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Posts Tagged ‘Great Britain’

YOU Won’t BELIEVE What’s Happening in “Free and Democratic” Britain

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on August 4, 2018

This is what happens when Britain doesn’t stop from intervening in internal affairs of Ethiopian sociopolitical, cultural and religious communities. This is what’s occurring when they bring two Pakistani Muslims to key political power; Sadiq as Mayor of London, and Sajid as Home Secretory.

Watch the Sajid and Sadiq show:


Tommy Robinson Was Abused And Tortured With The Complicity Of The British State


Unless Robinson is lying – which I doubt – this is the only logical conclusion to be drawn from the accounts he gave to Rebel Media’s Ezra Levant and Fox News’s Tucker Carlson.

How else do you explain the perverse decision to move this outspoken critic of Islam into the Category C prison with the highest proportion of Muslim inmates in Britain?

Why was he put in a ground floor cell, opposite the prison mosque, which enabled the inmates to spit and throw excrement through his window – to the point where his only option was to keep it shut and suffer in the stifling heat?

And why was his food allowed to be prepared and served by Muslim prisoners when the authorities would undoubtedly have known that it would be deliberately contaminated with excrement and heaven knows what else?

No one is suggesting that Tommy Robinson should have been given special treatment by the prison authorities. Just the same rights as any other prisoner serving a short sentence for a non-violent crime.

The right, for example, not to have to spend your sentence in solitary confinement so as to protect you from all the prisoners on a mission to kill you.

The right not to be half-starved – as Robinson was because the only safe food he was able to eat on his limited personal allowance (which the prison refused to increase) was one tin of tuna and a piece of fresh fruit a day.

Whatever happened to the duty of care the state owes to prisoners in its custody?

If this kind of abuse were handed out to any other kind of prisoner – be he a child-murderer or a terrorist – can you imagine the fuss that would be made by all the civil rights groups, all the activist lawyers, all the left-leaning newspapers, the BBC?

A society is only as good as the treatment it gives to its lowliest citizens,” they’d argue – or some such virtue-signalling piety.

But apparently when you’re a white working-class bloke who rocks the multicultural boat and embarrasses the Establishment’s bury-your-head-in-the-sand appeasement policy, you lose all right to fair treatment and a fair hearing.

Source

Selected Comments:


SHAMEFUL GREAT BRITAIN YOU HAVE DAMAGED THE COUNTRY , MAYBE FOREVER.

Hard to believe it’s GB. What ever happened to that beautiful country with it’s green rolling hills? Globalism, greed, and scumbag politicians.

The Home Secretary, who is in charge of the entire prison system, is a Muslim. That explains Tommy’s transfer. And these people are appointed by Labour in all strategic places, they are everywhere, they run our country. But their allegiance is not with our country, it is with their political ideology called Islamism. Like putting a shark in charge of a swimming pool!

The UK government run by satanic pedophiles, Starting with the Royal” family

And the Left EVERYWHERE is the same. Closet totalitarians until they gain full power, then they “transform” into murdering totalitarians.

Scumbag human rights lawyers. They are quite happy to see those they don’t like being tortured. They will bend over backwards for islamists and child killers but when it’s a political prisoner on the right they actually support the mistreatment. Absolute hypocrites.

I hope the Government realise what they have done here, this is not justice or the sort of thing we expect in a free democratic society, it is tyranny and there is no exuse for this, Theresa May is guilty of tyranny. What is his crime, telling the truth, that is now a crime in the UK, this will not end well and if there is no justice anymore then we will have anarchy.

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Ethiopia Demands Britain Return All Country’s Artefacts Held By Victoria And Albert Museum

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 25, 2018

Request comes as treasures plundered by British forces in 1868 are put on display

A crown, probably made in Gondar, Ethiopia, around 1740 Victoria and Albert museum

Ethiopia has demanded Britain permanently return all artefacts that originated in the African country but are now held by the Victoria and Albert Museum.

An Ethiopian official said the government would not accept them on loan.

The declaration comes after the museum – one of London’s most popular tourist attractions – put treasures plundered by British forces from the east African nation in 1868 on display.

Well, it would be exciting if the items held at the V&A could be part of a long-term loan with a cultural institution in Ethiopia,” museum director Tristram Hunt said.

These items have never been on a long-term loan in Ethiopia, but as we look to the future I think what we’re interested in are partnerships around conservation, interpretation, heritage management, and these need to be supported by government assistance so that institutions like the V&A can support sister institutions in Ethiopia.”

Among the items on display are sacred manuscripts and gold taken from the Battle of Maqdala 150 years ago, when British troops ransacked the fortress of Emperor Tewodros II.

The offer of a loan did not go far enough for Ethiopia.

What we have asked (for) was the restitution of our heritage, our Maqdala heritage, looted from Maqdala 150 years ago. We presented our request in 2007 and we are waiting for it,” government minister Hirut Woldemariam said.

Ephrem Amare, Ethiopian National Museum director, added: “It is clearly known where these treasures came from and whom they belong to. Our main demand has never been to borrow them. Ethiopia’s demand has always been the restoration of those illegally looted treasures. Not to borrow them.”

The V&A said on Tuesday the idea of a long-term loan had come up as it discussed its Maqdala exhibition with Ethiopian authorities. “The V&A is committed to continuing this important and wide-ranging dialogue with colleagues at the Ethiopian Embassy in London,” it added in a statement.

In launching the Maqdala 1868 exhibition of what Mr Hunt called “stunning pieces with a complex history” this month, he said the display had been organised in consultation with the Ethiopian community in London.

As custodians of these Ethiopian treasures, we have a responsibility to celebrate the beauty of their craftsmanship, shine a light on their cultural and religious significance and reflect on their living meaning, while being open about how they came to Britain,” he said in a blog on the museum website.

Source

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Is Britain Becoming a Christianophobic Country

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 9, 2017

Kicked ‘like a football’ were the words used by a Pakistani Christian to describe a brutal assault that left him unconscious outside a restaurant in Derby last month. The victim, Tajamal Amar, claims Muslim men singled him out for offence he’d caused by displaying a cross and two large red poppies on his car, and for being a Kaffir – a derogatory term for non-Muslims. As it happens, the attack occurred towards the end of National Hate Crime Awareness Week, and has been recorded as a hate crime. The British Pakistani Christian Association, a group who’ve been supporting Amar, inform me his wife and daughter have been moved to a new location; he remains in hospital. But is his case symptomatic of a broader anti-Christian sentiment brewing in Britain?

Persecution of Christians in Pakistan (from where Amar was forced to flee), the Middle East, China, Nigeria and Modi’s India is well documented. Isis has committed genocide in Iraq and Syria, edging Christianity towards extinction. The bloodletting of Egypt’s Copts continues. In Pakistan, blasphemy laws are enforced, as in the cause célèbre of Asia Bibi, who remains languishing on death row. But when the BBC asks whether it’s ‘inadvisable’ to display poppies or hang a crucifix from your rear view mirror – here in Britain – it makes it harder to ignore the echoes of intolerance reverberating in our midst. While liberals and interfaith interlocutors struggle to have honest conversations about doctrinally motived hate, the truth is people like Amar aren’t alone.

Last November, Nissar Hussain a Christian convert (from Islam) was forced to leave his Bradford home under armed police escort following years of persecution. His terrible ordeal culminated in 2015, with a sickening assault outside his family home (captured on CCTV) by two hooded thugs, one brandishing a pickaxe handle. Hussain suffered a shattered kneecap and broken hand. A softly spoken and intelligent man – Hussain tells me he suffers from chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and feels betrayed by both politicians and Anglican leaders. Apostates like Hussain are of course particularly vulnerable, because Islamists believe it’s their God given duty to kill them. But contempt for Christianity comes from many quarters, not just Islamists.

In fact, the government’s hate crime action plan from last year, Action Against Hate, points to the chilling case of a Christian teenager who faced physical abuse and a mock crucifixion by his coworkers. When Belfast bakers Ashers refused to make a cake with the slogan ‘support gay marriage’, they were subjected to arson and death threats by gay rights extremists. Is this not Christianophobia?

Following the jihadist murder of Father Jacques Hamal in France last year, the Home Office released a £2.4 million fund to enhance security for places of worship. Of the applicants there were 225 churches, 36 mosques, 11 gudwaras and three other places of worship (funding for synagogues is separate). Remarkably, many churches that bid successfully used funds to protect themselves from Satanists and witches. A middle-aged vicar I spoke with from South West England told me how a witch had cursed him in the expectation he’d ‘drop dead’. The drawing of pentagrams on the church’s walls was a regular occurrence. If he’d chosen to tell the police, I suppose a curse could be classified as hate crime.

But how big is the problem? I’ve had access to a fascinating response to freedom of information requests to 25 UK police forces (from 2014) by think tank Parliament Street. This unearthed 165 or so incidents affecting Britain’s clergy between 2008-13. Incidents range from robbery, assaults like grievous bodily harm (GBH), actual bodily harm (ABH), through to obsessive stalkers, and bites from dogs, and even humans. A record relating to an incident in Hertfordshire shockingly reads: ‘Offender approached the Injured Party and bit fingers.’ Serving the Son of God has its risks. However, complaints of Christianophobia are thin on the ground, despite media and politicians showing an indifference to Christian suffering.

Home Office statistics from last year on religious hate crimes in England, Wales and Northern Ireland indicate there were 316 incidents (out of a total of 4213) affecting Christians between March 2015 and March 2016. Organisations like National Churchwatch who describe themselves as a ‘leading organisation for security and advice in the Christian sector’, believe anti-Christian hate crime is significantly under-reported. Director Nick Tolson previously sat on a Home Office panel awarding security grants to places of worship. He said that, unlike anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, anti-Christian hate is predominantly a phenomenon seen in rural Britain, rather than in urban areas. Tolson, a former police officer told me, ‘National Churchwatch is working with True Vision to run four seminars around the country to tackle anti-Christian hate crime. The seminars will involve talking with clergy about how to keep safe and how to deal with crime should it occur.’

His organisation is collaborating with academics from Royal Holloway, University of London in developing a survey aimed at clergy from the Church of England, Church of Wales and the Roman Catholic Church. A snapshot into the sorts of crimes clergy experience, and if the context is anti-Christian, will no doubt help inform policy makers moving forwards.

Meanwhile, the investigation into Amar’s case continues and two men have been interviewed in connection with the assault on suspicion of causing GBH. It’s sobering to think that someone who fled religious persecution overseas now feels unsafe in Britain.

Source

— ‘Write Letter To Family About Converting To Islam‘: Furious stepfather refuses to let his stepdaughter, 12, complete her homework after she is asked to pen them a note about becoming a Muslim

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One of The Jihadists Who Inspired – Among Others – The Mass Murder of Ethiopian Christians Lives in West London on £50,000 Benefits

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 6, 2015

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 A Muslim cleric with links to the Islamic terror group behind the Tunisian beach terrorist attack is living on benefits in a £1 million home in a leafy London suburb. Hate preacher Hani al-Sibai shares the large home with his wife and five children. Between them, they are raking in £50,000 a year from the taxpayer purse.

Al-Sibai is known to be a key figure in international jihad. For the last decade he has been running a propaganda operation from his London home that has influenced young Muslims across the world, including members of Ansar al-Sharia Tunisia (AST), the terrorist group behind last month’s Tunisian massacre.

Yet, despite his known connections to the group, he is free to live and claim benefits in the UK. Days after the Tunisian attack, the Daily Mail report that he was “strolling in the sunshine outside his home”. When asked how he could justify milking the welfare state for such a large amount of money, al-Sibai replied: “Ask David Cameron, don’t ask me.”

Al-Sibai and his wife are estimated to be living on £48,000 a year at the taxpayers’ expense. It is thought that they are able to claim nearly double the supposed £25,000 cap because they both claim disability living allowance. Al-Sibai has also been handed a car worth £16,000, and a parking space right outside his house to go with i

His flagrant abuse of the system has prompted calls for deportation. Tory MP Peter Bone said: “This is the sort of thing that drives my constituents mad. I expect the Home Secretary to deal with this urgently. There is a very strong case for him to be deported. He needs to be dealt with.”

Did you know that 80% of Muslims in Europe live off welfare benefits?

JUST UNBELIEVABLE

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Libyan Troops Go Wild in England

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 8, 2014

What a stupid Country and people we have become. How can you expect people to follow our law and customs when we turn every corner of our own Country into something resembing the middle East. If we worried about our own people as much as we do the rest of the World we would be so much better off. Sending them home? Bet the Human Rights Lawyers are queuing up outside to help them stay here.

They were supposed to be the ‘new’ Libyan army. Instead they allegedly went crazy in the streets of Cambridge, assaulting strangers and brutally raping one young man.

LONDON, England — The mantra that we need to train the forces of friendly governments and, for that matter, rebel groups, may have become a staple of every 21st century Western intervention in the Middle East, but sometimes things just go wrong. Really wrong.

A new generation of the Libyan army was supposed to be trained in the West as part of international efforts to rebuild the country after the ouster of Muammar Gaddafi. Hand-picked recruits were invited to rural England for basic infantry and junior command training.

On Tuesday, however, the British Ministry of Defense announced that all 300 trainees would be sent home early after a string of sexual assaults were perpetrated against the residents of Cambridgeshire, culminating in the alleged gang rape of a young man.

Britain had pledged to train 2,000 Libyan recruits in total, but that commitment is now under review.

Libyan Army cadets stationed at Bassingbourn barracks are alleged to have left the military camp on raids into the nearby university town of Cambridge, where a spate of sexual attacks were reported on the cobbled streets around the ancient college buildings.

Two of the recruits have admitted to two sexual assaults and a bicycle theft in Market Square right at the center of the old town. They also pleaded guilty to threatening a police office. Another cadet, aged 18, has been charged with three sexual assaults.

Continue reading…

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PM David Repenting Like King David?

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 23, 2014

 
david-confessingAt an Easter reception for Christian leaders at Downing Street, Mr Cameron said he finds his “moments of greatest peace” at Eucharist services at his children’s church.
 
He went further in an article below, in which he said Britain should be unashamedly “evangelical” about its Christian faith and give churches a greater role in society.
 
I believe we should be more confident about our status as a Christian country,” he said.
 
He said he had experienced the “healing power” of religion in his own life and insisted that Christianity could transform the “spiritual, physical, and moral” state of Britain and even the world.
 
“Christianity could transform the “spiritual, physical, and moral” state of Britain and even the world.”
 
Mr. Cameron seems to have done something right by upsetting these ‘public’ figures (AKA – homosexual militants, champagne socialist’s, Marxists, weirdo academics, Greens) they collectively accused the PM of sectarianism and division in a letter to The Telegraph last Monday.
 
These militant atheists should be grateful and thank God that they live in a Christian country. If the authors of the letter had tried writing it in Saudi Arabia, Iran or Pakistan, they would’ve quickly learned the benefits of living in a merciful, compassionate and tolerant Christian society.
 
Cynics might call Cameron, blatant hypocrite, after he officially endorsed the introduction of the so-called gay “marriage”, and expressed his willingness to promote it globally. How dare he call himself a Christian or even speak of the moral state of Britain when he passionate in saying, “I want London to stand alongside Dubai and Kuala Lumpur as one of the great capitals of Islamic finance anywhere in the world.” ?
 
Is the PM only making leap-service like Prince Charles? The Prince of Wales made last December the following statement, “I have for some time now been deeply troubled by the growing difficulties faced by Christian communities in various parts of the Middle East,” and, a month later continued prancing about in “Laurence of Arabia” garb as a charitable advocate for the Christian-persecutor Arabs when he performed a sword dance in Saudi Arabia.
 
After noticing his, mostly, anti-Christian actions in the past couple of years it is very difficult to understand why Prime Minister David Cameron is now saying what he is saying. His pushing for the re-definition of marriage has seemed to undermine the Christian cultural heritage of the UK, his administration and the militant “intellectual” atheist gangs are using the Islamic plague to exterminate the Jedeo-Christian identity of Britain, beyond repair. When we read the official report that in the Christian land of Britain, State schools isolate non-Muslims, we learn that it’s dangerous keeping this sort of people close, because it’s like keeping a crocodile as a pet and feeding it till it’s big enough to kill and devour you
 
I believe, a truly Christian society can forgive and give him the chance to correct his mistakes through acknowledgment and repentance. I don’t dare to compare PM David Cameron with our dearest Biblical King David. But it’s possible to draw some parallels in the lives of PM David Cameron and King David. I think, Mr. Cameron made many mistakes since he came to power four years ago. I also think that the elected PM is probably waking up because something tragic happened in his private life these past five years that might have forced him to go on a soul-searching mission like the anointed King David of Israel. There is something especially tragic about the death of a child. First, the PM lost his six-year-old son back in 2009, a year later, he mourned the sudden death of his father.
 
After becoming King of Israel, things were going very well for David, perhaps too well. He seemed to have the Midas touch — everything he touched turned to gold. God had given him success in all he undertook. Like Israel of old, David appears to momentarily forget that his success was the result of God’s grace, and not a tribute to his efforts alone.
 
David becomes more and more arrogant. This is most evident in 2 Samuel 11. Israel is at war with the Ammonites, and in the Spring (the time that kings go to war), David sends his army to besiege Rabbah, the capital city of the Ammonites, where the last of the Ammonite opposition has sought refuge. David does not go to battle with his soldiers, but stays at home in Jerusalem, indulging himself in the good life while his soldiers camp in an open field. David gets up from his bed about the time his soldiers (and others) usually go to bed. As he is strolling on the roof of his palace, David happens to see something that was not meant to be seen — a young woman cleansing herself, most likely a ceremonial cleansing ceremony done in keeping with the law. The woman is beautiful, and David decides that he wants her. He sends messengers to find out who she is. Their answer — that she was Bathsheba (House of Sheba), the Ethiopian, wife of Uriah the Hittite — should have ended the matter, but David had no intention of being deprived of anything he wanted. He sent for the woman and lay with her.
 
For David, it was all over after that one night of self-indulgence. He did not want another wife; he did not even appear to want an affair, just a night of pleasure. But God had other plans. Bathsheba conceived and eventually sent word to David that she was pregnant. When David’s efforts to deceive Uriah (and the people) into thinking Uriah had fathered this child, he had Uriah killed in battle with the help of Joab. After she had mourned for her husband, David brought Bathsheba into his home, taking her as his wife. Now at last, David hoped, it was over.
 
This thing which David had done displeased God, however, and God would give David no rest or peace until he had come to see his sin for what it was and repented of it. After some period of distress (Psalm 32:3-4), God sent Nathan to David with a story, a story which deeply upset David. David was furious. He insisted that the rich man who stole the poor man’s pet lamb deserved to die! Nathan then stopped David in his tracks with the words, “You are the man!” (2 Samuel 12:7). As David heard Nathan’s recital of his sin, he broke, declaring to Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord” (2 Samuel 12:13).
 
Nathan’s response to David’s confession was both comforting and disturbing. Although he deserved to die for his sins, David would not die because God had taken away his sin (12:13). What a relief these words must have been. But what followed would pierce David through: the son his sin had produced would die. It is David’s response to the death of this son that will be the focus of our lesson.
 
This is the first of a number of painful events David will experience as a result of his sin regarding Uriah and Bathsheba. In our text, David will suffer the loss of the child conceived through the sinful union of David and Uriah’s wife, Bathsheba. Next, David’s daughter will be raped by one of his sons. In retaliation for Amnon’s sin, Absalom murders him. Later, David’s son, Absalom, will rebel against his father and temporarily take over the throne. In the process, he will sleep with some of David’s concubines, before all Israel, and on the roof of the palace from which David first looked upon Bathsheba. All of these things are directly or indirectly the consequences of David’s sin with Bathsheba.
 
The tragic death of David’s son is a consequence of David’s sin, but it is not the penalty David deserves for his sin. The penalty for adultery and murder is death, on each count. David deserves to die, on two counts: adultery and murder. But Nathan has made it very clear that David’s sin has been “taken away.” The death of this child is a painful consequence of David’s sin, but it is not punishment for his sin, per se. That punishment has been taken away, borne by the Lord Jesus Christ.
 
My faith in the Church of England
 
British Premier, David Cameron expresses his pride in its openness, beauty, social action, and pastoral care
 
StGeorgEngland3LAST week I held my fourth annual Easter reception in Downing Street. Not for the first time, my comments about my faith and the importance of Christianity in our country were widely reported.
 
Some people feel that in this ever more secular age we shouldn’t talk about these things. I completely disagree. I believe we should be more confident about our status as a Christian country, more ambitious about expanding the role of faith-based organisations, and, frankly, more evangelical about a faith that compels us to get out there and make a difference to people’s lives.
 
First, being more confident about our status as a Christian country does not somehow involve doing down other faiths or passing judgement on those with no faith at all. Many people tell me it is easier to be Jewish or Muslim in Britain than in a secular country precisely because the tolerance that Christianity demands of our society provides greater space for other religious faiths, too.
 
Crucially, the Christian values of responsibility, hard work, charity, compassion, humility, and love are shared by people of every faith and none – and we should be confident in standing up to defend them.
 
People who, instead, advocate some sort of secular neutrality fail to grasp the consequences of that neutrality, or the role that faith can play in helping people to have a moral code. Of course, faith is neither necessary nor sufficient for morality.
 
Many atheists and agnostics live by a moral code – and there are Christians who don’t. But for people who do have a faith, that faith can be a guide or a helpful prod in the right direction – and, whether inspired by faith or not, that direction or moral code matters.
 
SECOND, as Christians we know how powerful faith can be in the toughest of times. I have known this in my own life. From giving great counsel to being the driving force behind some of the most inspiring social-action projects in our country, our faith-based organisations play a fundamental role in our society. So, in being confident about our Christianity, we should also be ambitious in supporting faith-based organisations to do even more.
 
That is why we are not just investing £20 million in repairing our great cathedrals, but also giving £8 million to the Near Neighbours programme, which brings faith communities together in supporting local projects. I welcome the efforts of all those who help to feed, clothe, and house the poorest in our society. For generations, much of this work has been done by Christians, and I am proud to support the continuation of this great philanthropic heritage in our society today.
 
THIRD, greater confidence in our Christianity can also inspire a stronger belief that we can get out there and actually change people’s lives, and improve both the spiritual, physical, and moral state of our country, and even the world.
 
I am a member of the Church of England, and, I suspect, a rather classic one: not that regular in attendance, and a bit vague on some of the more difficult parts of the faith.
 
But that doesn’t mean the Church of England doesn’t matter to me or people like me: it really does. I like its openness, I deeply respect its national role, and I appreciate its liturgy, and the architecture and cultural heritage of its churches. My parents spent countless hours helping to support and maintain the village church that I grew up next to, and my Oxfordshire constituency has churches – including some medieval masterpieces – that take your breath away with their beauty, simplicity, and serenity. They are a vital part of Britain’s living history.
 
I have felt at first hand the healing power of the Church’s pastoral care, and my children benefit from the work of a superb team in an excellent Church of England school.
 
Some fault the Church of England for perceived woolliness when it comes to belief. I am not one for doctrinal purity, and I don’t believe it is essential for evangelism about the Church’s role in our society or its importance. It is important – and, as I have said, I would like it to do more, not less, in terms of action to improve our society and the education of our children.
 
THE fact that, at a time of great economic difficulty, the UK has met the 0.7 per-cent target of Gross National Income on aid should be a source of national pride. Other countries have dropped that target, or failed to meet it. But every few seconds a child is being vaccinated against a disease because of the decision we have made in this country to keep our promises to the poorest people in the world.
 
The same is true of our Bill to outlaw the despicable practice of modern slavery. It is happening because we are actively working to bring all the legislation together, to toughen the penalties, and drive out this scourge that is still all too present in our world.
 
Some issues such as welfare are more controversial. I sometimes feel not enough is made of our efforts to tackle poverty. Of course, we have been through some tough economic times in turning our country around over the past few years. But it is through the dignity of work, the reforms to welfare that make work pay, and our efforts to deliver the best schools and skills for young people, that our long-term economic plan can best help people to a more secure future. And that is why today there are 1.6 million new private-sector jobs, unemployment is at its lowest level in half a decade, and there are more than 500,000 fewer people on out-of-work benefits.
 
So, I hope that, even when people disagree with specific policies, they can share in the belief of trying to lift people up rather than count people out. I welcome the debate with church leaders and faith communities about some of these issues, because in the end I think we all believe in many of the same principles. Whether it is the support people want to give their families, or the determination not to write anyone off, I believe these values and ideals are really important to all of us.
 
As politicians, I hope we can draw on these values to infuse politics with a greater sense of evangelism about some of the things we are trying to change. We see our churches as vital partners. If we pull together, we can change the world and make it a better place. That to me is what a lot of the Christian message is about – and it is a confidence in our Christianity that we can all reflect on this Easter.
 
Source
 
Would Human Life be Sacred in an Atheist World?
 
Christians-vs-AtheistsWhat was your reaction recently when it emerged that thousands of unborn foetuses had been burnt by NHS trusts? And that some had been put into ‘waste-to-energy’ incinerators and so used to heat hospitals?
 
Revulsion, I would imagine. But why? I would hazard that it is either because you are religious or because your customs and beliefs are still downstream from faith, even if you reject it. Because if you grant that an unborn foetus is not a life and that once aborted it could have no further use, there is at least an argument that these bodies might as well be put to use. Why not use unwanted babies to keep a hospital nice and warm?
 
It isn’t such a ridiculous argument. And it is time that atheists and non-believers began to take such stories — and their follow-on questions — as seriously as believers do. As Jonathan Sacks wrote in this magazine last year, when he was Chief Rabbi, atheists tend to imply that there isn’t much work to do after discarding God. On the contrary, after discarding God, all the work of establishing morals is still before you — just as after demonstrating mankind’s need for ethics, the work of proving a particular religion is true remains before you.
 
We continuously see the uniqueness of life being whittled away at all ends. With each year that goes by in increasingly post-Christian societies abortion becomes less and less of an issue. Too few atheists make arguments as passionate as those of believers over the aborting of unborn infants if they are of the ‘wrong’ sex, have some birth defect or a harelip. Even in America, which remains a significantly more religious country than ours, initially there was limited outrage at the trial last year of Kermit Gosnell, a Philadelphia physician discovered to have been carrying out ‘post-birth abortions’ — or child murder, as we might once have called it.
 
At the other extreme of life, we watch euthanasia become ‘assisted dying’ and the argument tilting in its favour. More and more it is about granting people a ‘humane’ end, rather than focusing on what such a move does to the significance of life as a whole. The treatment of bodies after death is another example. We have never cared less about what happens to our bodies after death. And this unconcern applies retrospectively. When digging up ancient burial yards, the fact that many of the bones being flung around come from people who went to their graves in the sure and certain hope of the Resurrection isn’t enough to dampen our appetite for eviction if a property development is at stake. Does an atheist lack of concern for the physical body show a great devil-may-care attitude — or demean the significance of the vessels we spend our lives in?
 
And so it goes, on and on. Most obvious at the extremities of life, the decline of the Christian concept of the self can be seen everywhere, not least the concept of human love as a quasi-divine thing.
 
The more atheists think on these things, the more we may have to accept that the concept of the sanctity of human life is a Judeo-Christian notion which might very easily not survive Judeo-Christian civilisation. Those who do not believe in God and who stare over that cliff — which as Theo Hobson points out, very few atheists actually do — may realise that only three options remain open to us.
 
The first option is to fall into the furnace. Another is to work furiously to nail down an atheist version of the sanctity of the individual. If that does not work, then there is only one other place to go. Which is back to faith, whether we like it or not.
 
Continue reading…
 
 
The Return of God: Atheism’s Crisis of Faith
 
This-is-Enemy-eWhen we talk about morals, we end up back talking about religion. That’s a good thing
 
Like any movement or religion, atheism has ambitions. Over the years it has grown and developed until it has become about far more than just not believing in God: today atheism aspires to a moral system too. It comes with an idea of how to behave that’s really very close to traditional secular humanism, and offers a sense of community and values.
 
But as pleasant and rational as this all sounds, the new atheists are now hitting the intellectual buffers. The problem that confronts them is as stark as it is simple: our morality has religious roots. Put another way: when God is rejected, the stakes are gulpingly high; the entire moral tradition of the West is put in question.
 
This was the insight of Friedrich Nietzsche — and for all the different atheist thinkers and philosophers since, it remains just as true today. It’s all very well to say that blind faith is a bad idea, and that we should move beyond it to a more enlightened ethical system, but this raises the question of what we mean by good and bad, and those ideas are irrevocably rooted in Christianity. Nietzsche saw this, and had the courage to seek a new ethos amid the collapse of all modern systems of meaning. Did he find one? Yes, in pagan power-worship — the sort that eventually led to fascism. We think of him as mad and bad — but he was brave. Imagine Ed Miliband trying to follow in this tradition, gazing into the abyss of all meaning, the dark crucible of nihilism.
 
The trouble is that too many atheists simply assume the truth of secular humanism, that it is the axiomatic ideology: just there, our natural condition, once religious error is removed. They think morality just comes naturally. It bubbles up, it’s instinctive, not taught as part of a cultural tradition. In The God Delusion Richard Dawkins tries to strengthen this claim using his biological expertise, arguing that humans have evolved to be altruistic because it ultimately helps their genes to survive. But in the end, he admits that no firm case can be made concerning the evolutionary basis of morality. He’s just gesturing with his expertise, rather than really applying it to the issue at hand.
 
The new atheism has reached the limits of what it can achieve because it is attempting to renew secular humanism in anti-religious terms. This cannot be done. It’s a paltry and dishonest attempt, because it avoids reflecting on the tradition of secular humanism. Such reflection is awkward for it, due to its muddled claim that morality is just natural, and so no special tradition is needed. And yet — felix culpa! The atheists have unwittingly raised the question, which we generally prefer to evade, of what secular humanism is, how it is related to God. By tackling this big issue ineptly, they have at least hauled it onto the table.
 
Continue reading…
 
 
China on Course to Become ‘World’s Most Christian Nation’ Within 15 Years

_3When I see Chinese and Ethiopian laborers respectfully work side by side in the streets of Addis Abeba, my immediate thought was, „no European dared in the past to clean our streets alongside „dirty Africans“ but, the Chinese seem civilized enough to swallow that empty, primitive pride the vast majority of European folks demonstrate – I don’t ask their motives but, I was positive that these folks could one day be somehow blessed or rewarded” This is what’s gonna happen: the ‘proud’, wicked and ungrateful Europeans, who seem to have decided to get rid of Christianity that keeps Europe from being a hell on earth, are now unconsciously throwing down the ladder by which they themselves have climbed. There are some signs now that The Holy Spirit is departing from the West to the East, in the direction of China, and there is no reward more expensive and precious than the Christian faith.
 
I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you“ [Genesis 12:3]
 
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America
 
It is said to be China’s biggest church and on Easter Sunday thousands of worshipers will flock to this Asian mega-temple to pledge their allegiance – not to the Communist Party, but to the Cross.
 
The 5,000-capacity Liushi church, which boasts more than twice as many seats as Westminster Abbey and a 206ft crucifix that can be seen for miles around, opened last year with one theologian declaring it a “miracle that such a small town was able to build such a grand church”.
 
The £8 million building is also one of the most visible symbols of Communist China’s breakneck conversion as it evolves into one of the largest Christian congregations on earth.
 
“It is a wonderful thing to be a follower of Jesus Christ. It gives us great confidence,” beamed Jin Hongxin, a 40-year-old visitor who was admiring the golden cross above Liushi’s altar in the lead up to Holy Week.
 
“If everyone in China believed in Jesus then we would have no more need for police stations. There would be no more bad people and therefore no more crime,” she added.
 
Continue reading…
 

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The Crimea: Luciferian Conspiracy Against Orthodox Christians

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on March 6, 2014

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it!!!

Crimean War

Perhaps we were on the wrong side way back when we and the French sided with the Turks. Perhaps Istanbul would be Constantinople and the Christians of the Middle East would not be dying in their thousands.

  • Anglican England and Roman Catholic France were aligned with Islam’s sultan-caliph against the Orthodox Christians of Russia
  • The Rothschild Family finances the British-French war effort against the Czar
  • The Crimean War claimed 800,000 lives
  • The results of the Crimean War foreshadow future world events. It is the first direct assault on Russia by the forces of The New World Order
  • March 1854: Britain and France formally join Turkey’s war against Russia
  • March 2014: Turkey grants US warship permission to enter Black Sea
  • The New World Order’s secret war against Christian Leaders and Monarchs worldwide
  • Genocide on Orthodox Christians
  • 1918: Mysterious “Spanish Flu” kills 50-70 million people worldwide
  • Tafari Makonnen (the future Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia) was one of the first Ethiopians who contracted influenza but survived – 5,000 to 10,000 Ethiopians died in Addis Abeba alone
  • A number of oddities suggest that the epidemic is in fact the world’s first bioweapon. Was it intended to be used against the Ethiopian nation which just experience triumph in The Battle of Adowaover the invading forces of Illuminati Italy, but somehow backfired and infected the entire world as well?

The Crimea, today described as the “flashpoint” of the Ukraine crisis, was a “flashpoint” in the 19th century that claimed 800,000 lives.

One should not forget. Ottoman Turks and Crimean Tatars were notorious raiders and slave traders. Their atrocious cruelty against the Christian nations of the Crimea & Eastern Europe should never been forgotten. It bewilders me that the Tatars are still allowed to live alongside the Slavic nations of Russia and the Ukraine after the repetitive crimes they’ve committed against them.

One should not forget. The “flashpoints” created by imperial ambitions which erupted so spectacularly during the First World War have not gone away. The beautiful, temperate Crimean peninsula is still strategic territory, giving Russia access to the Black Sea. This is the only way Russia can gain access to Europe by sea, excluding the Baltic, which can easily be blocked by northern powers.

It’s difficult to understand today’s crisis in Crimea without understanding her past, which is why we’ve got to teach history and we’ve got to learn it. Crimea is a holy land for Russians. When you place Crimea in her historic context, it is not at all surprising that she is loyal to Russia and Russia is loyal to her. As historian, Orlando Figes explains, it was in Kheronesos, the ancient Greek city on the south-western coast of Crimea, where Vladimir, Grand Prince of Kiev, was baptized in 988, bringing Christianity to Russia. Clearly this was a strategic decision in itself, because the Crimea sits on the fault line between Christianity and the Islam, the force which Russia set out to defeat.

Constantinople had fallen to the Turks in 1453 and it was the founding myth of the Tsarist state that Moscow was the last remaining capital of Orthodoxy, the “Third Rome.” According to this ideology, which imbued every Tsar until the last one was shot in 1917, it was Russia’s divine mission to liberate Orthodox Christians from the Islamic empire of the Ottomans and restore Constantinople as the seat of Eastern Christianity.

The Economist wrote back in 2010 that the fighting (1853-56) in the then Russian territory of the Crimea was also a “holy war” for each belligerent power. Leaders used religious rhetoric and ordinary soldiers and sailors said their prayers as they tried to make sense of what they were doing. A war in which two Christian countries fighting a third claimed Islam as their ally

That, presumably, is the point Orlando Figes, a historian at Birkbeck College in London, is making with his British subtitle, “The Last Crusade”. His book reveals the strange mixture of meanings the war had for its combatants. He puts the conflict into its broader context: the determination of Britain (and with some reservations, France) to stem Russian expansion and to bolster Islam in its fight with eastern Christianity.

No, that last point is not a mistake. The great historical paradox of the Crimean war—and of the longer-term Russo-Turkish conflict of which it was one episode—is that Anglican England and Roman Catholic France were aligned with Islam’s sultan-caliph against the tsars who saw themselves as the world’s last truly Christian emperors. Above all, the western Christian powers were determined to avoid any reversal of the Muslim conquest of Istanbul: “The Russians shall not have Constantinople” chorused an English music-hall song. (pretty much the same in 2014)

How did the various players in this strange religious game explain themselves to their own pious subjects? For the theocracies of Russia and Turkey, and their God-fearing soldiers, things were fairly straightforward: they were fighting, respectively, for Christianity and Islam.

It was harder, you might think, for the Church of England and the Catholic establishment in France to explain their support of the caliphate. In fact, they found it easy enough to construct the necessary arguments. First, British and French clerics demonized Russian Orthodoxy as a semi-pagan creed. Second, they maintained that in some peculiar way the Ottoman empire was more friendly to its Christian subjects than the tsar was. (The Ottomans tolerated Protestant missionaries, so long as the evangelisers limited their search for souls to Orthodox Christians.)

In the spring of 1854, as the Crimean fighting began in earnest, an Anglican cleric declared that Russian Orthodoxy was as “impure, demoralising, and intolerant as popery itself”. What could be more natural, then, than to team up with Islam and popery to cleanse that terrible impurity? A French newspaper, meanwhile, gave warning that the Russians represented a special menace to all Catholics because “they hope to convert us to their heresy”.

As Mr Figes recalls, the tactical friendship between Western Christians and Ottoman Muslims had its limits. To be sure, British envoys to the Holy Land probably found more in common with lordly Ottoman administrators than with the exuberant faith of Orthodox Christian peasant-pilgrims. But not all Muslim Turks were overjoyed at being embraced, and hailed as Christian-friendly, by Western powers. When in 1856 the sultan yielded to Western pressure and granted Christians some equality, there was a backlash from the Islamic establishment across the empire.

Additional readings:

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Christians In Britain Denied to Wear The Christian Cross

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on January 14, 2013

AntiChristChristians face judgement day in Strasbourg ‘right to wear the cross’ case

Judges at Strasbourg will rule on Tuesday whether four Christians were discriminated against at work, including two women who claim they were forced out of their jobs for wearing the cross.

The British government is fighting the cases, arguing that because crosses are not a “requirement” of the Christian faith, employers can forbid the wearing of such symbols and sack workers who insist on doing so.

Continue reading…

Christians’ rights: Martyred on a cross of secular liberalism

Since the Harry Hammond case just over a decade ago, the British courts have become a battleground for the clash of secular and Christian viewpoints.

The battle has been almost universally one way as the rights of Christians, in terms of the ability to practise their faith in the public sphere, have been eroded to the point where they have virtually no protection.

The cases that I have been instructed in are alarming- and it’s not just the “little people”: health workers or junior civil servants.

It’s also the top accountant being told he’s lost his job because a public authority disapproves of his church’s website.

And it’s not just people’s jobs that are at stake. Even the right to worship is under threat with Christians being prosecuted for singing hymns at church on a Sunday because they’re too noisy.

Continue reading…

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British Children ‘Must Be Taught Christianity’

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 26, 2012

My note: While the tabloid, ‘Daily Express’ titled this report accurately, the BBC is ratcheting up the propaganda that paints the Christians faith in the usual hateful manner by twisting the truth on the same poll with a very cynical headline, “Teaching of Christianity ‘lacks intellectual development‘” The Corporation is getting ever more disgraceful even after the recent embarrassing blunders and scandals  (must read) How low can this, once great broadcaster go?

 

SCHOOLCHILDREN need to be taught Christianity so they can understand British history and culture, a poll of parents has revealed.

Almost two-thirds believe Christianity is key to our history and over half think it is important to help children understand British culture.

Nearly half say more attention should be given to teaching Christianity in RE lessons – but a third say many teachers do not know enough about it themselves.

The Oxford University poll of nearly 2,000 adults found most wanted children to be taught the history of the religion, major festivals like Easter and Christmas and Christian morality.

 

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British Government: Christians Have No Right To Wear Cross At Work

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on March 11, 2012

In a highly significant move, ministers will fight a case at the European Court of Human Rights in which two British women will seek to establish their right to display the cross.

It is the first time that the Government has been forced to state whether it backs the right of Christians to wear the symbol at work.

A document seen by The Sunday Telegraph discloses that ministers will argue that because it is not a “requirement” of the Christian faith, employers can ban the wearing of the cross and sack workers who insist on doing so.

Continue reading…

 

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