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Was Barack Obama The First African-American, or The First Muslim President of America?

Posted by addisethiopia on October 18, 2016

According to me, Barack loves Hussein more than he does Obama, — and he is the first Muslim president of the US of A.

FIRST REASON: IMMIGRATION: Barack Hussein essentially rewarded Muslims for 9-11, 2001 by waging the stealth Jihad of Islamic immigration (Hijira). And, the Hilldabeast (they will certainly make the next president from whatever is left of her) will double U.S. population with Muslim immigrants. Look at the table; not a single African / Ethiopian language is represented there. What a shame!

RECORD 64.7 MILLION NON-ENGLISH SPEAKERS IN U.S.

Nearly 65 Million U.S. Residents Spoke a Foreign Language at Home in 2015

camarota-language-16-t2Up 5.2 million since 2010 and up 1.5 million since 2014

Doubles since 1990, with Arabic fastest growing

Newly released Census Bureau data shows that a record 64.7 million U.S. residents five years of age and older spoke a language other than English at home in 2015. The number is up 5.2 million since 2010 and increased by 1.5 million in just the last year.

The largest percentage increases from 2010 to 2015 were for speakers of Arabic, Hindi (an Indian language), and Urdu (Pakistan’s national language). As a share of the population, more than one in five U.S. residents now speaks a foreign language at home.

Among the findings:

  • In 2015, a record 64.7 million U.S. residents (native-born, legal immigrants, and illegal immigrants) age five and older spoke a language other than English at home. The number has more than doubled since 1990, when 31.8 million spoke a language other than English.

  • Taking a longer view, the 64.7 million foreign-language speakers in 2015 is almost triple the number in 1980.

  • As a share of the population, 21.5 percent of U.S. residents speak a foreign language at home — nearly double the 11 percent in 1980.

  • The largest percentage increases from 2010 to 2015 were among speakers of Arabic (up 34 percent), Hindi (up 33 percent), Urdu (up 24 percent), Chinese (up 19 percent), French Creole (up 16 percent), Gujarati (up 14 percent), and Persian (up 13 percent). Hindi and Gujarati are languages of India; Urdu is spoken in Pakistan; French Creole is spoken in Haiti; and Persian is the national language of Iran.

  • The largest numerical increases from 2010 to 2015 were among speakers of Spanish (up 3.1 million), Chinese (up 525,000), Arabic (up 292,000), Hindi (up 203,000), Tagalog (up 163,000), French Creole (up 117,000), and Urdu (up 92,000). Tagalog is spoken in the Philippines.

  • Languages with more than a million speakers in the United States in 2015 were: Spanish (40 million), Chinese (3.3 million), Tagalog (1.7 million), Vietnamese (1.5 million), French (1.3 million), Arabic (1.2 million), and Korean (1.1 million).

  • Although all the data has not been released for 2015, what has been released indicates that nearly one in four public school students now speaks a language other than English at home.

  • Many of those who speak a foreign language at home are not immigrants. In fact, half of the growth in foreign-language speakers since 2010 is among those born in the United States. Overall, 44 percent (28.5 million) of those who speak a language other than English at home are U.S.-born.

  • Of those who speak a foreign language at home, 26 million (40 percent) told the Census Bureau that they speak English less than very well. This figure is entirely based on the opinions of the respondents; the Census Bureaus does not directly measure language skills.

  • States with the largest share of their populations speaking a foreign language at home in 2015 were: California (45 percent), Texas (35 percent), New Mexico (34 percent), New York (31 percent), New Jersey (31 percent), Nevada (30 percent), Florida (29 percent), Arizona (27 percent), Hawaii (26 percent), Illinois (23 percent), and Massachusetts (23 percent).

  • States with the largest percentage increases in the number of foreign-language speakers from 2010 to 2015 were: North Dakota (up 30 percent); Wyoming (up 24 percent); Maryland (up 17 percent); West Virginia (up 16 percent); Oklahoma and Delaware (both up 15 percent); Florida, Nevada, and Utah (each up 14 percent); and Georgia, Minnesota, and Kentucky (each up 13 percent).

  • States with the largest percentage increases in foreign-language speakers from 1980 to 2015 were: Nevada (up 1,005 percent), Georgia (up 916 percent), North Carolina (up 729 percent), Virginia (up 460 percent), Tennessee (up 414 percent), Arkansas (up 408 percent), Washington (up 386 percent), Florida (up 356 percent), South Carolina (up 339 percent), Oregon (up 336 percent), and Maryland (up 335 percent).

Source

obcafe

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