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Archive for October 10th, 2008

Ethiopian For CNN Heroes

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

Founder of “Ethiopia Reads” Yohannes Gebregeorgis is among CNN’s Top 10 Heroes.

Congratulations to the great man!

Let’s join Ato Yohannes at the following address:

http://heroes.cnn.com/default.asp

Posted in Ethiopia, Infos | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Forest Whitaker Is Louis Armstrong

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

Forest Whitaker to Star as Louis Armstrong in Major Film

A forthcoming Louis Armstrong biopic will star Forest Whitaker as the revered Satchmo. Whitaker will also direct the film, titled What a Wonderful World after one of Armstrong’s most popular songs. The film is the first major motion picture biography of Armstrong to be authorized by his estate. Now, this sounds better than “Idi Amin”

Continue Reading…

Posted in Infotainment | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Plight Of African Boat People

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

Just a couple of hours ago, migrant vessel sinks off Morocco carrying North African migrants. And, on the other side of Africa, about 100 migrants are feared to have drowned after being thrown overboard by smugglers in the Gulf of Aden, the UN refugee agency says. During the past 5 to 10 years alone, many thousand Africans have been thrown off ships and were given to Sharks as food. Those who made it to their anticipated destination suffer inhuman treatment and abuse. This situation is far worse than those Africans who were taken as slaves by European and Arab nations hundred of years ago. The most tragic part of the story is that no one is doing something about it.

Continue Reading…

Posted in Ethiopia | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

The Dream World

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

Most people are other people,” Oscar Wilde once remarked. “Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.” As he so wryly observed, the vast majority of us are not who we’ve been pretending to be, and the lives we’ve been living until now are molded according to rules and values that are not our own. Most of humanity is stuck in someone else’s discarded chewing gum and has yet to break free.

Unless you have been brave enough to forsake this trap, here is your likely portrait: your religious convictions are those of your parents or community; you root for your hometown sports teams; your political allegiances conform to the party system that society offers; you are an avid observer of the cultural pageantry, like the Super Bowl and the Oscars; your holidays are the standard ones, such as Christmas, New Year’s Eve, and Independence Day; you look to your political and religious leaders for guidance and protection; you feel driven to succeed—to make more money, to live a better life.

These are worthy and desirable choices that hold families and societies together. They make you who you are, you might argue. True, but only if you are content with admiring the wrapping and never looking inside the box. If you dared to look, you’d discover how these basic thoughts originate in a fundamental belief formed during the first years of your life: that survival depends on obeying the rules. Children typically bend their perceptions and interpretations of reality to match those of their parents and others who care for them. They find clever ways to please in order to receive attention and belong. As they grow up, the people and issues may change over time, but the initial patterns of conformity remain deeply ingrained in the subconscious.

The price for surrendering to consensus is steep. It is nothing less than the loss of individuality and curiosity. Without these two magnificent attributes, you disengage from the grandness of the creation and implode into the holographic illusion humans have come to call reality. You become one of Oscar Wilde’s other people, thinking someone else’s opinions and assuming they are your own.

We are trapped in the daily drama the culture and the media feed us: mortgages, sporting events, tsunamis, sex offenders, AIDS, terrorism, global warming, corrupt governments, and economic inequities . . . all demanding our attention. The matrix plays us like an instrument. A thirty-second news bite can push our buttons. We get hooked and riled, liberally lacing our collective guts with corrosive biochemicals unleashed by our righteous indignation.

This condition is virtually universal. It is also the underlying cause of the world as we know it. People cling so tightly to their personal and social identities that they are blinded to anything that does not validate them. The inevitable product is a world of war, greed, and competition, driven by paranoia and fear.

The way out is easier than anyone might imagine. However, very few summon the courage, for it requires them to leave the comfort of their known world and walk alone, unaided by the crutch of belief and dogma, into the domain of pure consciousness. Most people would rather get caught up in the business of earning a living, raising a family, or helping their community than deal with the unsettling immensity of All That Is.

Yet it seems that all humans are meant to take this epic journey of discovery at some point in their series of lives on this planet. If you choose to walk this path, you will find yourself gaining a new perspective—that of consciousness, where the mind, with its judgments and emotions, ceases to dominate and the heart is your only reliable guide. The great issues of your daily life that once commanded your attention now seem wondrously arbitrary and irrelevant—simply interesting experiences that lasted far too long and became unnecessarily weighty.

You now see the illusion for what it is: a game-board projection designed so aspects of the Oneness can experience duality, fear, and separation. It is no more real than a programmed matrix in a computer game. You and I are merely units of awareness projected into the matrix, defining ourselves by the points through which we view and believing what we see to be reality. Who did the projecting? You. Who is the projection? You. There is only you.

How do you get to this liberating place from which you can see the larger picture?

The cosmic formula of creation is gloriously simple: Attention + Intention = Manifestation. Nothing in the universe evades this law. The reality you perceive is entirely a function of the only two forces at your command: your attention and your intention. Bring conscious awareness to this equation—consciously monitor your attention and intention and what you are manifesting—and everything changes.

Through this ongoing process of self-observation it will become increasingly clear that the part of you that is projected into the illusion is in trouble. This realization in fact marks the beginning of your journey out of the illusion. Once you begin to couple the law of Attention + Intention = Manifestation with the concept of Oneness, you begin to see a completely different picture. You are All That Is. There is nowhere for you to go, nothing to attain, no lessons to learn.

If you buy into the reality that you are an earthbound human stuck in the struggle of life, presto, there you are. If you focus on the part of you that is watching you flounder in the illusion, snap, you’re free. It cant get much easier than that. Yet why are so few of us awake?

The written or spoken word can do no more than point the way. And trading one belief system for another accomplishes nothing. The answer lies elsewhere. Waking up is a consequence of induction. Just a few years ago you might have placed yourself in the presence of a guru or master and, through devotion, discipline, or some other practice, gradually assumed some of his or her enlightenment. Now, using the law of A + I = M, you become your own master. By focusing your attention on the part of you that is watching the rest of you floundering in the illusion, you are taking a giant step in restoring control over how your attention is commanded. If you add the intention of reclaiming your essence, you complete the formula that can only result in the manifestation of whatever your curiosity seeks to explore.

The payoff of having been so deeply mired in the illusion that you nearly succumbed is compassion for those still stuck in the matrix, coupled with a large dose of humility. You have learned that the illusion is perfect exactly as it is. The only thing that needs to change is the point from which we view it. Now all that’s left is for you to summon the courage to begin the journey home.

Posted in Curiosity, Ethiopia | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Seeing Race And Seeming Racist

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

 

 

Whites go out of their way to avoid talking about race

Efforts to appear unbiased lead to misunderstandings between the races, studies find

http://www.apa.org/ 6-Oct-2008

White people – including children as young as 10 — may avoid talking about race so as not to appear prejudiced, according to new research. But that approach often backfires as blacks tend to view this “colorblind” approach as evidence of prejudice, especially when race is clearly relevant.

These results are from two separate sets of experiments led by researchers from Tufts University and Harvard Business School. Their findings are reported in the October issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and the September issue of Developmental Psychology. Both journals are published by the American Psychological Association.

“Efforts to talk about race are fraught with the potential for misunderstandings,” said the studies’ lead author, Evan Apfelbaum, a PhD candidate at Tufts University. “One way that whites try to appear unbiased is to avoid talking about race altogether, a tendency we refer to as strategic colorblindness.”

In one study, 101 white undergraduate students were paired with either a white or black female partner who pretended to be another participant. The pairs were presented with 30 photographs of faces that varied in race, gender and background color. Each white participant’s objective was to guess which of the photographs the partner was holding by asking as few yes-or-no questions as possible.

Even though asking about the race of the person in the photograph was a sound strategy for completing the task, white participants were far less likely to do so with a black versus a white partner. Moreover, when the black partner was the first one to have a turn asking questions, whether she mentioned race had a dramatic effect. White participants whose black partner asked about race mentioned race on their own turn 95 percent of the time. When the black partner never asked about race, white participants only did so 10 percent of the time.

“There was clear evidence the white participants’ behavior was influenced by the precedent set by their partner, but especially when that partner was black,” said Samuel Sommers, assistant professor at Tufts and co-author of both papers. “Whites are strategically avoiding the topic of race because they’re worried that they’ll look bad if they admit they notice it in other people.”

The researchers also wanted to see how outsiders interpreted such interactions. In another experiment, 74 black and white college students evaluated videos of whites engaging in the photo task. The results showed that whites’ effort to appear colorblind backfired. Black observers rated whites’ avoidance of asking about race as being evidence of prejudice. What’s more, when the researchers showed silent video clips of whites from the study to another group of individuals, those whites who avoided asking about race were judged as less friendly, just on the basis of their nonverbal behavior.

“The findings suggest that when race is clearly relevant, whites who think that it is a wise social strategy to avoid talking about race should think again,” said Apfelbaum.

Even children appear to adopt this strategically colorblind approach. In another set of experiments, 101 white children between the ages of 8 and 11 were asked to perform a similar photo task. The children were told that asking as few yes-or-no questions as possible would mean they would get a higher score on the task.

The results showed that the older children, ages 10 and 11, avoided asking about race more than the younger children, even though this led them to perform less efficiently than their younger counterparts on the task. In a control version where all the faces in the photos were white, the older children outperformed the younger children, as expected. “This result is fascinating because it shows that children as young as 10 feel the need to try to avoid appearing prejudiced, even if doing so leads them to perform poorly on a basic cognitive test,” said Kristin Pauker, a PhD candidate at Tufts and co-author of this study.

The authors associated with both studies said their findings offer several important implications. “Our findings don’t suggest that individuals who avoid talking about race are racists,” Apfelbaum explained. “On the contrary, most are well-intentioned people who earnestly believe that colorblindness is the culturally sensitive way to interact. But, as we’ve shown, bending over backward to avoid even mentioning race sometimes creates more interpersonal problems than it solves.”

Posted in Ethnicity, Genetics & Anthropology | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Faith Is The Answer

Posted by addisethiopia / አዲስ ኢትዮጵያ on October 10, 2008

The America we knew as children, back home, seems like a dream and the one we are living in now a nightmare without the relief of morning.

A lot of people are saying lately that God is judging America.
To what extent God’s hand is in all of this remains unknown. I don’t know, perhaps we’re bearing the consequences of our own actions, the pain of our abandonment of sense and the emptiness of a life detached from authentic moral and ethical order. The Bible telly us that God is active in history and can use the ebb and flow of events to hold both people and nations to account.

We do know that ideas, constructs, and behavior have consequences. In this modern world of ours, we are slowly falling prey, for a variety of reasons, to a kind of life that is at once technically advanced but spiritually, emotionally, and socially selfish, greedy, materialistic, and bankrupt. We have poisoned almost everything what was meant good for us.  All of those institutions that are crying wolf are reflections of this very fact.

We see the Wall $treet sharks seeking today for help, ironically, from the same people they have tricked into paying them unwarranted usury: the American taxpayers. Their fall is the direct result of their will to fly high, despite the odds, and, as Icarus of old, their wings of wax are melting now and they struggle in free fall. “O you who live on many waters, rich in treasures, your end has come, and the measure of your unjust gain” (Jeremiah 51:13). Their mistake is clear: “A rich man who crushes the poor is like a sweeping rain which leaves no food” (Proverbs 28:3).

Economic, religious, political, familial, etc systems should be held accountable when their practices contribute to large scale breakdowns or disparities.

We must once again speak against the dangers of consumerism, predatory lending, and greed. Most of all, we need to acknowledge the fact that the sickness of our culture begins to end when We address the illness of our soul.

Posted in Faith | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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