዕስ ጉዳይ ላይ “ልዩ ተወካይ” ነች። የእርሷን መግለጫ የመጀመሪያዎቹን ሁለት ዓረፍተ ነገሮችን ብቻ እጠቅሳለሁ፦

በትግራይ ዋና ከተማ በመቐለ ከፍተኛ ቁጥር ያላቸው አስገድዶ መድፈርን ጨምሮ ከባድ የወሲብ ጥቃቶች መከሰታቸው በጣም አሳስቦኛል። በቅርቡም “የኃይል እርምጃ ይወሰድባችኋል” የተባሉ ግለሰቦችም በማስፈራራት የገዛ ቤተሰቦቻቸውን ለመድፈር ተገደዋል የሚሉ የሚረብሹ ዘገባዎች አሉ።”

🔥 ለትግራይ ሲኦል ተጠያቂው ማነው? ጠቅላይ ሚኒስትሩ ፣ የኖቤል የሰላም ተሸላሚ? የጥፋተኝነት ምደባ ብዙ የመተንተን ገጾችን ይወስዳል። በትግራይ እና በውጭው ዓለም መካከል ያለው የግንኙነት መቆራረጥ እና የሰብዓዊ ዕርዳታ መዘግየትን ለክልሉ በጣም አስፈላጊ በመሆኑ ፣ በብዙዎች ዘንድ ዋናው ተጠያቂ አብይ አህመድ እንደሆነ ግልጽ ነው። ብዙዎች የአብይ የኖቤል የሰላም ሽልማት እንዲሰረዝ/ እንዲሻር ጥሪ እያደረጉ ነው።

🔥 የኖርዌይ የኖቤል ኮሚቴ ዛሬ ፊቱ ላይ እንቁላል አለበት። ከበርማዋ ጠቅላይ ሚንስትር ኦንግ ሳን ሱ ኪይ ጎን ለጎን የኮሚቴው የ 2019 ተሸላሚ ይህንን ነፍሰ ገዳይ እና ጭራቃዊ/ አሰቃቂ ጭፍጨፋ በትግራይ እየመራ ነው። ግን የ 2019 ሽልማት በኖቤል ውሎች ትርጉም አለው።

🔥 የኖርዌይ የኖቤል ኮሚቴ ዛሬ ፊቱ ላይ እንቁላል አለበት። ከበርማዋ ጠቅላይ ሚንስትር ኦንግ ሳን ሱ ኪይ ጎን ለጎን የኮሚቴው የ 2019 ተሸላሚ ይህንን ነፍሰ ገዳይ እና ጭራቃዊ/ አሰቃቂ ጭፍጨፋ በትግራይ እየመራ ነው።

🔥 በትግራይ ያለው ገሃነም ሳይቋረጥ ሊቀጥል ይችላል። ሊዛመትና ኢትዮጵያንም የከሸፈች/ ያልተሳካች ሀገር ሊያደርጋት ይችላል።

🔥 ኢትዮጵያ የተወሳሰበች ሀገር ናት ፣ ግን እኔ ለማንኛውም ለኢትዮጵያተመልካቾች ወይም በአጠቃላይ ለተመልካቾች ምክር አለኝ። ምክሩ የእኔ አይደለም ፣ ግን በባግዳድ ኢራቅ የተወለደው እና ያደገው ታላቁ የእንግሊዛዊ የታሪክ ምሁር ኤሊ ኬዱሪ፤ “አይናችሁን በሬሳዎች ላይ አድርጉ!” ሲል ለዴቪድ ፕራይስጆንስ የሰጠው ምክር ነው።

🔥 Today, Ethiopia is again in the news, for war in Tigray, a region in the country’s north. What is happening there is worse than war, if such a thing is possible: Tigray is a Theater For War Crimes & Crimes Against Humanity.

🔥 Rape has long been a weapon of war — in Sudan, the Balkans, Burma, and any number of other places. Rape in Tigray is on a mass, horrific scale. On January 21, a U.N. official, Pramila Patten, issued a statement. She is the U.N. “special representative” on the subject of “sexual violence in conflict.” I will quote just the first two sentences of her statement:

🔥 „I am greatly concerned by serious allegations of sexual violence in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, including a high number of alleged rapes in the capital, Mekelle. There are also disturbing reports of individuals allegedly forced to rape members of their own family, under threats of imminent violence.”

🔥 Who is responsible for the hell in Tigray? The prime minister, the Nobel peace laureate? The assignment of blame would take many pages of analysis. Suffice it to say, Abiy Ahmed is to blame for a lot, including the cut-off of communication between Tigray and the outside world, and the delay of humanitarian aid — desperately needed — to the region. Many are calling for the revocation of Abiy’s Nobel Peace Prize.

🔥 Today, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has egg on its face. Aung San Suu Kyi aside, the committee’s 2019 laureate is presiding over this murderous, monstrous mayhem in Tigray. But the 2019 award made sense, on Nobel terms. Classically, a committee asks itself, “Who has done the most or best work for fraternity between nations during the preceding year?”

🔥 The hell in Tigray may go on and on. It may spread, making Ethiopia a failed state.

🔥 Ethiopia is complicated, but I have advice for any Ethiopia-watchers, or watchers in general. It is not my advice, but the advice that Elie Kedourie, the great British historian, born and raised in Baghdad, gave to David Pryce-Jones: “Keep your eye on the corpses.”

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Posted in Ethiopia, Infos, Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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