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Posts Tagged ‘Frankincense’

Frankincense (እጣን) Oil Kills Cancer Cells While Boosting The Immune System

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 30, 2016

ከእጣን እና ጥቁር አዝሙድ የሚገኙትን ድንቅና ፈዋሽ ዘይቶች በአገራችን በቀላሉ ማግኘት እየተቻለ፡ እንደ ዘንባባ ዘይት የመሰሉትን መርዛማ የምግብ መስሪያ ዘይቶች ለምንድን ነው ወደ አገራችን የምናስገባው? በዘንባባ ዘይት (Palm Oil) ሕዝባችንን ሊፈጁት ነው፤ ይህን ዘይት እግዚአብሔር ከአገራችን ያጥፋልን!

frankincense-ethiopia-essential-oilFrankincense is a powerful medicinal oil that can not only boost the immune system but also kill cancer cells, a number of studies have shown.

One of the most significant recent studies was conducted by researchers from the University of Leicester, England, in 2013. The researchers found that the naturally occurring frankincense compound acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) targeted and destroyed ovarian cancer cells. The findings were particularly significant because they showed that AKBA had this effect even in late-stage ovarian cancer patients, not just in laboratory trials performed on isolated cells.

“Frankincense is taken by many people with no known side effects,” lead researcher Kamla Al-Salmani said. This finding has enormous potential to be taken to a clinical trial in the future and developed into an additional treatment for ovarian cancer.”

Kills cancer and reduces radiation side effects

The Leicester findings build on a large and still growing body of evidence that frankincense and its compounds have powerful immune-boosting and cancer-fighting benefits.

A study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2009, for example, found that the herbal form of frankincense triggered death in bladder cancer cells by activating several different cellular pathways. Another study, conducted by researchers from Nihon University in Tokyo and published in Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, showed that several chemical components of frankincense were able to kill three separate human neuroblastoma cell lines. The same study also found that frankincense inhibited the growth of Epstein-Barr virus.

Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that forms in nerve cells and primarily affects young children. Other studies have shown that frankincense and its components can kill cancers of the brain, breast, colon, pancreas, prostate and stomach.

Frankincense may also help mitigate the often-debilitating side effects of cancer treatment. One study, published in the journal Cancer in 2011, was performed on brain cancer patients experiencing cerebral edema (swelling) as a side effect of radiation therapy. The researchers found that 60 percent of participants given frankincense experienced a 75 percent reduction in cerebral swelling, a potent enough result for the authors to recommend frankincense as a potential alternative to steroids, the current favored treatment. Side effects of steroids can include headaches, blurred vision and migraines.

All-around immune booster

Frankincense’s cancer-fighting benefits seem to come, in part, from its potent effects on the immune system. One study, conducted by researchers from Baylor University Medical Center, found that acts upon the expression of genes that help regulate the immune system, leading to cancer cell death. Another study, published in Phytotherapy Research, found that mice given frankincense exhibited increases in several key markers of immune function, primarily levels of white blood cells (lymphocytes) and anti-inflammatory activity.

Numerous studies have confirmed frankincense as a powerful anti-inflammatory. This, along with its other immune-boosting properties, may in part explain its usefulness in fighting infection and in treating autoimmune conditions such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Frankincense can also be used to heal skin, including from acne and scarring, and can reduce anxiety levels.

If you wish to incorporate frankincense as a regular natural health booster, it can be taken as an undiluted essential oil on the skin or as a few drops under the tongue. It can also be diffused and breathed in for respiratory conditions. Frankincense can also be purchased and consumed in powdered capsule form.

There are numerous species of frankincense, including Boswellia carteri, B. serrata and B. sacra. All three of these species have shown powerful anti-cancer effects in scientific tests.

B. carteri, native to east Africa, has been the species most heavily studied. B. sacra, also known as “sacred frankincense,” was until recently restricted to use by the Saudi royal household, and could only be purchased in Oman. Recently, however, a distillery opened up in Oman to produce essential oil of B. sacra for public sale.

Source

The Mysterious Myrrh & Frankincense

What Do Frankincense, Christians and Bees Have In Common?

A Wise Man’s Cure: Frankincense is For Life, Not Just For Christmas

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Posted in Curiosity, Ethiopia, Health | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

A Wise Man’s Cure: Frankincense is For Life, Not Just For Christmas

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on January 4, 2015

At this time of year it is hard to escape the Three Wise Men, riding their camels across Christmas cards and appearing in miniature form in countless school nativity plays across the world, bearing their gifts for the infant Jesus. Whilst we are all familiar with gold, it is the mention of frankincense and myrrh that really says “Christmas” to us and and takes our imaginations back to ancient times. But you might be surprised to learn that these two fragrances are still big business today; for example, Ethiopia alone trades around 4000 tonnes of frankincense every year. This is all the more remarkable because a single tree from which the resin is harvested will typically yield about 200g per year. The main international trade comes from a tree called Boswellia papyrifera, and Ethiopia is the main exporting country.

Frankincense is harvested by wounding the bark of trees and collecting the resin that is subsequently released from the wound, a process known as tapping. Tapping is carried out at several spots along the stem, using a traditional type of tool that resembles a chisel. The procedure is repeated in 8 tapping rounds during the dry season, which lasts about 8 months. But high demand means that many trees are being over-exploited and populations are at risk of dying out, threatening the livelihoods of villagers who depend on them.

But help may be on hand as the results of a new study by botanists from Ethiopia and the Netherlands led by Motuma Tolera, which could secure a future for the trees by revealing the anatomy of the resin secretory system.

Motuma Tolera explains, “In some areas, the high demand for frankincense is causing over-tapping, which is bad for a couple of reasons. Tapping the tree creates wounds in the stem that take resources to be healed, and more wounds create more opportunities for insects to attack the tree. It’s not a surprise that some trees die. This is bad for the tree but also for the people living in those areas, since they depend on the resin production, both economically and culturally.

One of the problems is the lack of knowledge of the type, architecture and distribution of resin producing, storing and transporting structures in the tree. Such knowledge is needed for improved tapping techniques in the future.”

The study, published this month in the Annals of Botany, provides this detailed knowledge for the first time.

Motuma Tolera said, “What we found was a 3-D network of inter-connected canals in the inner bark. Most of these canals are within a very narrow region of the inner bark, in a zone that is less than 7 millimeters thick. These allow for the transport of resin around the tree. We also found a few canals connecting deep into the xylem, the heart of the tree.”

Boswellia6

The findings will have practical applications for the people of Ethiopia and other frankincense producers. Traditional tapping starts with a shallow wound, from which a relatively small amount of resin is released. The wound is then re-opened later with a cut that goes a bit deeper and more resin is collected – a process that is repeated over and over again. The amount of resin collected peaks after about 5 rounds of tapping, which the study suggests is the point at which the wound reaches the main region of resin canals.

Motuma Tolera says, “Our results suggest that tapping can become more efficient. A cut that goes deeper, earlier in the tapping cycle, may drain the resin more effectively. Since the 3-D resin canal network may allow for long distance movement of resin when it is intact, this would be an option to reduce the number of cuts, and reduce the damage to the trees. New studies will be needed to show how such improvements may keep trees healthy but still productive for resin production. This opens new ways for a more sustainable frankincense production system.”

It’s nice to discover something new, but here we also have the opportunity to give something back to the people who helped us with the study. I hope everyone in Lemlem Terara, but also elsewhere in Ethiopia, will benefit from what we have found in the future.” Tolera says.

The team hope the results mean more Boswellia trees will live to see next Christmas.

Source

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Posted in Curiosity, Ethiopia, Faith, Infos | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Mysterious Myrrh & Frankincense

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 30, 2009

FrankincenseOriginMyrrh and Frankincense have had spiritual significance since ancient times and they also were adopted as medicines for physical ailments. When referring to this pair of herbs, many people might immediately think of their historic importance in religion.

The herbs are best known through the story of the Three Wise Men (Magi) delivering gold, frankincense, and myrrh for the baby Jesus; myrrh was also used to anoint Jesus’ body after the crucifixion.

These herbs, valued like gold, were mentioned repeatedly in the Old Testament, in instructions to Moses about making incense and anointing oil, and in the Song of Solomon, where, among other references, are these:

Who is this coming up from the wilderness

Like palm-trees of smoke,

Perfumed with myrrh and frankincense,

From every powder of the merchant?”

Till the day doth break forth,

And the shadows have fled away,

I will get me unto the mountain of myrrh,

And unto the hill of frankincense.

Frankincense (Boswellia) and Myrrh (Commiphora) species are economically and ecologically important plant species found mainly in the horn of Africa particularly in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya. They are the source of aromatic gum resins, frankincense and myrrh.

Frankincense and myrrh have been valued for their sacred and ceremonial uses as well as in medicinal contexts since several millennia. Still today, they are widely used as raw materials in several industries such as pharmacology, food, beverage, flavoring, liqueurs, cosmetics, detergents, creams and perfumery, paints, adhesive and dye manufacturing.

Ethiopia is one of tropical African countries with large potentials of frankincense and myrrh resources and has been known as one of the major producers. Nevertheless, little efforts have been made at national level to explore the vegetation resources that provide these valuable products.

Both myrrh and frankincense grow as small trees or shrubs; they are of the botanical family Burseraceae. Their natural growing range is limited, but this has been extended by cultivation, and the current supplies are adequate to meet worldwide demand.

Today, most of the internationally-traded myrrh and frankincense are produced in the southern Arabian peninsula (Oman, Yemen) and in northeast Africa (Ethiopia, Somalia). The primary species relied upon today are Commiphora myrrha for myrrh and Boswellia caraterii for frankincense.

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Posted in Ethiopia | Tagged: , , , | 12 Comments »

 
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