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Posts Tagged ‘Cinnamon’

Cinnamon ( ቀረፋ ) May Aid Learning Ability

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on August 1, 2016

Spice consumption made mice better learners

CinnamonMouse

The 1st century Roman philosopher, Pliny the Elder, reasoned that cinnamon hails from Ethiopia. Cinnamon, he reasoned, was carried on rafts bereft of oars or sails and propelled by “man alone and his courage.

Cinnamon is a delicious addition to toast, coffee and breakfast rolls. Eating the tasty household spice also might improve learning ability, according to new study.

Cinnamon is a delicious addition to toast, coffee and breakfast rolls. Eating the tasty household spice also might improve learning ability, according to new study results published online in the July issue of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology.

The study by neurological scientists at Rush University Medical Center found that feeding cinnamon to laboratory mice determined to have poor learning ability made the mice better learners.

“This would be one of the safest and the easiest approaches to convert poor learners to good learners,” said Kalipada Pahan, PhD, the lead researcher of the study and the Floyd A. Davis Professor of Neurology at Rush.

Some people are born naturally good learners, some become good learners by effort, and some find it hard to learn new tasks even with effort. Little is known about the neurological processes that cause someone to be a poor learner and how to improve performance in poor learners.

“Understanding brain mechanisms that lead to poor learning is important to developing effective strategies to improve memory and learning ability,” Pahan said.

Cinnamon role reversal

The key to gaining that understanding lies in the hippocampus, a small part in the brain that generates, organizes and stores memory. Researchers have found that the hippocampus of poor learners has less CREB (a protein involved in memory and learning) and more alpha5 subunit of GABAA receptor or GABRA5 (a protein that generates tonic inhibitory conductance in the brain) than good learners.

The mice in the study received oral feedings of ground cinnamon, which their bodies metabolized into sodium benzoate, a chemical used as a drug treatment for brain damage. When the sodium benzoate entered the mice’s brains, it increased CREB, decreased GABRA5, and stimulated the plasticity (ability to change) of hippocampal neurons.

These changes in turn led to improved memory and learning among the mice.

“We have successfully used cinnamon to reverse biochemical, cellular and anatomical changes that occur in the brains of mice with poor learning,” Pahan said.

The researchers used a Barnes maze, a standard elevated circular maze consisting of 20 holes, to identify mice with good and bad learning abilities. After two days of training, the mice were examined for their ability to find the target hole. They tested the mice again after one month of cinnamon feeding.

The researchers found that after eating their cinnamon, the poor learning mice had improved memory and learning at a level found in good learning mice. However, they did not find any significant improvement among good learners by cinnamon.

“Individual difference in learning and educational performance is a global issue,” Pahan said. “We need to further test this approach in poor learners. If these results are replicated in poor learning students, it would be a remarkable advance.”

Cinnamon also may aid against Parkinson’s disease

Cinnamon has been a sweet spot for Pahan’s research. He and his colleagues previously that cinnamon can reverse changes in the brains of mice with Parkinson’s disease.

These studies have made the researchers spice connoisseurs: They used mass spectrometric analysis to identify the purer of the two major types of cinnamon widely available in the United States — Chinese cinnamon (Cinnamonum cassia) and original Ceylon cinnamon.

“Although both types of cinnamon are metabolized into sodium benzoate, we have seen that Ceylon cinnamon is much more pure than Chinese cinnamon, as the latter contains coumarin, a hepatotoxic (liver damaging) molecule,” Pahan said.

The study of cinnamon and learning ability was supported by grants from National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Alzheimer’s Association.

Source

Gernot Katzer’s Spice Pages

— Cinnamon – Health Benefits, and Other Interesting Facts

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Posted in Ethiopia | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Good-old Cinnamon (ቀረፋ) May Cut off Cancer’s Blood Supply

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 7, 2012

Cinnamon, one of the most ancient spices in human history, appears to have unique cancer-stunting properties, researchers reported in the Dec. 7 issue of the journal Carcinogenesis. Scientists in City of Hope’s Department of Molecular Medicine showed that extracts of the spice may be able to block the growth of blood vessels, called angiogenesis, in tumors.

“We found that a water-based extract from cinnamon was a potent angiogenesis inhibitor,” said Wei Wen, Ph.D., assistant professor of molecular medicine and senior author on the study. Cinnamon comes from the bark of a small evergreen tree.

Continue reading…

Cinnamomum Cinnamon benefits:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Digestion
  • Weight loss
  • Menopause
  • Warms the body
  • Yeast infections
  • Circulation
  • Uterine hemorrhaging
  • Fungal infections

The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea

The Cinnamon Adventure

Past Present
Opone Somalia
Malao Somalia
Aksum Empire Ethiopia/Eritrea
Himyarite kingdom Yemen
Frankincense kingdom Hadramaut/Yemen
Rhapta Tanzania/Mozambique
Barygaza India
Early Chera, Chola, etc India

 

 

Etymology:

Cyeneum = Cinnamon?

The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea or Periplus of the Red Sea (Greek: Περίπλους τὴς Ἐρυθράς Θαλάσσης, Latin: Periplus Maris Erythraei) is a Greco-Roman periplus, written in Greek, describing navigation and trading opportunities from Roman Egyptian ports like Berenice along the coast of the Red Sea, and others along Northeast Africa and the Indian subcontinent. The text has been ascribed to different dates between the 1st and 3rd centuries AD, but a mid-1st century date is now the most commonly accepted. Although the author is unknown, it is clearly a firsthand description by someone familiar with the area and is nearly unique in providing accurate insights into what the ancient world knew about the lands around the Indian Ocean.

Although Erythraean Sea (Greek: Ἐρυθρά Θάλασσα) literally means “Red Sea”, to the Greeks it included the Indian Ocean and the Persian Gulf.

Opposite Mountain Island, on the mainland twenty stadia from shore, lies Adulis, a fair-sized village, from which there is a three-days’ journey to Coloe, an inland town and the first market for ivory. From that place to the city of the people called Auxumites there is a five days’ journey more; to that place all the ivory is brought from the country beyond the Nile through the district called Cyeneum, and thence to Adulis.

Full text of “The Periplus of the Erythræan sea; travel and trade in the Indian Ocean

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