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Posts Tagged ‘African Refugees’

Eritrean Refugee: “It’s Better to Die in the Sea Than to Stay in Libya”

Posted by addisethiopia on July 10, 2017

Migrants Are Being Sold At Open Slave Markets In Libya

  • It is better to die than stay in Libya:’ Libya’s Slave Markets Remind Us of Flaws in EU Migration Plans
  • Migrants from West Africa are being openly traded in “public slave markets” across Libya.

I was horrified when I read the International Organization for Migration (IOM) report last week on sub-Saharan Africans being sold and bought in open markets in Libya—but I was not surprised.

During a recent visit to Italy, I spoke with dozens of men and women from East and West Africa who recently arrived in Sicily from Libya. They recounted extreme acts of cruelty at the hands of human smugglers, members of the Libyan coastguard, state-run detention center workers and locals.

I was sold twice,” a young man from Guinea told me on the tiny island of Lampedusa, just days after he arrived by boat from Libya. “I was sold to an Arab man who forced me to work and told me to call my family so they would send money. He sold me to another Arab man who forced me to work for him, too.” The young man was only able to leave once his family sent enough money to free him.

Read more: African migrants smuggled into Libya are being sold at ‘modern-day slave markets’

The slave trade affects women, too. A young woman from Nigeria told me: “As a female, you can’t walk alone in the street. Even if they don’t shoot you, [if] you’re black, they’ll just take you and sell you.” One man, also from Guinea, said that women are more expensive to buy than men.

Women also face shocking levels of sexual abuse. A United Nations official told me that of the migrants and asylum seekers in Libya, “almost every woman” has been sexually abused.

In this context, it is astounding that the European Union is working hard to keep people off its shores, even if it means leaving them in Libya. As outlined in a declaration in Malta in February, EU heads of state have promised to train and equip the Libyan coastguard and are hoping to “ensure [there are] adequate reception capacities and conditions in Libya for migrants.”

With summer weather approaching—bringing better conditions for crossing the Mediterranean—the EU and its member states are working with a sense of urgency that is palpable.

Training the Libyan coastguard is a welcome move if it contributes to saving lives and treating those rescued with humanity and respect. But the question of what happens after they are rescued is key: People are currently taken to detention centers where they are held in inhuman conditions.

Describing such centers, asylum seekers and migrants told me they had been beaten and forced to ask their relatives for money, that sometimes those who could not pay were shot, and that they were hardly fed at all. In addition, the collusion between smugglers and people running some detention centres is no secret.

Absent from the EU plan is what happens to people who fled their homes because of violence or persecution. Many of those arriving in Italy via Libya are in this category, among them Eritreans, Somalis, Sudanese, and people fleeing other countries because it is unsafe for them, often because of their political activities or sexual orientation.

The EU is focused on increasing the number of people returning from Libya to their country of origin, but there does not seem to be any consideration for those who cannot do so safely.

Despite the ongoing chaos and violence in Libya there is an absence—with very few exceptions—of international staff, including those from the EU, the U.N., and humanitarian organizations on the ground. As such, the idea that the situation for migrants and asylum seekers will dramatically improve in the coming months is utterly unrealistic.

One Eritrean man told me that “it’s better to die in the sea than to stay in Libya.” Smugglers had chained him to the ground by the ankles for three days when he was unable to pay the money they demanded. It is little surprise that for people like him, risking their lives crossing the Mediterranean seems like the only option.

Source

Islam’s Never-Ending Wars in Africa

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Faith | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

So Much Disdain For People of African Origin

Posted by addisethiopia on October 12, 2016

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Two days ago, the DailyMail  reported on an Eritrean refugee who was killed (R.I.P) in a car accident at Calais, France.

Upon visiting the comments section I was asking again and again, why do these folks, the media and the authorities have so much hatred for Africans? Why are they so obsessed with portraying a handful of African emigrants in a bad light? Why are they treating them with such disdain? Actually, it’s Arab Muslims who are terrorizing and angering them, not African Christians!

Please read the comments section and compare the BEST RATED with the WORST RATED. No sympathy for the dead Eritrean….unbelievable! It is somehow comparable to the actions of the Italians who built a memorial to a Fascist military leader who massacred 30,000 Christian Ethiopians during World War II.

BEST RATED (Green arrowed)

Possibly a Syrian, or an Arab snake who wrote this one:

We don’t want them. Our moral duty is to Syrian orphans. Not economic migrants trying to get here via their kids.

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WORST RATED (Red arrowed)

2016-10-11_081401 2016-10-11_081322 2016-10-11_081220 2016-10-11_081150

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Media & Journalism | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Refugee Crisis: Christians & Africans Notice This

Posted by addisethiopia on August 26, 2016

Christians, Africans, the West owes you so much more than they owe Arabs and Muslims…yet…

Compare the following sad stories:

AfricanRefugees3

With these ones:

SyrianRefugeesPope2

As Europe Begins to Welcome Syrians, African Refugees Fear Being Left Behind

TIME Magazine, Sept. 12, 2015

DestructionOfTheWorldThere is growing concern that Europe may unwittingly divide migrants into two distinct classes.

With E.U. leaders finally working on a Europe-wide refugee policy, there is growing concern among some migrants and aid officials that the new policies might unwittingly divide the migrants into two distinct classes—with two different kinds of welcomes.

First, the hundreds of thousands of Syrians fleeing the war back home, whose stunning flight into Europe has seized world attention; and second, the hundreds of thousands of much poorer, less educated newcomers who have also fled dire circumstances in Africa.

As EU officials prepare to meet in Brussels on Monday to hash out an emergency plan, the details are sketchy as to how the continent will integrate the massive influx of migrants who have crossed into Europe from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. On Wednesday the European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker made it clear to the EU Parliament that the union’s 28 countries were duty-bound to help host the 160,000 asylum-seekers currently stuck in Greece, Italy, and Hungary, and emphasized that all would be treated equally. “Europe has made the mistake in the past of distinguishing between Jews, Christians, Muslims,” he said. “There is no religion, no belief, no philosophy when it comes to refugees.”

Yet, for some of the 80,000 or so who have landed in Sicily this year—the vast majority African—the promise of fairness for all sounds unconvincing.

Africans who have fled deadly, often forgotten conflicts, or various kinds of persecution—including religious and anti-gay violence—say they believe it could take years to win refugee status or residence in Europe, if they ever receive it at all. Those simply fleeing poverty, and there are many, are not eligible for asylum.

Instead, many predict a long, tough road towards acceptance and employment somewhere on the continent. Several African asylum-seekers in Sicily described overwhelming bureaucratic hurdles towards those goals — a far different picture than the tens of thousands of Syrians whom the E.U. and U.S. now appear willing to host.

Yet both sets of newcomers share one experience: life-threatening journeys to Europe. “”We risked everything to cross the Mediterranean,” says Samate, a tall 17-year-old from Senegal, sitting in a detention center in the Sicilian town of Messina on Wednesday. He said he fled his home last February after separatist rebels in the disputed Casamance region where he comes from tried to draft him into battle. The Italian Coast Guard rescued him and other migrants as they tried to cross the Mediterranean on in late July, and brought them to Sicily.

About half of those who have landed on Europe’s shores this year have been Syrian, according to the U.N. refugee agency, most crossing from Turkey to Greece, before moving quickly on to Austria, Germany and Sweden. But a large portion of the rest are Africans who have crossed from Libya to Italy—a more lethal sea route that has so far killed more than 2,200 migrants this year. Most have arrived after hair-raising treks across the vast, searing Sahara, and then weeks in Libya’s migrant jails. Samate’s five-month journey included working for traffickers in Niger and Libya at meager wages.

Far different from the Syrians clambering off boats in Greece, the Africans land in Sicily penniless and empty-handed. When I ask to see what they carried with them, most look puzzled, then point to the clothes on their back. “I arrived with nothing, not even my documents,” said Mandjo, 16, from Guinea, who fled when religious violence destroyed his village. What little he grabbed as he fled was lost to bandits along the way.

Now, the plight of African refugees like Mandjo risks getting lost amid the Syrian refugee crisis in Europe, aid officials say. “It’s important to us that Europe is now beginning to talk about opening their borders and welcoming refugees,” says Giovanna Di Benedetto of Save the Children in Sicily. “But it is not only Syrians who have to be welcomed.”

To underscore her point, Di Benedetto whips out her iPhone to show me photos of dead African infants whose bodies washed ashore on a beach off Zuwara, Libya on August 28, when their smugglers’ boat capsized. About 200 people drowned when the ship overturned.

Five days later, a photo on a beach off Bodrum, Turkey showed another dead toddler: Aylan Kurdi, a three-year-old Syrian boy. That image finally jolted EU leaders into action. “Syrians of course need help, but they are not the only ones,” Di Benedetto says. Shaking her head at the photos of dead African children on her phone, she says she wonders whether Aylan’s “white skin” made the difference.

On Wednesday, Juncker, the European Commission President, announced a new €1.8-billion fund for Africa that will be financed from the EU’s operating budget. The fund is meant to address “root causes of illegal migration in Africa,” and Juncker expects individual European countries to “pitch in” with more money to effectively persuade Africans to stay at home, rather than move to Europe. He said the money would help generate jobs in Africa, thus reducing “destabilization, forced displacement and illegal migration.”

Such programs, sorely needed, could take generations to work, however. In the meantime, thousands of African migrants await settlement inside Europe’s borders.

How the EU will address this more immediate problem that problem is less clear than the issue of the new Syrian arrivals. “The EU is talking about the Syrians,” says Valeria Morace, an Italian working in the Messina center for unaccompanied minors. “But politicians don’t talk about Africans in general, because they are not really doing anything for them.”

Source

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Faith, Infos | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mediterranean: Africans Swimming in the Sea of Death

Posted by addisethiopia on July 11, 2012

They do this to Africans simply because they want and can!

While the world leaders express their heart-warm congratulations to Libyans on their “historic election” hundreds of Africans are dying in the Mediterranean sea – in the busiest seaway in the world — ignored by passing ships and planes, ignored by the world community.

Mind you, the duty to assist persons in distress at sea is a long-established rule of customary international law. The SAR and SOLAS Conventions were amended to impose for the first time an obligation on States to ‘cooperate and coordinate’ to ensure that ships’ masters are allowed to disembark rescued persons to a place of safety, irrespective of the nationality or status of those rescued, and with minimal disruption to the ship’s planned itinerary

There are a number of States, which are under the above-mentioned obligations. First, the coastal State, in whose SAR zone the vessel was in distress, was under an obligation to coordinate the search and rescue operation and to ensure that a ‘place of safety’ is provided for these persons. The exact limits between the SAR zone of Libya and Italy are not known to the author; however, both States are parties to LOSC, SOLAS and SAR Conventions and apparently they might incur responsibility for their omission to provide assistance to the vessel in distress

Well, they seem to prefer rescuing a stranded penguin to an African

As the so-called “Arab Spring” gave power to the Islamists and their surrogates, thousands of minorities have become the targets of ethnic cleansing throughout North Africa. Off the coast of North Africa, boatloads of people have been streaming out of North Africa, desperately fleeing across the Mediterranean to seek non-Muslim landing spots in Europe.

It is obvious that most of these refugees are blacks. Are they black Muslims? Are they black non-Muslims? Are they trying to flee racism and oppression in the ‘lands’ of the Muslim. It is very shameful, a tragedy that nobody seems to care enough to deal with these questions. These refugees pay thousands of dollars to the Arab ‘boat-dispatchers’ / traffickers to seat on those boats, and I am sure some of them could even afford to have cellphones or barometers to take them on board.

Despite that, at least 1 500 African refugees are known to have lost their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean in 2011

Europe haunted by fear of African refugees?

According to UNHCR report, an estimated 441,300 asylum claims were recorded in industrialized nations for the year 2011. The number of asylum claims received across all industrialized countries is still smaller than the population of Dadaab, a single refugee camp for Somali refugees in north-east Kenya. The Somali refugee population at Dollo Ado camps in Ethiopia exceeds 150.000, and the capital, Addis Abeba alone accommodates over 200.000 Somalis.

And the country with the highest number of asylum applications in the world is not a European, North American, or Australasian country, but South Africa (not covered by the report), which saw 107,000 claims between January and December 2011.

The world upside down

Peaceful, but desperate Africans who neither terrorize nor kill Europeans are used as scarecrows so that other Africans don’t attempt to come to Europe. Ungrateful, aggressive and murderous and Arabs and Afghans who scare and terrorize Westerners at will are fed with a silver spoon in their own countries, and invited to come to Europe in their thousands. The Fear-factor shaping the way of life rich nations? Or are they showing their powerlessness by killing the voiceless weak, while accommodating terrorists?

Just last week, major donors of the West have offered $16-billion in development aid for Afghanistan (please read the comments here)

The country of origin of the largest number of claimants was Afghanistan, with a 34 per cent increase over 2010 to 35,700. followed by Iraq (23,500).

54 Migrants Die of Thirst in Boat Tragedy off Tunisia

It is with great sadness that UNHCR received the news that 54 people perished attempting the sea journey from Libya to Italy. According to the sole survivor, an Eritrean man, 55 people boarded the boat in Libya in late June. He reported that all the other passengers died of dehydration during a 15 day ordeal.

“This is a tragedy,” said T. Alexander Aleinikoff, Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees. “Fifty four people have lost their lives.”

Fishermen found the survivor off the Tunisian coast last night. They alerted the Tunisian Coast Guard who rescued the man. He was immediately taken to Zarzis hospital where he is being treated for dehydration and exposure.

Continue reading…

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Posted in Ethiopia, Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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