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Posts Tagged ‘Armenians’

New Video Shows Erdogan Watching His Armed Thugs Beat Protesters, Journalists in Washington DC

Posted by addisethiopia on May 19, 2017

Erdoğan’s security detail were allegedly involved in the fights. The police did their best to stop the skirmish.

The video shows Turkish President Erdogan watching as his armed thugs beat protesters and journalists in Washington DC.

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SHOKING VIDEO: Turkey Erdogan’s Bodyguards Brutally Attack Armenian Christian Protesters in Washington DC

Posted by addisethiopia on May 17, 2017

Let the world see and learn how savage and barbaric the Turks are. If they do this, as guests, in a free country, imagine how they treat Christians and Kurds in their savage country.

A demonstration outside the Turkish Embassy in northwest Washington led to nine people being injured, and two arrested. UNBELIEVABLE!

This is MINGBOGGLING, INSANE! Turkish Bodyguards with guns attacking people in Washington DC! Just SHOKING! And the police is watching how they beat unarmed people. OUTRAGEOUS!

The Antichrist beast believes the world belongs to it. The inbreed Turks are attacking Armenians and Kurds, kicking and hitting women and innocent protesters – as if they are still in Turkey. Only cowards attack older men and women, only cowards attack in a number 50 vs 10.

COWARD Turks

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Christian Genocide | Turks Tore The Pregnant Woman’s Womb, Took Off The Baby And Put It On Her Breast“

Posted by addisethiopia on April 24, 2017

I was a 6-year-old child when my mother entrusted me to the American orphanage and promised to take me back. There was an Armenian church outside the orphanage fence where Turks often appeared and tormented Armenian women and children. When those people looked inside our windows, we tremulously ran away. One of the orphans, Sako, once called us to watch what was going on beyond the fence. It was awful…

Turks tore the pregnant woman’s womb, took off the baby and put it on her breast. I fainted…When I opened my eyes, the orphans had surrounded me telling terrible stories with frightened looks. I closed my ears and screamed.” Her mother found her after the massacres, and they moved together to the village of Basargechar where she married Yeghishe Markosian and gave birth to 11 children. She died in 1990.

Denial is The Final Stage of Genocide

Within in a 2-year period 1.5 million Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire were massacred by the Turkish. To this day it is illegal to talk about the Armenian Genocide in Turkey.

On April 25, 1915 through a series of brutal events, the Turkish government began their execution of the Armenians. The Turks burned, drowned, starved, crucified and slaughtered in the pursuit to eliminate christian Armenians.

There had always been trouble between the Christian Armenians and the Turks in the Ottoman Empire. The Armenians were taxed more for being Christian, and often not treated fairly. They turned to Russia for freedom and independence. It was during World War I, that the Armenians sided with Russia against Turkey, in response came the Genocide.

Today, April 24th marks the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Still a century later people refuse to acknowledge the massacres as a genocide including the Turks. Many spoke out, showing their support as the anniversary approached including Germany, the European Parliament, Pope Francis, François Hollande the French president and Vladimir Putin.

Armenian President Serzh Sarksyan spoke the following statement: “Recognition of the genocide is a triumph of human conscience and justice over intolerance and hatred.”

What happened to the Armenians during World War I inspired Hitler during World War II in his genocide of the Jewish people. Hitler spoke to the commanding generals at Obersalzberg on August 22, 1939 and declared:

I have issued the command – and I’ll have anybody who utters but one word of criticism executed by a firing squad – that our war aim does not consist in reaching certain lines, but in the physical destruction of the enemy. Accordingly, I have placed my death-head formations in readiness – for the present only in the East – with orders to them to send to death mercilessly and without compassion, men, women, and children of Polish derivation and language. Only thus shall we gain the living space (lebensraum) which we need. Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?”

Christian Bale Historic Romance The Promise Is Targeted By Turkish Online Trolls Who Deny The Armenian Genocide

Lost Evidence Of Armenian Genocide Discovered In Jerusalem Archive

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Remembering the Armenians of Ethiopia

Posted by addisethiopia on May 14, 2015

At the beginning of March, a Requiem was offered for my parents and for the Sevadjian clan, and it transported me back 40 years to when I had last been to a service in the magnificent church of my childhood: the St. George Armenian Apostolic Church in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The church and the cross on its dome stood out against a perfect blue sky. I went in and lit a candle. The altar curtain was pulled across as it was Lent. I looked up at the azure ceiling and the chandeliers. Light was streaming through the stained glass windows into the chorister’s gallery. It was a moving and beautiful experience. The sonorous tones of Vartkes Nalbandian and the clear soprano of Salpi Nalbandian made me very emotional. It was not possible to have a full Badarak as Vartkes is a deacon, and there is no longer an Armenian priest in residence in Ethiopia.

I stood and listened and prayed. I thought of all the Yetovbahayer who had prayed in that church, who had made up the richest and most vibrant foreign community in Ethiopia, their numbers now dwindled to less than 100 souls. Philanthropists, industrialists, businessmen, talented men and women, and most of all, artisans, artisans, and more artisans. What a great number of them there were!

Boghos Markarian, who arrived in 1866 and supplied goods and arms to the courts of Emperor Yohannes and later Emperor Menelik II, was one of the first Armenians to settle in Ethiopia in modern times. By the late 1960’s, the Armenians numbered some 1,200.

There had been Armenians in Ethiopia long, long before then, as early as the 13th century, but a real community with significant numbers was only established in the early 1900’s when many left their ancestral homes in the Ottoman Empire and found a safe haven in Christian Ethiopia. Another wave of Armenians arrived in the 1920’s. Thereafter the numbers increased as people married, invited cousins and other relatives to join them from wherever they had ended up—mostly Syria and Lebanon—after the genocide.

The Armenians who settled in Ethiopia before the 1920’s, and those who arrived after 1945, were mostly well educated; they were doctors, dentists, chemists, architects, engineers, lawyers, and accountants. Many of those who arrived in the 1920’s as a direct consequence of the genocide were artisans; they were tailors, watchmakers, cobblers, and carpet makers. Thus in almost every trade, profession, and industry, there were Armenians in Addis Ababa. They had come from a very wide area of the Ottoman Empire and brought with them the special expertise of their hometowns.

Addis Ababa boasted a large number of remarkably skilled jewelers. One of the first was Dikran Ebeyan, who had arrived from Constantinople. He had the distinction of making the coronation crowns of Emperors Yohannes in 1881 and Menelik II in 1889.

Should you visit any jewelry shop in Addis Ababa today, you will see filigree work in gold and silver. This skill was introduced and taught to Ethiopian artisans by Armenian craftsmen.

A visit to the Armenian cemetery gives an idea of the origins of the three major waves of Armenian immigrants, mirroring the tragedies that befell their homeland: First came those from Constantinople, Aintab, Arapkir, Kharpert; then Adana and Van; then Marash, Sparta, and Smyrna.

It is difficult to overestimate the contribution that Armenians made in their 100 years in Ethiopia. Armenians moved with Emperor Menelik II from Harar to Addis Ababa and helped build a modern capital city. There is not enough space here to describe all their important and lasting contributions, in trade, industry, and government, but a few must be mentioned as they are truly exceptional.

ArmeniansInEthiopia

Firstly, there were two great philanthropists whose legacies live on today. One was Mihran Mouradian, a merchant, who built the church that was consecrated in 1935. The other was Matig Kevorkoff, who in 1923 built a modern school to unite the two schools that had previously divided the community. Kevorkoff was a French citizen who grew up in Egypt and moved to Djibouti at the age of 29 to pursue a highly successful career as a merchant of tobacco and other commodities. During the fascist occupation of Ethiopia (1936-41), because of his French nationality, all of his assets were confiscated by the Italians as “enemy property.” Kevorkoff died in penury in Marseille in the early 1950’s.

Among a number of amusing stories of the arbitrary ways Armenians ended up in Ethiopia is that of the Darakdjians. Stepan Darakdjian left Kharpert in 1912 and made his way to Egypt, hoping to immigrate to America. A requirement for a visa to America was an examination for trachoma. While waiting to be seen by the eye doctor, he went to an Armenian cafe, where he fell into conversation with a man named Hovhannes Assadourian, who had just returned from Ethiopia. Assadourian said, “You are a tanner. Why go to America? Go to Ethiopia where they need shoes!” So Stepan Darakdjian made his way to Harar and set up a tannery in partnership with another Armenian called Karikian. Later on, his son, Mardiros, moved to Addis Ababa where he founded a modern tannery in Akaki and a shoe factory called Darmar (Darakdjian Mardiros). Later still, he branched out into many other businesses and became very wealthy. The factory and shops still exist with the old sign of a lion (which looks very much like the Metro Goldwyn Mayer one), but the shops are now called Ambassa (lion).

Two of the earliest settlers, Hovsep Behesnilian and Sarkis Terzian, made their fortunes by supplying arms to Emperor Menelik II during his 1896 war against the invading Italians. The Behesnilian name lives on in perhaps the largest and most successful conglomerate in Ethiopia, HAGBES, founded by Hovsep’s nephew, Hagop Behesnilian, still privately owned, and employing some 1,000 people.

Continue reading…

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Pope Francis Visit: Turkey’s Christians Face Tense Times

Posted by addisethiopia on November 27, 2014

  • “No country in the region – including Iran – is as homogenous in terms of Islam as Turkey”
  • The ethnic cleansing of these non-Muslim minorities was a huge brain drain”
  • Armenians were the other large Christian community. Hundreds of thousands were deported in 1915. They were either killed or died from starvation and disease. The label “genocide” is rejected by the Turkish state. From a population of two million Armenians, around 50,000 remain today
  • “Armenians fear expressing their religious identity here. Most of the believers hide their cross inside their shirt. They can’t open it and walk freely on the street because they could prompt a reaction”
  • New mosques are flourishing, while the world-famous Halki Orthodox theological school near Istanbul has remained closed since 1971 under Turkish nationalist pressure
  • “To be a Turk now means you have to be Muslim”
  • “The threatening feeling for non-Muslim minorities here is coming again.

It tells of a city where empires, cultures and religions collided. A building that bears mosaics of Jesus and the Virgin Mary beside calligraphy reading “Allah” and “the Prophet Mohamed”. There is no greater symbol of the clash of civilisations here than Hagia Sophia.

For almost 1,000 years it stood as the most important Orthodox cathedral in the world, the religious heart of the largely Christian Byzantine empire whose capital was then called Constantinople.

But in 1453 the city fell to the Ottomans, Hagia Sophia became a mosque and Christianity began its slow demise here.

As Turkey grew out of the ashes of the Ottoman Empire, that decline accelerated. When Pope Francis arrives here this week, he will visit a country whose population has fallen from 20% Christian 100 years ago to around 0.2% today.

‘Huge brain drain’

“No country in the region – including Iran – is as homogenous in terms of Islam as Turkey,” says historian Cengiz Aktar. “It’s a mono-colour country – it’s a Muslim country.”

After the Turkish Republic was born in 1923, it carried out a “population exchange” with Greece to create more ethnic and religious consistency. More than a million Greeks were forced out of Turkey to Greece while around 300,000 Muslims from Greece were relocated here.

The Greeks of Istanbul were initially saved but after a crippling wealth tax, anti-Greek pogroms in 1955 and mass expulsions in 1964, the Greek community was left in tatters. And so was the Orthodox Christianity they practised.

“The ethnic cleansing of these non-Muslim minorities was a huge brain drain,” says Mr Aktar, who has created a new exhibition on the loss of the Greeks here.

“It also meant the disappearance of the bourgeoisie because not only were they wealthy but they were artisans. Istanbul lost its entire Christian and Jewish heritage.”

Hidden crosses

It was not just the exodus of the Greeks that hit Christianity here.

Armenians were the other large Christian community. Hundreds of thousands were deported in 1915. They were either killed or died from starvation and disease. The label “genocide” is rejected by the Turkish state. From a population of two million Armenians, around 50,000 remain today.

Robert Koptas shows me around the office of his Armenian weekly newspaper, Agos. In 2007, the editor, Hrant Dink, was murdered outside by Turkish nationalists. Seven years on, Mr Koptas says the small Armenian community feels intimidated.

“Armenians fear expressing their religious identity here,” he says.

“Most of the believers hide their cross inside their shirt. They can’t open it and walk freely on the street because they could prompt a reaction. I don’t want to say all the Turkish population is against Christianity but nationalism is so high that people are afraid to express themselves.”

That is now the worry among the Christian minority here: that Turkish Muslim nationalism has grown under the Islamist-rooted government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, prime minister for 11 years before being elected president last August.

Dead missionaries

Mr Erdogan has made moves to support the Christians, such as passing a law to return confiscated state property to them and allowing Christian religious classes in schools. But he constantly stresses his Islamic identity, his support base is conservative Muslim and he whips up the nationalists here, the mood hardening against Christians.

Catholics, the smallest Christian minority in Turkey, have felt the impact.

A spate of murders of Catholic missionaries and priests a few years ago left the community in shock. At the Catholic basilica in Istanbul, there is Mass for the few.

“To be a Turk now means you have to be Muslim,” says Father Iulian Pista, who serves here.

“In the past, being a pious Muslim was looked down upon. Now Friday prayers are encouraged. Society here is becoming Islamised. Recently, I’ve seen youngsters defecate and urinate in my church. They shout ‘Allahu akbar’ [English: God is great]. I also believe God is great but the way they say it is threatening.”

Islam was sidelined from the constitutionally secular Turkish republic founded in 1923. But as a nation state was formed here, the religion became part of Turkish national identity, something that has sharply accelerated under Mr Erdogan’s leadership.

Old fears

New mosques are flourishing, while the world-famous Halki Orthodox theological school near Istanbul has remained closed since 1971 under Turkish nationalist pressure. One of the remaining Greeks of Turkey, Fotis Benlisoy, says the community feels squeezed: “The threatening feeling for non-Muslim minorities here is coming again.

“There are many reasons: language and policies of the government, the president and prime minister using more conservative references to Sunni identity, pejorative words for non-Muslim communities coming from members of the cabinet, so much circulating about Turkey’s relations with Isis [the Islamic State militant group based in Syria and Iraq] – all of this is making us think we might need an escape strategy.”

At the magnificent Panaghia Greek Orthodox Church in Istanbul, the morning liturgy is led by Bartholomew I, “ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople”, a position still based here.

It is a reminder of this country’s heritage – and of a Christian faithful that is small but defiant. As modern Turkey builds its identity, the question still remains: can it embrace true religious freedom – or will nationalism stand in the way?

Source

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