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Posts Tagged ‘ሰላይ’

Nobel Peace Laureates Committed Gross Human Rights Violations & War Crimes in Ethiopia

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 29, 2020

Yes! Both War Criminals, Abiy Ahmed & Isias Afewerki are Nobel Peace Prize Laureates 2019!

በኢሳያስ አፈቆርኪ እንዲቃጠል የተደረገውን የትግራይ ሰብል ማሳ የሳተላይት ምስል የኒው ዮርክ ታይምስ አትሞታል። ዋይ! ዋይ! ዋይ! ቪዲዮውን እስከ መጨረሻው እንከታተለውና ነጥብጣቦቹን እናገናኛቸው።

ግራኝ አብዮት አህመድ እና ኢሳያስ አፈቆርኪ በኢትዮጵያ ላይ እየፈጸሙት ያሉት አሰቃቂ ተግባር፣ እየሠሩት ያሉት ወንጀል ከግራኝ አብህመድ ቀዳማዊና ከዮዲት ጉዲት ይከፋል። ሂትለርና ሙሶሊኒም ሆን ብለው እንኳን የራስን የወረሯቸውን ሃገራት የሰብል ማሳ ያቃጠሉ አይመስለኝም። እነዚህ አውሬዎች ከየት ተገኙ?

👉 ፋሺስቶቹ አብዮት አህመድ አሊ እና ኢሳያስ አፈቆርኪ ከአረብ ረዳቶቻቸው ጋር አብረውና፤

ኮሮናን ተገን አድርገው

አንበጣ መንጋን ተገን አድርገው

ዝናብና ብርድ የሚቆምበትን ወር ጠብቀው

የሰብል ምርት የሚሰበሰብበት የመኸር ወቅትን ጠብቀው

በአሜሪካ የፕሬዚደንት ምርጫ የሚደረግበትን ዕለትን ጠብቀው

ግራኝ አብዮት አህመድ ሚስቱን እና ልጆቹን ወደ አሜሪካ ከላካቸው በኋላ

በምስኪኑ የትግራይ ሕዝብ ላይ በፌስቡክ ጦርነት አወጁበት።

ለካስ ባለፈው ጥቅምት ወር ላይ “መከላከያ ሰራዊት የትግራይ አርሶ አደር የደረሱ ሰብል ማሳ አጨዳ እየተረባረበ ይገኛል” ሲሉን የድራማ ንግስቲቱ አብዮት አህመድ አሊ ለጭፍጨፋውና ቃጠሎው በዚህ መልክ እየተዘጋጀች ነበር። ይህ ቆሻሻ ሕዝቡን ምን ያህል ቢንቀውና ቢጠላው ነው?! ዋው! እነዚህ አውሬዎች እኮ ከዲያብሎስ የከፉ አረመኔዎች፣ ጨካኞችና እርኩሶች መሆናቸውን እያየን ነው።

ግራኝ አብዮት አህመድ እና ኢሳያስ አፈቆርኪ በኢትዮጵያ ላይ እየፈጸሙት ያሉት አሰቃቂ ተግባር፣ እየሠሩት ያሉት ወንጀል ከግራኝ አብህመድ ቀዳማዊና ከዮዲት ጉዲት ይከፋል። ልዩነቱ በዚያ ዘመን ደጋፊዎቻቸው መሀመዳውያን፣ ቱርኮችና ጋሎች ነበሩ፤ ዛሬ ግን የጎንደር ጋላማራዎች ታክለውበታል። ሂትለርና ሙሶሊኒ እንኳን ሆን ብለው የራስን የወረሯቸውን ሃገራት የሰብል ማሳ ያቃጠሉ አይመስለኝም። እነዚህ አውሬዎች ከየት ተገኙ?

ልብ ብለናል? የእነ ደብረጽዮን፣ መለስ ዜናዊ፣ ቴዎድሮስ አድሃኖም ልጆችና ቤተሰቦች ከኢትዮጵያ አልወጡም፤ ግራኝ አብዮት አህመድ አሊ፣ ለማ መገርሳ እና አጋሮቻቸው ግን ሚስቶቻቸውንና ልጆቻቸውን ወደ አሜሪካ ልከዋል። እስኪ የዲያስፐራው የሰበር ዜና ጀግኖችበዚህ ጉዳይ ዙሪያ ይዘግቡልን!

Refugees Come Under Fire as Old Foes Fight in Concert in Ethiopia

Forces from neighboring Eritrea have joined the war in northern Ethiopia, and have rampaged through refugee camps committing human rights violations, officials and witnesses say.

As fighting raged across the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia last month, a group of soldiers arrived one day at Hitsats, a small hamlet ringed by scrubby hills that was home to a sprawling refugee camp of 25,000 people.

The refugees had come from Eritrea, whose border lies 30 miles away, part of a vast exodus in recent years led by desperate youth fleeing the tyrannical rule of their leader, one of Africa’s longest-ruling autocrats. In Ethiopia, Eritrea’s longtime adversary, they believed they were safe.

But the soldiers who burst into the camp on Nov. 19 were also Eritrean, witnesses said. Mayhem quickly followed — days of plunder, punishment and bloodshed that ended with dozens of refugees being singled out and forced back across the border into Eritrea.

For weeks, Prime Minister Abiiy Ahmed of Ethiopia has denied that soldiers from Eritrea — a country that Ethiopia once fought in an exceptionally brutal war — had entered Tigray, where Mr. Abiiy has been fighting since early November to oust rebellious local leaders.

In fact, according to interviews with two dozen aid workers, refugees, United Nations officials and diplomats — including a senior American official — Eritrean soldiers are fighting in Tigray, apparently in coordination with Mr. Abiiy’s forces, and face credible accusations of atrocities against civilians. Among their targets were refugees who had fled Eritrea and its harsh leader, President Isaias Afwerki.

The deployment of Eritreans to Tigray is the newest element in a melee that has greatly tarnished Mr. Abiiy’s once-glowing reputation. Only last year he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for making peace with Mr. Isaias. Now it looks like the much-lauded peace deal between the former enemies in fact laid the groundwork for them to make war against Tigray, their mutual adversary.

Abiiy has invited a foreign country to fight against his own people,” said Awol Allo, a former Abiiy supporter turned outspoken critic who lectures in law at Keele University in Britain. “The implications are huge.”

Mr. Abiiy insists he was forced to move his army quickly in Tigray after the region’s leaders, who had dominated Ethiopia for 27 years until Mr. Abiiy took over in 2018, mutinied against his government. But in the early weeks of the fight, Ethiopian forces were aided by artillery fired by Eritrean forces from their side of the border, an American official said.

Since then, Mr. Abiiy’s campaign has been led by a hodgepodge of forces, including federal troops, ethnic militias and, evidently, soldiers from Eritrea.

At Hitsats, Eritrean soldiers initially clashed with local Tigrayan militiamen in battles that rolled across the camp. Scores of people were killed, including four Ethiopians employed by the International Rescue Committee and the Danish Refugee Council, aid workers said.

The chaos deepened in the days that followed, when Eritrean soldiers looted aid supplies, stole vehicles and set fire to fields filled with crops and a nearby forested area used by refugees to collect wood, aid workers said. The camp’s main water tank was riddled with gunfire and emptied.

Their accounts are supported by satellite images, obtained and analyzed by The New York Times, that show large patches of newly scorched earth in and around the Hitsats camp after the Eritrean forces swept through.

Later, soldiers singled out several refugees — camp leaders, by some accounts — bundled them into vehicles and sent them back across the border to Eritrea.

She’s crying, crying,” said Berhan Okbasenbet, an Eritrean now in Sweden whose sister was driven from Hitsats to Keren, the second-largest city in Eritrea, alongside a son who was shot in the fighting. “It’s not safe for them in Eritrea. It’s not a free country.”

Ms. Berhan asked not to publish their names, fearing reprisals, but provided identifying details that The New York Times verified with an Ethiopian government database of refugees.

Mr. Abiiy’s spokeswoman did not respond to questions for this article. However, a few weeks ago the United Nations secretary general, António Guterres, bluntly asked Mr. Abiiy if Eritrean troops were fighting in his war. “He guaranteed to me that they have not entered Tigrayan territory,” Mr. Guterres told reporters on Dec. 9.

Those denials have been met with incredulity from Western and United Nations officials.

The Trump administration has demanded that all Eritrean troops immediately leave Tigray, a United States official said, citing reports of widespread looting, killings and other potential war crimes.

It remains unclear how many Eritreans are in Tigray, or precisely where, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss delicate diplomacy. A communications blackout over Tigray since Nov. 4 has effectively shielded the war from outside view.

But that veil has slowly lifted in recent weeks, as witnesses fleeing Tigray or reaching telephones have begun to give accounts of the fighting, the toll on civilians and pervasive presence of Eritrean soldiers.

In interviews, some described fighters with Eritrean accents and wearing Ethiopian uniforms. Others said they witnessed televisions and refrigerators being looted from homes and businesses. A European official, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss confidential findings, said some of those stolen goods were being openly sold in the Eritrean capital, Asmara.

Three sources, including a different Western official, said they had received reports of an Eritrean attack on a church in Dinglet, in eastern Tigray, on Nov. 30. By one account, 35 people whose names were provided were killed.

The reports of Eritrean soldiers sweeping through Tigray are especially jarring to many Ethiopians.

Ethiopia and Eritrea were once the best of enemies, fighting a devastating border war in the late 1990s that cost 100,000 lives. Although the two countries are now officially at peace, many Ethiopians are shocked that the old enemy is roaming freely inside their borders.

How did we let a state that is hostile to our country come in, cross the border and brutalize our own people?” said Tsedale Lemma, editor in chief of the Addis Standard newspaper. “This is an epic humiliation for Ethiopia’s pride as a sovereign state.”

Mr. Abiiy has already declared victory in Tigray and claimed, implausibly, that no civilians have died. But last week his government offered a $260,000 reward for help in capturing fugitive leaders from the regional governing party, the Tigray Peoples Liberation Front — a tacit admission that Mr. Abiiy has failed to achieve a major stated goal of his campaign.

In fact, the biggest winner so far may be his Eritrean ally, Mr. Isaias.

Since coming to power in 1993, Mr. Isaias has won a reputation as a ruthless and dictatorial figure who rules with steely determination at home and who meddles abroad to exert his influence.

For a time he supported the Islamist extremists of the Shabab in Somalia, drawing U.N. sanctions on Eritrea, before switching his loyalties to the oil-rich — and Islamist-hating — United Arab Emirates.

Inside Eritrea, Mr. Isaias enforced a harsh system of endless military service that fueled a tidal wave of migration that has driven over 500,000 Eritreans — perhaps one-tenth of the population — into exile.

The peace pact signed by the two leaders initially raised hopes for a new era of stability in the region. Ultimately, it amounted to little. By this summer, borders that opened briefly had closed again.

But Mr. Abiiy and Mr. Isaias remained close, bonded by their shared hostility toward the rulers of Tigray.

They had different reasons to distrust the Tigrayans. For Mr. Abiiy the Tigray People’s Liberation Front was a dangerous political rival — a party that had once led Ethiopia and, once he became prime minister, began to flout his authority openly.

For Mr. Isaias, though, it was a deeply personal feud — a story of grievances, bad blood and ideological disputes that stretched back to the 1970s, when Eritrea was fighting for independence from Ethiopia, and Mr. Isaias joined with the Tigray People’s Liberation Front to fight an Ethiopian Marxist dictator.

Those differences widened after 1991, when Eritrea became independent and the Tigrayans had come to power in Ethiopia, culminating in a devastating border war.

As tensions rose between Mr. Abiiy and the T.P.L.F., Mr. Isaias saw an opportunity to settle old scores and to reassert himself in the region, said Martin Plaut, author of “Understanding Eritrea” and a senior research fellow at the University of London.

It’s typical Isaias,” said Mr. Plaut. “He seeks to project power in ways that are completely unimaginable for the leader of such a small country.”

Aid groups warn that, without immediate access, Tigray will soon face a humanitarian disaster. The war erupted just as villagers were preparing to harvest their crops, in a region already grappling with swarms of locusts and recurring drought.

Refugees are especially vulnerable. According to the United Nations, 96,000 Eritrean refugees were in Tigray at the start of the fight, although some camps have since emptied. An internal U.N. report from Dec. 12, seen by The Times, described the situation at Hitsats as “extremely dire,” with no food or water.

Farther north at Shimelba camp, Eritrean soldiers beat refugees, tied their hands and left them under the sun all day, said Efrem, a resident who later fled to Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital.

They poured milk on their bodies so they would be swarmed with flies,” he said.

Later, Efrem said, the soldiers rounded up 40 refugees and forced them to travel back across the border, to Eritrea.

Source

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Infos, Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Shame on The BBC and Other Western Outlets Who are Silent in The Face of Huge Crimes in Ethiopia

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on December 28, 2020

BBC Glosses Ethiopia Horror

A feel-good headline on the BBC this week reads: “How a pariah and Nobel laureate became friends”. It was referring to the leaders of Eritrea and Ethiopia, as if their “friendship” was some kind of benign development to be lauded.

The feature article opens with: “In a sign of the changing political fortunes of a man who was once a pariah, Eritrea’s President Isaias Afwerki has proven to be a staunch ally of Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize winner and Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, giving his troops much-needed support to fight the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) in Tigray.”

The state-owned British broadcaster quotes the Ethiopian premier thanking Eritrea which “had fed, clothed and armed retreating Ethiopian soldiers when the TPLF first attacked them and seized their bases in Tigray, an Ethiopian region which borders Eritrea.” The BBC went on to note: “This was a significant acknowledgement by Mr Abiy, though he did not go as far as to admit claims that Mr Isaias, had also sent troops to help defeat the TPLF, a long-time foe of the Eritrean leader who has been in power since 1993.”

This is how the BBC and other Western media outlets are spinning cover for what is really going on in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray region. There is an ongoing aggression against the Tigray people by the Abiy regime which is referred to as the Ethiopian “government”. Abiy was never elected. He took power in early 2018 as part of a backroom political deal.

In his effort to crush the political opposition represented by the Tigray people and their political leadership, Abiy has enlisted the full military support of Eritrea to invade Tigray along with Abiy regime forces.

Eritrean military and paramilitaries are deep inside Tigray territory, killing civilians and looting the towns and villages with the collusion of the Ethiopian so-called Nobel laureate.

Abiy’s claims of launching a “law and order operation” to round up the Tigray “junta” which began on November is a sick joke. What was supposed to be a quick operation in the national interest has escalated into an ongoing guerrilla war which has seen millions of impoverished people turned into refugees internally and externally, with up to 45,000 fleeing to neighboring Sudan.

Sources in Tigray have confirmed the presence of Eritrean brigades – some even wearing Ethiopian national military garb – working alongside Abiy’s regime forces. Towns and villages have been shelled from Eritrea and hit by air strikes carried out by the Abiy regime.

UN human rights commissioner Michele Bachelet has condemned these massive violations, although she added that Tigray rebels have also perpetrated war crimes. The rebels have hit the Eritrean capital, Asmara, with rockets claiming retaliation.

The US State Department also stated that it had evidence of Eritrean forces deployed in Tigray region.

In the above BBC report it did refer to “unconfirmed claims” of atrocities carried out by Abiy regime and Eritrean forces.

Nevertheless, the main thrust of the BBC’s coverage has been to give more credibility to the version put out by the “Nobel-peace-prize-winning Prime Minister” Abiy Ahmed.

The reality is, however, that so-called laureate has ganged up with the Eritrean dictator to launch a war on the Tigray people. That’s what is really going on, yet the BBC would have us believe that these two de facto war criminals are “staunch allies” who have become unlikely “friends” as if it is a rosy story of political romance.

Since Abiy ascended to the premiership (and has postponed elections promised as part of his interim office), he has been waging a low-intensity war of aggression against the Tigray region. Electricity and water supply cuts over the past two years have worn the people down. Then he attempted a daring covert military operation on November 3 in collusion with Eritrean commandoes in the Tigray capital of Mekelle, according to local sources. The Tigray forces thwarted that offensive, which Abiy then fabricated as an unprovoked attack on the national army by “terrorists”.

The BBC and other Western media outlets have been dutifully spinning events in Ethiopia. Two years of hostility towards Tigray by the unelected Abiy regime has been spun as “reforms” by a “pro-democracy” figure. Now when this same figure is waging a genocide aided and abetted by a foreign army from Eritrea, the BBC is endeavoring to tell us this is a sign of “friendship”.

Shame on the BBC and other Western outlets who are silent in the face of huge crimes. Evidently, their condemnations only happen when it is politically expedient to undermine a nation which is an official enemy of Western governments.

Source

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Posted in Conspiracies, Ethiopia, Infos | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Regime-Change Mission in Ethiopia by Nobel Peace Laureate | የግራኝ የሥርዓት ለውጥ ተልዕኮ

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on November 16, 2020

👉 “በኢትዮጵያ የሥርዓትለውጥ ተልዕኮ በኖቤል የሰላም ተሸላሚ

በዚህ ጽሑፍ የቀረቡ ዋና ዋና ነጥቦች፤

👉 Who is Abiy Ahmed?

+ አብይ አህመድ ማነው?

👉 Nobel Prize part of the PR Makeover

+ የኖቤል ሽልማት የህዝብ ግንኙነት ትርዒት ማሳያ አካል

👉 Regime Change

+ የአገዛዝ ለውጥ

👉 Dam Target

+ የሕዳሴው ግድብ ዒላማ

👉 Tigray Subjugation the Final Mission

+ የመጨረሻ ተልእኮ፤ ትግራይን ማንበርከክ

“For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest; neither any thing hid, that shall not be known and come abroad.”

“It’s like an empire crumbling before our eyes,” is how one diplomat observing the crisis in Ethiopia was quoted as saying. There is no doubt that the historically important nation is facing a momentous threat to its existence.

After two years as prime minister Abiy Ahmed has overseen the collapse of a once strong and independent country, the only nation in Africa never to have been colonized by foreign powers.

The latest eruption of violence is centered on the northwest Tigray region which borders Eritrea and Sudan. Abiy has sent troops and warplanes to bring the oppositional stronghold under the control of the central government in Addis Ababa. Despite claims echoed by the state-run media that federal troops have succeeded in gaining control, the region remains defiant. Hundreds are reported dead from battles. But it is hard to confirm because the region has been cut off by the Abiy regime.

Incongruously, the prime minister who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2019 has rebuffed appeals from the United Nations to enter into negotiations with the Tigray leadership to avoid further bloodshed. There are fears that the military confrontation could lead to all-out civil war in Africa’s second most populous nation, dragging in neighboring countries in the unstable and poverty-stricken Horn of Africa.

👉 Who is Abiy Ahmed?

The 44-year-old politician is currently the youngest African leader. He came to power in Ethiopia in April 2018 after much opaque political wrangling within a shaky coalition government. Abiy’s tenure was initially meant to be as caretake premier who would oversee elections. However, more than two years later he has postponed elections indefinitely under the pretext of safeguarding public health from the coronavirus pandemic. The Tigray region is dominated by the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) which was formerly the ruling faction following a revolutionary war that ended in 1991. The TPLF were always wary of a hidden agenda behind Abiy. It refused to postpone elections in September and they claim that Abiy is now ruling like a dictator without a mandate.

Abiy was formerly a member of the TPLF-led coalition regime, serving as a minister of technology and before that as a military intelligence officer. While studying for his MBA at the private Ashland university in Ohio (see notable alumni), it is believed that he was recruited by the CIA. His later work as a government minister establishing national security surveillance systems under the tutelage of U.S. spy agencies would have given him immense political powers and leverage over rivals.

👉 Nobel Prize part of the PR Makeover

Abiy was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2019 after almost one year in office as caretaker premier owing to a surprise initiative he embarked on with Eritrean dictator Isaias Afwerki. Controversially, Abiy refused to give press conferences to answer questions on the basis for his award. The settlement was supposed to put at end to a two-decade border dispute between Ethiopia and Eritrea following a three-year bloody war that ended in 2001. As a result, Abiy was generally hailed as a progressive reformer by Western media. The notable thing is, however, the purported peace deal did not deliver any practical improvement in cross-border relations between Eritrea and Tigray, the adjacent Ethiopian region. All of Abiy’s visits to the Eritrean capital Asmara have been shrouded in secrecy. No peace plan was ever published. And, crucially, Tigray people were not consulted on the deal-making undertaken by Abiy who comes from the Oromo region straddling central Ethiopia.

👉 Regime Change

While Abiy was apparently seeking peace outside his nation, the picture inside was very different. As soon as he took power in early 2018, Ethiopia’s tapestry of multiethnic population of nearly 110 million dramatically unravelled from a surge in internecine violence and massive displacement. Prior to that, the federal structure of Ethiopia under the TPLF-led regime (1991-2018) had been relatively stable and peaceful. During those decades, while the socialist orientated authorities maintained close relations with the United States in terms of regional security matters, Ethiopia also pursued nationally independent policies in terms of economic development. Western finance capital was heavily regulated, while China became the main foreign investment partner involved in key infrastructure projects.

A major project is the Blue Nile hydroelectric dam which was inaugurated by the former TPLF prime minister Meles Zenawi who died in 2012. Set to become the biggest power plant in Africa, it was largely self-financed by Ethiopia. Western capital didn’t get a look in.

👉 Dam Target

Nearly three months after Abiy’s catapult to power, the chief engineer of the Blue Nile dam Simegnew Bekele was murdered in what appeared to be an assassination. An investigation by the authorities later claimed it was suicide. Few people believe that from the suspicious circumstances, such as security cameras inexplicably failing and his security detail having been abruptly switched just before his killing. His wife was prevented from returning from abroad to attend the funeral.

The motive for the murder of the chief engineer was to throw the dam’s construction into disarray. The point was not stop its construction but to overhaul the financing of the project with the breakthrough input of Western capital to cover the $5 billion mega-dam.

👉 Tigray Subjugation the Final Mission

Over the past two years, the entire federal nation of Ethiopia has been rocked by sectarian clashes. It is impossible to put an exact number on the death toll but it is estimated to be in the thousands. Political assassinations have become all too common whereas before Abiy’s ascent to office such violence was rare. It appears the deadly strife has stemmed from Abiy and his clique systematically replacing the political administrations in the constituent nine regional governments of Ethiopia. He has also sacked lawmakers in the central parliament in Addis Ababa, replacing them with his own flunkies. All the while the Western media have portrayed the moves as “democratic reforms” carried out by the Nobel laureate prime minister. Violence among the various constituent nations of Ethiopia, it is implied by Western media, is the result of revanchist old regime elements instead of being legitimate resistance to Abiy’s power grab.

The Tigray region has always had strong political and military autonomy. Its five million population is unified behind the TPLF leadership. Thus the northwest region represents an obstacle to the regime-change operation in Ethiopia being carried out by Abiy Ahmed and his foreign backers. Those foreign backers include the United States and Gulf Arab oil regimes who are seeking geopolitical control over the strategic Horn of Africa. For that regime change to succeed, Ethiopia’s political independence must be broken. And in particular the national resistance of the Tigray region must be vanquished.

It is sinister indeed that last weekend while Abiy was launching federal forces on Tigray and cutting off transport, electricity and communications, he flew to visit his Eritrean dictator friend, according to Tigray sources. There are deep concerns that the two politicians are forging a pincer movement to attack Tigray from the south and north on the back of a criminal siege strangling the region.

👉 HOW THE NSA BUILT A SECRET SURVEILLANCE NETWORK FOR ETHIOPIA

Amid concerns about Ethiopia’s human rights abuses, the NSA forged a secret relationship with the country that expanded exponentially over the years.

https://theintercept.com/2017/09/13/nsa-ethiopia-surveillance-human-rights/

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