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Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

The Internet And Spiritual Experience

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on September 14, 2017

The rabid development of information technology over the past two decades has truly brought about unexpected results, of which we could not even dream in the seventies and even eighties. The Internet, e-mail, web-based resources, social networks: they are part of our everyday life, work, science, education, art, and entertainment. The Internet has allowed us to reduce or even abolish distance. Thus, news can be transmitted through the Internet from one end of the earth to another in a couple of seconds – we have all had this experience. Conversations, sometimes even involving eye contact, now take place smoothly, regardless of distance. The only condition is that the user have Internet access. Indeed, the use of the Internet is so simple that any child or elderly person can easily use it.

In this same manner, the Word of God can be transmitted anywhere in the world. In this way, that which is happening here in Athens before an audience of 100 people can be recorded and sent to thousands or even millions of users, or even transmitted online.

But we should realize that the Word of God is not simple human speech, but bears Divine Energy, which can spiritually revive man and truly comfort him – and this can happen through the Internet. We know of many cases when various people – atheists, idolaters from India, Japan, and Nepal – have found Orthodoxy through the Internet and been reborn, because they found the truth that they were looking for in this life; they found Christ.

Not long ago the Hollywood actor Jonathan Jackson visited our monastery. I asked him how he became Orthodox. He told me that the Internet had very much helped him. On the other hand, thanks to the Internet, Christians who had departed from God have returned to Him, found themselves, and found their place in this world. There are people who had been on the verge of absolute frustration and, having listened to some talks on the Internet, found the necessary spiritual strength and hope, and are now developing spiritually.

Of course, the Orthodox Word of God is less present on the Internet compared to other words. When I speak of other words, I mean science, economics, politics, and even such phenomena as fashion, show business, or even certain corrupting resources that, unfortunately, are often visited.

It seems to me that today the Word of God must have a strong and powerful presence online. The majority of people today are disoriented, constantly falling at an impasse. In this era, only the Word of God can comfort man, inform him, and assure him of the possibility of eternal life. The Word of God transmitted through the Internet can have a healing function for man.

The creation of digital libraries with relevant content can and should be encouraged and multiplied. The heritage and wisdom of the Holy Fathers, with their remarkable texts, should be used as much as possible in the most modern and optimal way. The digitization and categorization of the Holy Fathers enables Internet users to find texts and information on topics of interest to them. Moreover, the digitization and promotion through webpages of the Word of God, especially the teachings of the Holy Fathers as well as of the Elders of the twentieth century, will bring spiritual benefit to our contemporaries.

Elder Ephraim of Katounakia said: “Oh, what it pity that it wasn’t possible to record the sayings of the Elder Joseph.” We understand that it is truly important when things are uttered by people who have experienced and gained personal experience in the unseen spiritual warfare. St. Paisios said: “Write down everything that is spiritual that you hear, as well as the experience that you have heard from others, because there will come a time when this experience will be exhausted, and you will have a spiritual deficiency.” Indeed, over the past few years there has been great growth in the publication of books of theological content, especially in Greece, but also in other Orthodox countries.

But, unfortunately, there are Orthodox who, due to language barriers, do not have access to these valuable texts. Moreover, the ordinary book, printed on paper, is now in a serious crisis. At the same time, sales of electronic books are growing. Therefore, we can say that we can make use of this trend. We can say that all this is good and God-pleasing, when everything goes correctly.

The Internet is a modern tool that promotes globalization. Those who would like to spread their ideas for global history, global economics, a global state, and a global leader know how to make use of the Internet – and, indeed, they use it at a high level. Why should not we, the Orthodox, use this instrument for promoting the global role of Orthodoxy? Why should we not use it for uniting the Orthodox and its mission in the known world?

The proper use of the Internet depends upon the user. Of course, the Internet cannot replace living contact. Of course, no one can attain a given level of spirituality through the Internet alone. Orthodoxy is person-centered. Priority also goes to the essential value of the person, to the individual person. The Internet is a tool, an instrument, that helps and benefits us – but in order for the faithful to lead an authentic spiritual life, it is required that he have personal contact with his spiritual father.

In the same way, it is essential to have communication with other brethren, in order to experience love and to participate in all the Mysteries of the Church. Of course, there are also cases in which excessive use of the Internet, even for good and spiritual purposes, can create dependence, resulting in asocial isolation and a detrimental effect on one’s personhood. Thus, the Internet can have negative results: instead of leading the user closer to Christ is can, on the contrary, lead him away from God. Therefore we bear the great responsibility of promoting and sharing the Word of God using the most creative, useful, and modern methods – but we should also inform our flock about how to use the Internet profitably, emphasizing all the negative effects that can be caused by the misuse of this technology.

Source

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Firelion? — Former Mozilla CEO Is Back With New Browser

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on September 29, 2016

ethiolionThe former CEO of Mozilla has released a new Internet browser called Brave.

Brendan Eich, the creator of JavaScript, continues to lead the technological revolution with Brave, an innovative concept in Internet browsers.

After blowing away the competition (read: Microsoft’s Internet Explorer) with the Internet browser Firefox, Eich has come up with Brave, a nearly ad-free, lightning-fast browser that eliminates intrusive ads as well as common but unwanted tracking tack-ons.

A tech legend for his Java and Firefox contributions, Eich was betrayed by his contemporaries and forced out of business as CEO of Mozilla, the company behind Firefox, because he supported natural marriage.

When it was revealed in 2014 that Eich donated $1,000 to California’s Proposition 8 ballot proposal, which defined marriage as the union of one man and one woman, he was blackballed, even though Proposition 8 was supported by the majority of Californians and easily passed in 2008.

Eich was publicly shamed because he believed in natural marriage and family. He was openly called a racist, Nazi, and inhumane.

But the tenacious techie didn’t give up. Without apology, Eich continued to innovate and ultimately came up with a whole new concept in web browsers: the ad-free, tracking-free, fast internet browser Brave.

In November 2015, Eich raised $2.5 million to create an advanced super-technical team. By August 2016, the company had raised $4.5 million in seed money to launch the browser.

Brave is called an entirely new way to browse the web without being intrusively tracked, and without time-consuming download ads.

Internet users have increasingly been using ad blockers like AdBlock Plus to cut down on the ads that slow Internet browsers down. But even with ad blocker software, users still see a lot of ads because the blockers have special arrangements with major advertisers to let their ads through.

Source

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United Nations in Ethiopia Website Defaced by Turkish Hackers

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 11, 2013

HackerFirwallTurkish hackers of the group known as Ayyıldız Tim have breached several websites from all around the world. The most important of them is a site of the United Nations in Ethiopia (et.one.un.org).

More precisely, the et.one.un.org website is used for the “Delivering as One” reform. On the defaced website, the hackers threaten that they will start a virtual war against anyone that’s against their country and religion.

At the time of writing, the United Nations website is still defaced. A mirror of the defacement is available on zone-h.org.

According to HackRead, in addition to the UN website, the Turkish hackers have also targeted various websites from Italy, Brazil, Thailand, Vietnam, and a couple of government websites from Honduras.

Many of these websites are still defaced, while some of them have been taken offline.

Source

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‘Cyber War’ or World Wide War’

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 3, 2011


In “Cyber War,” author Richard Clarke explores the newest front of modern war: the Internet and how America could already be on the losing side.

Cyber War is a powerful book about technology, government, and military strategy; about criminals, spies, soldiers, and hackers. This is the first book about the war of the future — cyber war — and a convincing argument that we may already be in peril of losing it.

Cyber War goes behind the “geek talk” of hackers and computer scientists to explain clearly and convincingly what cyber war is, how cyber weapons work, and how vulnerable we are as a nation and as individuals to the vast and looming web of cyber criminals. From the first cyber crisis meeting in the White House a decade ago to the boardrooms of Silicon Valley and the electrical tunnels under Manhattan, Clarke and coauthor Robert K. Knake trace the rise of the cyber age and profile the unlikely characters and places at the epicenter of the battlefield. They recount the foreign cyber spies who hacked into the office of the Secretary of Defense, the control systems for U.S. electric power grids, and the plans to protect America’s latest fighter aircraft.

 

Read an excerpt of the book

 

 


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‘The Net Delusion’

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 3, 2011

The net isn’t always what we think, thinks the author, Evgeny Morozov, in his book, “The Net Delusion”. Mr. Morozov argues, the west’s reckless promotion of technological tools as pro-democratic agents has provoked authoritarian regimes to crack down on online activity in some style: not just closing down or blocking websites, but using social networks to infiltrate protest groups and track down protesters, seeding their own propaganda online, and generally out-resourcing and out-smarting their beleaguered citizenry.

The following review of the book – in Egyptian context – is taken from the New York Observer

It’s not often that a nonfiction book appears whose thesis is immediately tested by events. But such is the fate of Evgeny Morozov’s “Net Delusion”

Morozov’s argument that the internet does more harm than good in political contexts is running up against violent reality in Egypt.

Morozov takes the ideas of what he calls “cyber-utopians” and shows how reality perverts them in one political situation after another. In Iran, the regime used the internet to crush the internet-driven protests in June 2009. In Russia, neofascists use the internet to organize pogroms. And on and on. Morozov has written hundreds of pages to make the point that technology is amoral and cuts many different ways. Just as radio can bolster democracy or — as in Rwanda — incite genocide, so the internet can help foment a revolution but can also help crush it. This seems obvious, yet it has often been entirely lost as grand claims are made for the internet’s positive, liberating qualities.

And suddenly here are Tunisia and, even more dramatically, Egypt, simultaneously proving and refuting Morozov’s argument. In both cases, social networking allowed truths that had been whispered to be widely broadcast and commented upon. In Tunisia and Egypt — and now across the Arab world — Facebook and Twitter have made people feel less alone in their rage at the governments that stifle their lives. There is nothing more politically emboldening than to feel, all at once, that what you have experienced as personal bitterness is actually an objective condition, a universal affliction in your society that therefore can be universally opposed.

Yet at the same time, the Egyptian government shut off the internet, which is an effective way of using the internet. And according to one Egyptian blogger, misinformation is being spread through Facebook — as it was in Iran — just as real information was shared by anti-government protesters. This is the “dark side of internet freedom” that Morozov is warning against. It is the freedom to wantonly crush the forces of freedom.

All this should not surprise anyone. It seems that, just as with every other type of technology of communication, the internet is not a solution to human conflict but an amplifier for all aspects of a conflict. As you read about pro-government agitators charging into crowds of protesters on horseback and camel, you realize that nothing has changed in our new internet age. The human situation is the same as it always was, except that it is the same in a newer and more intense way. Decades from now, we will no doubt be celebrating a spanking new technology that promises to liberate us from the internet. And the argument joined by Morozov will occur once again.


 


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Internet Killed Newspaper

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 30, 2008

Whenever I hear one of my favorite all-time pop song — “Video Killed The Radio Star!” — I keep wondering whether video indeed killed Radio at that particular time. One thing is true though, that is, Radio will be there despite the recent setbacks.  Arguably, it’s the most practical, comfortable and brilliant means of communication. As long as humans have two ears to listen with, we will continue needing Radio as it teaches us how to improve listening qualities on the social  and interpersonal communication level.

Although, right now, Radio and TV stations already have very slim news staffs, and rely on newspaper stories as the starting point for many of their own stories, the only surviving medium amongst the classic trio of Newspaper, Radio and Television, will be Radio. Radio was always there serving listeners gratis/free. Whereas the days of the rather costly printed media are counted. The TV age will also probably end within the next 10 or so years.

As the Internet has profoundly changed journalism, and print media is being rapidly reborn online, many journalists would embrace the change and prefer to doing blogs, and appreciating reader feedback on their stories. Of course, it is very exciting to see newsrooms as experiment rooms.

On the other hand, from now on, every passing day will bring us sad news about the death of some great newspapers and magazines, radio and TV stations.

Today, Wednesday, 29 October 2009, a potentially significant – and enormously sad – bit of newspaper history has just been announced in the United States. The Christian Science Monitor is to cease publishing as a daily paper in April of next year.

The Christian Science Monitor was, as it still is, one of the most respected and influential of American newspapers. It is also one of a tiny handful, alongside the likes of the New York Times and the Washington Post, which has always devoted the enormous resources required to cover not only events in the United States but across the wider world.

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