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Ethiopia's World / የኢትዮጵያ ዓለም

Posts Tagged ‘BBC’

What’s Happening in Ethiopia Matters for Africa – BBC

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 17, 2021

Ethiopia, Africa’s second most populous country, is about to hold its first election since Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed came to power in 2018. This, despite a bloody conflict and looming famine in the northern Tigray region as well as escalating ethnic tensions are key factors for Ethiopia’s future and its neighbours.

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The Tigraiphobe Guromo (Gurage + Oromo) Berhanu Nega’s Interview With BBC Radio

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on May 21, 2021

Mind you, this interview was recorded September 21, 2012, a few weeks after PM Meles Zenawi passed away. In Ethiopia there is a huge respect for anyone who has just died – even for one’s enemy. That was the case with Meles Zenawi.

I remember, and I witnessed it myself, when PM Meles Zenawi passed away,

Ethiopians were mourning and expressing their Grief. There were Condolences from World Leaders & Friends, but not from this pig, called Berhanu Nega! No condolence, nothing, nada! I was angry at Berhanu Nega when I heard that interview on that very day – as it was a Very unEthiopian behavior.

ልብ ይበሉ ፣ ይህ ቃለ ምልልስ የተቀረፀው ጠ / ሚኒስትር መለስ ዜናዊ ከሞቱ ከጥቂት ሳምንታት በኋላ እ... መስከረም 21 ቀን 2012 .ም ነበር፡፡ በአገራችን እምነት እና ባሕል ለሞተ ማንኛውም ሰው ፥ ለጠላትም ቢሆን እንኳን ትልቅ አክብሮት አለን። መለስ ዜናዊ ከአረፉ በኋላ በብዙ ኢትዮጵያውያን ዘንድ ታይቶ የነበረው ከፍተኛ የሃዘን ሁኔታ ልክ ቪዲዮው ላይ እንደሚታየው ነበር።

በወቅቱ በደንብ አስታውሳለሁ፤ እኔ ራሴ ምስክር ነበርኩ ጠ / ሚ መለስ ዜናዊ ከዚህ አለም በሞት ሲለዩ ብዙ ኢትዮጵያውያን ሀዘናቸውን እየገለጹ ነበር፡፡ ከአሳማው/ጉማሬው/ጉሮሞ ብርሃኑ ነጋ፣ ከጂኒው አብዮት አህመድ አሊ እና መንጋዎቻቸው በቀር ከዓለም መሪዎች እና ከጓደኞቻቸው ሁሉ የመጽናናት መልዕክቶች ሲጎርፉ ነበር! በዛን ቀን ያንን የብርሃኑ ነጋን ቃለ መጠይቅ በሰማሁ ጊዜ በብርሀኑ ነጋ መናደዴን “ምን ዓይነት ሰው/ኢትዮጵያዊ ቢሆን ነው?” በማለት ለቤተሰቦቼና ጓደኞቼ ማውሳቴን አስታውሳለሁ፡፡ በጣም ኢ-ኢትዮጵያዊ የሆነ ባህሪ ነበረና፡፡ ብርሃኑ ነጋን ላክልበት እና አረመኔዎቹ ኢሳያስ  አፈቆርኪ እና ግራኝ  አብዮት አህመድ አሊ ያቆጠቆጡ የሲ.አይ.ኤ ችግኞች ናቸው፤ ለመግደልና ለማስገደል ደማቸው ውስጥ ቺፕ ያስቀበሩ የማንቹሪያን እጩዎች ናቸው። ትግራዋይ ጠሎቹ ብርሃኑ ነጋ፣ አብዮት አህመድ አሊ እንዲሁም ሌሎች ብዙዎችም የትግራይን ህዝብ ለማጥናትና ለመሰለል በትግራይ የነበሩ፤ ብሎም የትግርኛ ቋንቋንም እንዲያጠኑ የተደረጉ የጊዜ ፈንጂ መሆናቸውን እናስምርበት።

ቪዲዮው ላይ ምልክት ያደርኩበት ለመሆኑ ገዳይ አብዮት አህመድ ይሆንን? ግራኝ አብዮት አህመድ + የግብጹ ሙርሲ + ሸህ መሀመድ አላሙዲን + ፕሬዚደንት ባራክ ሁሴን ኦባማ መለስ ዜናዊ ገድለው አብዮት አህመድን ለማንገስ መፈንቅለ መንግስት እንዳደረገ በወቅቱ እንዳደረጉ እዚህ ላይ አውስቼ ነበር፤ 👉 “ግራኝ ፪ኛው ለግብጽ እና ኦሮሚያ ሲል ኢትዮጵያን እያመሳት እንደሆነ ዛሬም አታውቁም?”

💭 From The BBC:

Meles death: Leaders’ reaction. Published 21 August 2012

African and other leaders have been reacting to the news that Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi has died at the age of 57. He was one of the continent’s most prominent leaders and had dominated Ethiopian politics for more than 20 years.

👉 Raila Odinga, Kenyan Prime Minister

Meles Zenawi was a great leader, an intellectual, someone who was very dedicated to pan-Africanism. One will remember him for the great effort he put in to transforming the Ethiopian economy.

One fears for the stability of Ethiopia upon his death because you know that the Ethiopian state is fairly fragile and there is a lot of ethnic violence… I don’t know that [Ethiopian politicians] are sufficiently prepared for a succession: this is my fear, that there may be a falling out within the ruling movement.

👉 Jacob Zuma, South African President

It is an absolute tragedy for Africa and the people of Ethiopia to mourn such an exceptional leader who contributed as an active role-player in various continental and global initiatives.

Prime Minister Meles Zenawi had been a strong leader, not only for his country but on the African continent, acting as mediator on numerous talks, particularly in the Horn of Africa region.

👉 Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia

Meles Zenawi was an economic transformer, he was a strong intellectual leader for the continent. In our regional meetings he stood out because of his intellect and his ability to respond and to lead dialogue on matters relating to African development. He will be missed in all of our meetings and all of our endeavour.

I don’t have fears [over the transition] because I believe there are many other leaders in Ethiopia who will get the support of regional leaders to make the transformation that is necessary, moving towards an open society.

👉 Ban Ki-moon, UN Secretary General

Prime Minister Zenawi will be remembered for his exceptional leadership and advocacy on African issues within and outside the continent, as well as for overseeing his country’s economic growth and development. The Secretary-General is grateful that Prime Minister Meles’s administration was a strong supporter of United Nations peacekeeping and peacemaking efforts.

The Secretary-General will remember, in particular, Prime Minister Meles for his active commitment to working with the United Nations on numerous global peace and development challenges, most recently his important role in the ongoing negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan, the Millennium Development Goals and climate change.

👉 Barnaba Benjamin, South Sudanese Information Minister

It’s a very, very sad day for the people of the Republic of South Sudan and the people of the East African region as a whole. This has been a tremendous nationalist leader, a president who had always let peace come to his neighbours.

We in South Sudan in particular, consider Ethiopia and especially Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, a strategic ally that (who) always never let a friend down. Indeed we greatly mourn him and we extend our extensive condolences to the people of Ethiopia.

👉 European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso

Prime Minister Meles was a respected African leader. He demonstrated his strong personal commitment over many years to improving the lives of not just his own but all African peoples, through his work on African unity, climate change, development and in promoting peace and stability, particularly in the Horn of Africa.

I sincerely hope that Ethiopia will enhance its path of democratisation, upholding of human rights and prosperity for its people, and of further regional stabilisation and integration.”

👉 Kenneth Kaunda, Zambia’s independence leader

He’s a young man who has contributed a lot to the development of Ethiopia, ever since he took over there has been some stability there, development in the economic field, there’s been development in the social field.

I knew him as a quiet man – smiling most of the time – and allowing you to feel at home in his presence.

👉 David Cameron, British Prime Minister

Prime Minister Meles was an inspirational spokesman for Africa on global issues and provided leadership and vision on Somalia and Sudan.

His personal contribution to Ethiopia’s development, in particular by lifting millions of Ethiopians out of poverty, has set an example for the region. Our thoughts are with his family and with the nation of Ethiopia. He will be greatly missed.

👉 Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair

It is with great sadness that I learned of Meles Zenawi’s death. He was a hugely significant figure in Ethiopia’s history, in particular helping guide his country from extreme poverty to an era of economic growth and development.

My deepest condolences go to his family and the people of Ethiopia.

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Shame on The BBC and Other Western Outlets Who are Silent in The Face of Huge Crimes in Ethiopia

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 28, 2020

BBC Glosses Ethiopia Horror

A feel-good headline on the BBC this week reads: “How a pariah and Nobel laureate became friends”. It was referring to the leaders of Eritrea and Ethiopia, as if their “friendship” was some kind of benign development to be lauded.

The feature article opens with: “In a sign of the changing political fortunes of a man who was once a pariah, Eritrea’s President Isaias Afwerki has proven to be a staunch ally of Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize winner and Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, giving his troops much-needed support to fight the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) in Tigray.”

The state-owned British broadcaster quotes the Ethiopian premier thanking Eritrea which “had fed, clothed and armed retreating Ethiopian soldiers when the TPLF first attacked them and seized their bases in Tigray, an Ethiopian region which borders Eritrea.” The BBC went on to note: “This was a significant acknowledgement by Mr Abiy, though he did not go as far as to admit claims that Mr Isaias, had also sent troops to help defeat the TPLF, a long-time foe of the Eritrean leader who has been in power since 1993.”

This is how the BBC and other Western media outlets are spinning cover for what is really going on in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray region. There is an ongoing aggression against the Tigray people by the Abiy regime which is referred to as the Ethiopian “government”. Abiy was never elected. He took power in early 2018 as part of a backroom political deal.

In his effort to crush the political opposition represented by the Tigray people and their political leadership, Abiy has enlisted the full military support of Eritrea to invade Tigray along with Abiy regime forces.

Eritrean military and paramilitaries are deep inside Tigray territory, killing civilians and looting the towns and villages with the collusion of the Ethiopian so-called Nobel laureate.

Abiy’s claims of launching a “law and order operation” to round up the Tigray “junta” which began on November is a sick joke. What was supposed to be a quick operation in the national interest has escalated into an ongoing guerrilla war which has seen millions of impoverished people turned into refugees internally and externally, with up to 45,000 fleeing to neighboring Sudan.

Sources in Tigray have confirmed the presence of Eritrean brigades – some even wearing Ethiopian national military garb – working alongside Abiy’s regime forces. Towns and villages have been shelled from Eritrea and hit by air strikes carried out by the Abiy regime.

UN human rights commissioner Michele Bachelet has condemned these massive violations, although she added that Tigray rebels have also perpetrated war crimes. The rebels have hit the Eritrean capital, Asmara, with rockets claiming retaliation.

The US State Department also stated that it had evidence of Eritrean forces deployed in Tigray region.

In the above BBC report it did refer to “unconfirmed claims” of atrocities carried out by Abiy regime and Eritrean forces.

Nevertheless, the main thrust of the BBC’s coverage has been to give more credibility to the version put out by the “Nobel-peace-prize-winning Prime Minister” Abiy Ahmed.

The reality is, however, that so-called laureate has ganged up with the Eritrean dictator to launch a war on the Tigray people. That’s what is really going on, yet the BBC would have us believe that these two de facto war criminals are “staunch allies” who have become unlikely “friends” as if it is a rosy story of political romance.

Since Abiy ascended to the premiership (and has postponed elections promised as part of his interim office), he has been waging a low-intensity war of aggression against the Tigray region. Electricity and water supply cuts over the past two years have worn the people down. Then he attempted a daring covert military operation on November 3 in collusion with Eritrean commandoes in the Tigray capital of Mekelle, according to local sources. The Tigray forces thwarted that offensive, which Abiy then fabricated as an unprovoked attack on the national army by “terrorists”.

The BBC and other Western media outlets have been dutifully spinning events in Ethiopia. Two years of hostility towards Tigray by the unelected Abiy regime has been spun as “reforms” by a “pro-democracy” figure. Now when this same figure is waging a genocide aided and abetted by a foreign army from Eritrea, the BBC is endeavoring to tell us this is a sign of “friendship”.

Shame on the BBC and other Western outlets who are silent in the face of huge crimes. Evidently, their condemnations only happen when it is politically expedient to undermine a nation which is an official enemy of Western governments.

Source

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Infos | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

WikiLeaks: Buying Silence: How The Saudi Foreign Ministry Controls Arab Media

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 22, 2015

MediaManipulation2

On Monday, Saudi Arabia celebrated the beheading of its 100th prisoner this year. The story was nowhere to be seen on Arab media despite the story’s circulation on wire services. Even international media was relatively mute about this milestone compared to what it might have been if it had concerned a different country. How does a story like this go unnoticed? 

Today’s release of the WikiLeaks “Saudi Cables” from the Saudi Ministry of Foreign Affairs show how it’s done.

The oil-rich Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and its ruling family take a systematic approach to maintaining the country’s positive image on the international stage. Most world governments engage in PR campaigns to fend off criticism and build relations in influential places. Saudi Arabia controls its image by monitoring media and buying loyalties from Australia to Canada and everywhere in between.

Documents reveal the extensive efforts to monitor and co-opt Arab media, making sure to correct any deviations in regional coverage of Saudi Arabia and Saudi-related matters. Saudi Arabia’s strategy for co-opting Arab media takes two forms, corresponding to the “carrot and stick” approach, referred to in the documents as “neutralisation” and “containment”. The approach is customised depending on the market and the media in question.

“Contain” and “Neutralise”

The initial reaction to any negative coverage in the regional media is to “neutralise” it. The term is used frequently in the cables and it pertains to individual journalists and media institutions whose silence and co-operation has been bought. “Neutralised” journalists and media institutions are not expected to praise and defend the Kingdom, only to refrain from publishing news that reflects negatively on the Kingdom, or any criticism of its policies. The “containment” approach is used when a more active propaganda effort is required. Journalists and media institutions relied upon for “containment” are expected not only to sing the Kingdom’s praises, but to lead attacks on any party that dares to air criticisms of the powerful Gulf state.

One of the ways “neutralisation” and “containment” are ensured is by purchasing hundreds or thousands of subscriptions in targeted publications. These publications are then expected to return the favour by becoming an “asset” in the Kingdom’s propaganda strategy. A document listing the subscriptions that needed renewal by 1 January 2010 details a series of contributory sums meant for two dozen publications in Damascus, Abu Dhabi, Beirut, Kuwait, Amman and Nouakchott. The sums range from $500 to 9,750 Kuwaiti Dinars ($33,000). The Kingdom effectively buys reverse “shares” in the media outlets, where the cash “dividends” flow the opposite way, from the shareholder to the media outlet. In return Saudi Arabia gets political “dividends” – an obliging press.

An example of these co-optive practices in action can be seen in an exchange between the Saudi Foreign Ministry and its Embassy in Cairo. On 24 November 2011 Egypt’s Arabic-language broadcast station ONTV hosted the Saudi opposition figure Saad al-Faqih, which prompted the Foreign Ministry to task the embassy with inquiring into the channel. The Ministry asked the embassy to find out how “to co-opt it or else we must consider it standing in the line opposed to the Kingdom’s policies”.

The document reports that the billionaire owner of the station, Naguib Sawiris, did not want to be “opposed to the Kingdom’s policies” and that he scolded the channel director, asking him “never to host al-Faqih again”. He also asked the Ambassador if he’d like to be “a guest on the show”.

The Saudi Cables are rife with similar examples, some detailing the figures and the methods of payment. These range from small but vital sums of around $2000/year to developing country media outlets – a figure the Guinean News Agency “urgently needs” as “it would solve many problems that the agency is facing” – to millions of dollars, as in the case of Lebanese right-wing television station MTV.

Confrontation

The “neutralisation” and “containment” approaches are not the only techniques the Saudi Ministry is willing to employ. In cases where “containment” fails to produce the desired effect, the Kingdom moves on to confrontation. In one example, the Foreign Minister was following a Royal Decree dated 20 January 2010 to remove Iran’s new Arabic-language news network, Al-Alam, from the main Riyadh-based regional communications satellite operator, Arabsat. After the plan failed, Saud Al Faisal sought to “weaken its broadcast signal”.

The documents show concerns within the Saudi administration over the social upheavals of 2011, which became known in the international media as the “Arab Spring”. The cables note with concern that after the fall of Mubarak, coverage of the upheavals in Egyptian media was “being driven by public opinion instead of driving public opinion”. The Ministry resolved “to give financial support to influential media institutions in Tunisia”, the birthplace of the “Arab Spring”.

The cables reveal that the government employs a different approach for its own domestic media. There, a wave of the Royal hand is all that is required to adjust the output of state-controlled media. A complaint from former Lebanese Prime Minister and Saudi citizen Saad Hariri concerning articles critical of him in the Saudi-owned Al-Hayat and Asharq Al-Awsat newspapers prompted a directive to “stop these type of articles” from the Foreign Ministry.

This is a general overview of the Saudi Foreign Ministry’s strategy in dealing with the media. WikiLeaks’ Saudi Cables contain numerous other examples that form an indictment of both the Kingdom and the state of the media globally.

Source

WikiLeaks Begins Releasing Leaked Saudi Arabia Cables

Was the following BBC program influenced by the Saudis? Pay attention to the results of the vote on the motion after the debate:

Should the West get out of bed with the House of Saud?

Another curiosity…

Why did “YouTube” decide to remove the following video I uploaded ( Saudi Arabian Family Hang an Ethiopian Woman From Hook) about the Saudi atrocities against Ethiopians? My upload was done on November 26, 2013, but YouTube decided to remove it two years later, after 7.000 views. The real reason? Mind you, extremely violent videos (including barbaric beheading) are all over the YouTube platform.

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Posted in Curiosity, Infos, Media & Journalism | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

BBC ‘Kill The Christians’ – At Last, Thank God, But Please Don’t Leave It There

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on April 18, 2015

Reblogged from “Achbishop Cranmer

keep-calm-and-kill-christians-4As regular readers of His Grace’s blog will be fully aware, the plight of Christians around the world is a subject that is discussed frequently on these pages. I sometimes wonder if such repetition will turn people away in a ‘read that; been there before’ approach, but as long as such intense suffering continues, given the nature of this site’s religio-political focus, there is an overwhelming duty to speak up and attempt to lay the facts bare.

The Bible is very clear that Christianity is not a private faith. When anyone makes the decision to follow Jesus, they become part of the biggest family on earth. During the Church of England’s baptism liturgy, the congregation welcomes in the newly-baptised with these words:

There is one Lord, one faith, one baptism.

..by one Spirit we are all baptised into one body.

All: We welcome you into the fellowship of faith;

we are children of the same heavenly Father;

we welcome you.

My Christian family is not just my local church, but the global one. My attitude towards Christians in Pakistan or China should be no different from those I know in my local congregation. Anyone who has had even a smattering of religious education should know that Jesus calls us to love our neighbours, and the story of the Good Samaritan plainly clarifies that we should make no distinctions as to who we consider our neighbour to be. However, the New Testament writers also exhort Christians to be especially vigilant regarding the welfare of their fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. In Jesus’ parable of the Sheep and the Goats (Mt 25: 31-46), it is not difficult to argue that when the king declares, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me,’ he is referring specifically to God’s people, i.e., Christians, and not to humanity as a whole.

This is why the reports that have poured in over the last year, telling of the brutal and horrific treatment of Christian communities in the Middle East, have been so disturbing. In actual fact, the drawn-out eradication of Christians from the region has been going on for a good deal longer, but with ISIS’s inhuman treatment of anyone they choose to hate, this has been brought sharply into focus. Through the work of Christian charities such as Open Doors and Christian Solidarity Worldwide and, in particular, Canon Andrew White, the ‘Vicar of Baghdad’, this persecution has not gone unnoticed well beyond our Sunday church congregations. The secular media has increasingly taken up the cause of Christians suffering most frequently at the hands of intolerant Islam. A growing number of parliamentarians are also voicing their concerns.

One of the exceptions, though, has been the BBC. In its coverage of world affairs and the Middle East, the persecution of Christians, while not entirely ignored, proportionally receives little attention. When ISIS drove the Yazidis out of their homes and into the mountains of Iraq last year, it made the BBC’s headlines. It rightly deserved attention, but the Christians who were experiencing exactly the same treatment (and were also much larger in number) were mentioned far less. If this is still a Christian country, as David Cameron often likes to remind us, then it becomes even more irksome that the BBC, for whatever reason, devotes such little attention to (for example) the fact that the Christian population in Iraq alone has collapsed to a tiny percentage of the millions who lived there prior to the fall of Saddam Hussein. This is one of the biggest stories to have come out of the troubles in the Middle East, and yet the BBC has barely mentioned it in all of its coverage of the multiple conflicts.

So, when Jane Corbin’s Kill the Christians aired on BBC2 this week, it was a welcome surprise. Such a programme covering the situation for Christians in the Middle East is long overdue, but at least the BBC has finally begun to catch up with the rest of us. It was never going to be a perfect programme: squeezing a whistle-stop tour of Christian communities in Syria, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon and Palestine into an hour could scarcely give all situations the level of attention each deserves. When the wait has been so long, expectations inevitably increase. And, on the whole, Jane Corbin did a thorough job of telling the story of a few individuals and the dislocation of their communities as they have fled the deadly violence of the ISIS.

Ed West has written a sound review of the programme for the Catholic Herald, but I want to highlight a number of factors that stood out as I watched it. The first was the complete contrast between the Christians interviewed and the actions of their aggressors. Footage of both Muslims and Christians, just moments before their execution at the hands of black-clad ISIS soldiers, was flashed up at regular intervals. This was greatly disturbing, but still failed to convey the scale of their sickening disregard for the lives of others. It was perhaps best summed up by 13-year-old Nardine. She had escaped the invasion of her village in northern Iraq, but was fully aware that if they had caught her she would now be either dead or imprisoned as a sex slave. The look on her face as she considered the Yazidi girls who had suffered that fate was haunting.

Whilst ISIS were depicted sowing fear and terror, Christians were seen feeding, sheltering and caring for the suffering and displaced irrespective of their beliefs – for Muslims as much as their fellow Christians. Even with the little that they had, they were doing their utmost for others. One Muslim bluntly stated that without the survival of Christianity in the Middle East, moderate Islam is also doomed. In countries with diverse and complex religions and histories, Christianity has provided a level of stability and cohesion. As this fades away, so does the chance of long-term peace between the different strands of Islam.

And little hope remains. Where Christians have fled persecution in their droves in the face of the utterly intolerant Saudi-Salafist strain of Islam and the increased sectarian violence between Sunnis and Shias, it is impossible to see them returning in any great number, if at all. If they are able to find better homes elsewhere, what would bring them back? The only place in the Middle East where the Christian population is secure and growing is Israel, and yet, for some strange reason, Jane Corbin told us the complete opposite. Strangely, too, she blamed Israel for the exodus of Christians from Bethlehem and the Palestinian territories. What the programme failed to mention is that since Hamas came to power, there has been a marked increase in incitement and violence by Muslims against Christians throughout Palestine. This subtle anti-Israeli rhetoric was uncalled for, and an unnecessary blot on an otherwise well-researched documentary. It would seem to be that this Twitter comment from journalist Nelson Jones has some weight:

Maybe it was? If so, thank you, Jane Corbin and the BBC, for at long last sharing the stories of just a handful of Christians in the Middle East. It was better than might have been expected, despite one grating flaw. But there is so much more to say. You could, for example, devote a whole programme to the experiences of Andrew White in Baghdad. Archbishop Justin Welby has visited Iraq and has plenty of informed opinion which could also be reported. Please don’t leave it here, thinking you’ve fulfilled your Christian-persecution quota. You have only just begun to scratch the surface, and the world needs to hear much more. Politically-correct sensibilities and the fear of causing offence should never be allowed to hide the truth of this genocidal ‘cleansing’.

As a final thought, it was quite remarkable to observe that none of the Christians who were interviewed had questioned their faith: their resilience was stoic, and at no time did they express doubt in God. We live in a country where Christianity is often derided and discarded; where God is disparagingly referred to as a magical fairy or ‘sky pixie’. But, for these Christians who have so much to lose simply by staying true to their faith, they find in God not empty indifference, but strength and unending hope. The wisdom of Nardine, despite her young age, was profound:

The Christian religion is about love and peace. I feel very sad because the Devil has taken over the Islamic State. I will pray to God to enlighten their minds. Whatever happens, we will not give up our religion. We will not abandon Christianity, never.

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Calls for BBC Reporter to Resign After He Told Daughter of Holocaust Survivors in Paris

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on January 12, 2015

  • Tim Willcox was covering yesterday’s Paris rally for the BBC News channel
  • He spoke to participants during a live broadcast from the streets of Paris
  • One woman he spoke to expressed fears Jews were being persecuted
  • She told him ‘the situation is going back to the days of the 1930s’
  • Willcox replied: ‘Many critics though of Israel’s policy would suggest that the Palestinians suffer hugely at Jewish hands as well’
  • Comments sparked anger and calls for him to resign
  • Willcox has apologized for offense caused by poorly phrased question

Journalist Tim Willcox sparked anger during his coverage of yesterday’s rally in Paris, held in memory of the 17 victims of last week’s terror attacks, including four Jewish people in a siege at a Kosher supermarket.

During a live report from the streets of Paris, Willcox was speaking to a number of participants in the march, including one woman who expressed her fears that Jews were being persecuted, and ‘the situation is going back to the days of the 1930s in Europe.’

Many viewers also used the social network to express their anger and concerns over Willcox’s rally coverage, including historian and BBC presenter Simon Schama.

He wrote on Twitter: ‘Appalling of @BBCTimWillcox to imply any and all JEWS (not Israelis) responsible for treatment of Palestinians by hectoring lady in Paris.’

And added: ‘Then he had gall to patronise her at the end – “you see people see it from all sides” That Palestinian plight justifies anti-semitic murder?’

Jewish Chronicle editor Stephen Pollard also joined the debate, tweeting: ‘What is @BBCTimWillcox’s problem with Jews? Once is problematic. Twice is a pattern.’

The Campaign Against Antisemitism, which works to combat anti-Semitism in Britain, has circulated footage of the incident, and has called on those offended by it to formally complain to the BBC.

Director of communications, Jonathan Sacerdoti, told MailOnline Willcox’s Twitter apology was ‘not really good enough’.

It’s an admission he has done something wrong, but it’s incumbent on the BBC to make an on-air apology and to investigate his behaviour.’

The BBC’s Tim Wilcox projects the last two hundred years of European anti-Jewish ideology on an elderly French woman

Wilcox was interviewing a French Jewish woman with limited English skills at yesterday’s anti-terrorism rally. The rally, of course, came in the wake of the murder of four French Jews at a kosher supermarket, in the broader context of widespread violence against Jews in France by Islamists. When she noted that Jews are being targeted in France, Wilcox interjected that “many critics though of Israel’s policy would suggest that the Palestinians suffer hugely at Jewish hands as well.” The woman tried to object, but Wilcox added that surely she understands that people see such things from different perspectives.

My friend Hill Wellford commented on Facebook with a brief but extremely insightful analysis, which aptly sums up how Wilcox’s interjection reflects a strain of European thought that helped lead to the Holocaust, and which the Holocaust obviously did not extinguish: “Interesting that there are two contradictory assumptions made at the same time. First, that Jews aren’t really Europeans even when they live in Europe; instead, they are Israelis or at least some form of collectively non-European other. Second, that Jews in Israel/Palestine are not really from there, either, but are some sort of colonizers that is oppressing the natives. The assumption seems to be that Jews are a stateless people, deserving to call nowhere home, but a coherent one that must answer for its collective guilt.” Yes, that about sums up modern European anti-Semitism, which undoubtedly infects the consciousness even of those who don’t consciously harbor ill-will toward Jews, and which we saw in the U.S. reflected recently in the remarks of (thankfully now former) Yale Episcopal chaplain Bruce Shipman.

You can watch the interview on Youtube here.

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BBC-Darling & The Most Trusted Man in Britain Says “Starve Ethiopians!”

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 21, 2013

And if you had been from the world, the world would have loved its own; but you are not from the world, but I have chosen you from the world; because of this the world hates you.” [ John 15:19]

Speaking to the BBC Radio 4 Today programme,  Sir. David Attenborough said:

”If you were living in Ethiopia, you might be justified in thinking that the natural world is already stopping it by starvation.”

AnthonyHThis guy obviously is Ethiophobic. Everytime he opens his mouth he reveals his hatred for Christians and Ethiopians. Everything he says is absolutely crass in its callousness!

The highly decorated psychopath, David Attenborough, who last year described humans (Ethiopians) as a ‘plague on Earth’, has now gone on record this Christmas season in calling for rich nations of the world to stop sending food aid to starving nations in order to reduce the population of the world.

According to him, rich nations should start with starving poorer nations that have already been decimated by first world global powers (and could be fed with about a week or so of military spending). The problem, Attenborough says, however, comes down to numerous “huge sensitivities” that continue to block the goal of massive population reduction.

Perhaps the most alarming thing to note here is that this evil who justifies his genocide with faulty reasoning is considered a ‘national treasure’ in Britain. Better yet, Attenborough also has 31 honorary degrees from British universities, which is more than any other person. This is in addition to his numerous ‘royal’ titles.

Truly, Attenborough’s comments being met with mainstream media attention in a positive light shows just how far gone the media world is. Ultimately, there is a war on our right to not only have a family and basic necessities, but life itself.

Almost all the people who are obsessed about population – and the ‘naturalists’ and environmentalists who sound off about big families, belong to the class – white, middle class, anguished liberals – who are themselves least likely to have children to excess or to have children at all.

So, actually, Attenborough and the current global elites are the true “plagues”. They know who they are, all of them. They know how millions of Ethiopians have been exterminated through the wars, diseases and famines they’ve created. They sense it their time here on is up Earth, in their advanced ages, they can feel what is awaiting them in the afterlife.

Besides, people are finally waking up to see through the illusion we have been living in for centuries. These evils realize now they can no longer convince the masses to kill ourselves in the wars, the diseases, the famines they constantly create. In their greed and lust for total control they will do what ever they must to get what they want and are revealing the evil they are to the world. The wider world will soon learn that starving our countries has been a plan of long standing. What has happened to Ethiopia in the 1970/1980s, what’s going in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Central African Republic and South Sudan are all part of this diabolic plan of theirs. All mineral rich, jungle abundant (Oxygen bank for Europe) and predominantly Christian countries.

These dark entities are so intoxicated on power and control they are oblivious to the transparency of their lies and corruption. They believe their lives are more worthy than ours. These sick animals are who humanity will be fighting in the near future.

In a rational and humane world, these cowards should also be charged on grounds of racism and genocide when they make it so abundantly clear that they are singling out Ethiopians and other Africans as undeserving of survival.

Mind you, Attenborough never ever opened his mouth to blame Muslims for overpopulation. He can’t spot the islamic scavengers who are breeding fast to feed on the spiritually dying children of the once Great Britain. The Muslims who are abusing and raping his daughters and murdering his soldiers in the streets of London and Bristol. Isn’t it ironic, the British are now being colonized by the very same people they once colonized?

[Psalms 58:1-2]

Do you really speak what is right when silent? Do you judge fairly the children of humankind? No, in your heart you plan injustices; in the land you weigh out the violence of your hands.

BBC Criticised For Giving Extremist Preacher Airtime

The BBC is fast becoming a national disgrace and even a danger to the well-being of the nation

BBCBi

BBC criticised over its “extraordinary” decision to give extremist preacher Anjem Choudary a platform to attack “British values” during discussion about the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby.

The BBC is facing a backlash after allowing Anjem Choudary, an extremist preacher, air-time on one of its flagship programmes to discuss the murder of Lee Rigby.

Mr Choudary refused to condemn the killers of the soldier when asked on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, and said the cause of the murder was “David Cameron and his foreign policy.”

The corporation came under fierce criticism for giving Mr Choudary a platform to air his views, which included him saying consequences of British foreign policy were being seen on the streets of London and that he didn’t believe in democracy.

Continue reading…

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‘BBC’ Darling, Calling Arabs to Fight Against Africans

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on June 14, 2013

ThirstyBirdMy Note: Abdel Bari Atwan, who once was on Colonel Gaddafi’s payroll, is urging Arabs to unite behind Egypt to defeat, what he calls, the Afro-Israeli conspirators who are planning to block the river Nile.

This disgraceful editor-in-chief of the pan-Arab daily, “Al Quds al Arabi” — who often appears on the BBC and CNN, has been a big supporter of terror attacks on Israel. His anti-Israel, anti-US and anti-Christian stance is so obvious, yet, the BBC & co give him a prominent platform to spread misinformation and disinformation

He is, of course one of those people who speak differently in Arabic and in English. He once said:

If you support the Palestinian resistance, you do not consider Bin Laden’s attacks terrorism”Abdul Bari Atwan, a London-based journalist and editor of Al Quds Al Arabi, told Egypt’s ON TV, when asked if Bin Laden was a terrorist, that:“If you support the Palestinian resistance, you do not consider [Bin Laden’s attacks] terrorism. But if you are with America, Europe, and Israel, you do consider it terrorism. It depends on your definition of terrorism … Whoever fights America and its enterprise in the region, and whoever fights Israel and the American occupation, is not considered a terrorist by me.”

How this wicked individual has become a regular contributor to BBC Dateline and writes for The Guardian poses a riddle to me.

This’s what he wrote on the Nile issue:

On Tuesday, Egyptians woke up to news from Ethiopia that it intends to complete the ‘Rennaissance Dam’ on the Blue Nile. The river currently supplies 85 percent of downstream Egypt’s water. Such a step would not only affect Egypt’s water supply but would also impede electricity production at the mega, hydro-powered Aswan Dam.

Several Egyptian newspapers used the story of Ethiopia’s planned and its impact on Egypt’s national security to attack Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi. They said he must bear responsibility for Ethiopia’s decision, accusing him of ignoring this critical issue, even though it was not dealt with by the previous regime.

Ethiopia began construction of the dam in 2011, at a cost of $4.7 billion, with support from Israel. The plan is to use hydro-power to generate electricity and turn the Renaissance Dam into a major source of energy in Africa.

The main threat to Egypt, however, does not lie in generating electricity or diverting the river. The main problem is that Ethiopia is also building an industrial lake to store 74 billion cubic metres of water, greatly reducing Egypt’s quota of water.

The initial results of such water shortage would lead to the suspension of turbines that generate electricity in the Aswan Dam, in turn having a significant impact on agricultural land.

Egypt’s previous regime lacked a suitable policy for working with Nile Basin countries. Hosni Mubarak’s government was arrogant in its dealing with Sudan for over ten years, a stance which led Israel to intervene, confronting Egypt and paving the way for this threat to its national security and economy.

Israel’s Foreign Minister at the time, Avigdor Lieberman, who had once threatened to bomb the Aswan Dam, led an Israeli delegation comprising businesspeople and engineering experts across five African countries in 2011. The minister said Israel was ready to support dam-building and the diversion of Nile water. The visit led to the signing of Entebbe agreement between Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda and Congo. Burundi pledged not to sign the agreement, but soon caved in.

Motivated by political and commercial self-interest, Israel’s interference was not surprising – nor was the subsequent involvement of several Israeli firms in the resulting mega-projects, including an agreement to distribute the energy produced by the new dams.

Hosni Mubarak made disastrous mistakes in dealing with the water issue, Ethiopia’s water projects and Israeli threats to Egypt’s security. The government also exaggerated the issue of Halayeb and Shalateen to wage war against Sudan and the regime of President Omar al-Bashir.

Following a failed assassination attempt on Mubarak in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, the Egyptian government turned on the Sudanese regime, accusing it of being complicit in the incident. Mubarak opened an embassy for the head of the rebel movement, expressing his support for South Sudan.

Another mistake made by the former Egyptian regime was that it failed to strengthen its relations with Horn of Africa states, including Eritrea, Somalia and Djibouti. A number of these countries treat Ethiopia as an enemy due to Ethiopia’s historic occupation of their lands.

Aboud El-Zomor, a senior official from Egypt’s Building and Development Party, has claimed the Ethiopian move to build a dam is “a declaration of war.” He has urged President Morsi’s regime to respond firmly, knowing full well that the current economic conditions in Egypt could prevent such a response.

The Nile water dilemma has been one that previous rulers of Egypt have struggled to deal with. History tells us that Muhammad Ali Pasha established a military force to interfere immediately if Ethiopia or any other country threatened Egypt’s water interests.

Often nations – both civilized and uncivilized states – manage to unite when they face a crisis which affects the whole state; throughout history, government and opposition forces have come together and set their differences aside to confront a potential threat to national security. Unfortunately, this is not the case in Egypt today. Instead, we’re seeing a brutal political and media war that threatens to destroy Egypt’s national unity.

Egypt is an easy target. It is surrounded by potential threats on all sides. Sinai is a semi-failed state in the East. Libya is a failed state in the West. Civil wars have destroyed Sudan from the East, West and South. Israel conspires against all of them in the North, while the Egyptian state has internal problems too.

The sad truth is that Egypt’s strongest supporters in the past were Syria and Iraq. Now the Gulf States have turned against these countries and Egypt faces its problems alone.

I support Egypt and its people, and wish they would confront the conspiracies that target its national security. Egypt’s people face Israeli manipulations in Africa, the collapse of its state machinery and starvation. All of the above, plus the collusion of internal elements with foreign powers to destabilise Egypt are red lines that should unite all political forces in the country.

Egypt needs a strong and wise administration to confront the current crises. A government which gives priority to the national interests of the country. I have confidence in the Egyptian people, their leadership and their military institutions that are loyal to Egypt.

Once united, the Arab nation can never be defeated.

Source

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The UN, IOC, BBC: anti-Semitic?

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on July 24, 2012

The number 40 is significant in Jewish and Christian traditions. It can represent an estimate, or many of something.

Judaism

  • Rain fell for “forty days and forty nights” during the flood

  • Spies explored the land of Israel for “forty days.” (Numbers 13)

  • The Hebrew people lived in the Sinai desert for “forty years”. This period of years represents the time it takes for a new generation to arise.

  • Moses’ life is divided into three 40-year segments, separated by his fleeing from Egypt, and his return to lead his people out.

  • Several Jewish leaders and kings are said to have ruled for “forty years”, that is, a generation. (Examples: Eli, Saul, David, Solomon.)

  • Goliath challenged the Israelites twice a day for forty days before David defeated him.

  • Moses spent three consecutive periods of “forty days and forty nights” on Mount Sinai:Christianity

Christianity

  • Before the temptation of Christ, Jesus fasted “Forty days and forty nights” in the Judean desert.

  • Forty days was the period from the resurrection of Jesus to the ascension of Jesus.

  • In modern Christian practice, Lent consists of the 40 days preceding Easter. In much of Western Christianity, Sundays are excluded from the count; in Eastern Christianity, Sundays are included.

  • In the Old Testament, it rained for 40 days and 40 nights in the great flood in which all land living being perished except those on Noah’s ark.

Muslims Barred IOC from Honoring Murdered Israelis

On the 40th annivarsary of the Munich massacre, an Olympics official admitted that Muslim countries blocked the “One-Minute of Silence” campaign to honor the 11 murdered Israeli athletes, one of the widows said.

Ankie Spitzer, whose husband Andre was one of the athletes massacred in the Munich Games n 1972, told the European Jewish Press that Jacques Rogge, president of the London Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games, told her that his “hands were tied” by the admission of 46 Arab and Muslim members to the International Olympic Committee.

She replied, “My husband’s hands were tied, not yours.”

Continue reading…

When eight Palestinians had shot their way into the Israeli house, the “innocence of sport” died. Read it here.

BBC says: „Israel has no capital city”

It’s amazing to see that the BBC has manifested its anti-Israel and pro-Palestine stand in its online Olympic coverage in which every participating nation had its capital city listed, bar the state of Israel, which was left blank. Yet the non-state of Palestine had its capital listed as ‘East Jerusalem’. Despite Israel’s seat of government – the Knesset – being in Jerusalem, and despite a plethora of foreign embassies being located in Tel Aviv, the BBC opted to identify neither as Israel’s capital city. And yet, despite the Palestinian seat of government being in Ramallah, and despite Jerusalem not being divided, the BBC opted to carve the East away and hand it, lock, stock and barrel (Temple Mount, Western Wall and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre) to the self-proclaimed Palestinian Authority.

 

Continue reading…

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The World’s Changing — The Media Isn’t

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 28, 2009

What do Ethiopia, Israel and Christianity have in common? The answer is: the three are permanently ridiculed and bashed by the self-hating world liberal media,

What do negative media images, conveyed by mainstream Western Media about Ethiopia communicate? What darkness prevails in the mind of the producer(s)? What gains for whom derive from journalistic bombast and unmitigated stereotype of the whole Ethiopian nation?

Nouns and adjectives like famine, drought, hunger, disease, AIDS, tribe, tribalism, underdeveloped, third world, dictatorship, corruption, over population, war, civil war, etc., are yet pervasive when Ethiopia is the story.

Ethiopia’s image in the Western Media is not a self-portrait. It is not a what you see is what you get. Because media conditioning shapes, molds, and monopolizes those images, references to Ethiopia are received sometimes with disdain and contempt. Even some Ethiopian descendants, who have virtually no cultural and moral competence, actually contribute to how Ethiopia is projected globally. Ashamed of their recent “heritage and socioeconomic development” some popular Ethiopian news-makers and blogs side with media characterizations projected through stories, datelines, specials, documentaries and nightline episodes. This attitude, while supremely disturbing, also abets the media-as if they need assistance-in defaming Ethiopia.

Of course, I don’t dare to blame for Ethiopia’s woes solely on the Western medias. They have been sufficiently aided and abetted by inept, corrupt and short-sighted political leadership and intellectuals who in my opinion must take most of the blame. Political figures and leading personalities who sold their souls to the Devil are the first who are exposing their people to all sorts of ignorance and exploitation

Yet, this permanent portrayals of Ethiopia in a bad light can only spread and prolong ignorance in a world much closer in proximity than ever before a media industry that thrives on the negative.

Ethiopia’s negative and contrived image, promoted in the Mainstream Media, pervades the psyche, pre-empts behaviors, infers worthlessness, and devalues the mind, while it attenuates human spirituality and connectivity: key ingredients in equitable planetary wealth sharing.

I wonder why the likes of the BBC have devoted a great deal of their resources and energy toward painting Ethiopia in a negative light for such a long time.

Those so affected by this practice must not only instigate its demise, but also they must independently try to research, investigate and study why these media-outlets are meanwhile famous to report in a meanspirited manner about our country.

Ethiopians attack BBC’s doom-laden coverage

I was expecting to see Ethiopian blogs post this particular news. None of them did, what a shame!

Ethiopian tour operators, in London for this month’s World Travel Market, have addressed a furious open letter to the BBC’s Director General, concerning the Corporation’s recent coverage of the drought in Ethiopia. The letter, signed by some 25 companies, accuses the BBC of casually dramatizing its broadcasts with footage from the infamous 1984 famine.

“Ethiopia,” they wrote, “has changed beyond all recognition since 1984, yet the BBC insists on showing images from that time. They are very intrusive and are deeply upsetting to many millions of Ethiopians.”

But beyond the matter of stung pride, the tour operators insist that the “doom-laden scenario” implied by the BBC’s use of old newsreel damages the national image, deterring foreign investment and scaring off tourists. “Investment, trade and tourism are key to Ethiopia’s development,” they claim “more so than aid.”

Which is true. The tourism industry currently accounts for approximately five per cent of Ethiopia’s GDP and tourism is a “featured component” of the government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. With about 400,000 tourists a year, the country is still not exactly a hotspot, but adroit marketing of events like the 2007 ‘millennium’ and the annual Addis ‘Marathon’ (10km) have seen visitor numbers increase steadily over the last five years (visitors, incidentally, who invariably comment on green the country is).

Continue reading…

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